little singer, pa help

Discussion in 'Off Topic [BG]' started by warwickben, Oct 11, 2004.

  1. so my band got a singer. she is really great at singing. but shes never been in a band . no one else sings so were kinda clusess

    how can we stop feed back with the mic. she useing a spare bass ampthey with a mic right now and wat typ of pa do we need so we can hear her for pratice.

    i have a preamp power amp setup and i was thinkign we can use oen of th echannels iam not useing and just buy a speaker and a preamp. is that abad idea :confused:
  2. I dunno, I think the problem with the feedback is the mic is too close to the amp. Can you have her stand on the opposite side of the room, or however far the cord can reach? I think that might solve the problem.
  3. A few tips:
    if you're using a bass amp, turn the lower tones WAY down.

    try pointing the speaker away from the mic

    position the speaker at/or near head level.

    position the singer to avoid picking up other instruments in her mic. or put sound barriers between the mic, the other instruments and the speaker.

    don't play as loud (this one is guaranteed to work!! ;))

    if you get two speakers and point them directly at each other and then position the mic in the middle, it can control feedback some.

    then there's getting a more advanced PA with EQ, feedback eliminators, etc... but that gets expensive.
  4. My advice: go to the American Musical web site or get one of their catalogs, and spring for one of their pre-packaged PA systems for a few hundred bucks...trying to rig up something out of nothing ain't gonna work worth a crap. 4 input channels, a hundred watts or so of power, and a couple of small cabs will work well on practices or even small gigs.

    With a small PA like this, use the cabs as monitors. Set up the band like a band would on stage: drums in back, the instruments on eiether side of the drums, the singer in front with her mic stand. Set the PA speakers on the floor in front of the singer, pointed upwards towards the back of her mic and towards her. (Angle them up some) She will hear herself in the speakers but the mic won't pick it up as much, hence the feedback control. (Pointing the two speakers directly towards each other with the mic in the middle, as according to a previous post, probably WON'T work worth a darn, IMHO.) Basically what you're doing is using these cabs as monitors on the floor.

    Don't try to add a bunch of EQ. Keep all the tone controls basically flat.

    You're risking ruining your singers voice if you keep on the way you are, with a crappy setup she'll be screaming her vocal cords out.
  5. pointing the speakers towards each other can work well when you play realtively loud in a small room. i'm not an expert (by any means) but have used this technique successfully (i was skeptical at first also).
  6. Stu L.

    Stu L. Supporting Member

    Nov 27, 2001
    Corsicana, Texas
    OK, I agree with the first part there. However, the second two contradict(sp?) each other. Never position a speaker towards a mic. Much less at head level. Or "pointing the speaker away" "at/or near head level" won't get you anywhere.

    Unfortunately Nash is right for the most part. Will a bass amp work? Yes. Will a PA sound better, yes again. Ben, if you have to, turn everything down to where the bass amp running the vocals isn't so hot that it feedsback. That's the easiest, but not the most favorable answer. Sorry.
  7. I didn't necessarily mean to do both. the best bet is to lift the speaker up to head level, behind the mic and pointed at the singer (not into the mic) - this makes the "perceived" volume louder without actually turning it up louder.

    also, positioning a mic exactly in the middle of 2 speakers (facing each other) can also work - but position the mic perpendicular to the speakers. like the ascii art below:
    [ | ]

    this works, but you have to be careful not to move the mic or the speakers.
  8. my guitar player quit go us. the singe ralso plays piano so it kinda works out were gonna be bass drums and piano.