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Little Wing - What's with the F?

Discussion in 'General Instruction [BG]' started by t77mackie, Aug 4, 2012.


  1. gigslut

    gigslut

    Dec 13, 2011
    St Louis, Mo
    He also adds a quick passing A between the G and F chords and plays all three with an add 9 on top. This, the hammer on 6ths and 4ths and open string drones are all classic Curtis Mayfield techniques.
     
  2. t77mackie

    t77mackie

    Jun 13, 2012
    Wormtown, MA
    Here's a fun little exercise - play Little Wing but replace the F with an F# or an E - but do so at your own risk, it may cause permanent hearing / brain damage!

    Now if someone could explain just what the heck in going on in I Want You - She's So Heavy I'd be straight... :eyebrow:
     
  3. sammyp

    sammyp

    Aug 20, 2010
    NB, Canada



    Em, G, Am, Em7, Bm, Bb (passing tone) - Key of Gmajor or Eminor .

    , Am, C, G, F, C, D - Key of C major or Am...at the end the D major chord helps to bring it back round to key of G
     
  4. t77mackie

    t77mackie

    Jun 13, 2012
    Wormtown, MA
    I'm sorry, your answer does not include any Greek words or Roman numerals - it does not apply!

    ;]

    But, yeah, couldn't we just said that ^ on post #2 and be done with it? Sheesh!

    ;]!
     
  5. ransombass

    ransombass

    Dec 16, 2008
    Tulsa, Ok
    When we get done playin Little Wing tonight, I'll ask the bar patrons what they thought of my "first inversion major triad based on the lowered supertonic of the major scale". At least then they'll know I'm a serious musician.

    :bag:
     
  6. t77mackie

    t77mackie

    Jun 13, 2012
    Wormtown, MA
    You playing next to Berklee tonight?
     
  7. ransombass

    ransombass

    Dec 16, 2008
    Tulsa, Ok
    Kinda, it's next to a hole-in-the-wall BBQ place.
     
  8. Sloop John D

    Sloop John D

    Jun 29, 2012
    Which section specifically?

    If you ever want explanations of Beatles songs, this is a wonderful resource: http://www.icce.rug.nl/~soundscapes/DATABASES/AWP/awp-notes_on.shtml

    It's an in-depth musical analysis of every Beatles song.
     
  9. t77mackie

    t77mackie

    Jun 13, 2012
    Wormtown, MA
    Hmmmm... Asian musical geniuses and BBQ sauce - a match made in heaven!
     
  10. t77mackie

    t77mackie

    Jun 13, 2012
    Wormtown, MA
    Bookmarked - thanx!

    The whole darn thing! I hate when I have to press 'rewind' to learn a new song. Tab makes me feel 'cheap' and like I'm cheating. But not technique or performance - I'm trying to understand theory more. Thant link looks like a nice way to kill time!

    I remember growing up and mocking the Beatles and then inserting Ratt / Motley Crue tape. What a dummy!
     
  11. wow ... love this thread, a lotta great and interesting opinions. Here's mine.

    I have a decent background in music theory and I've always thought of that whole step change (G to F, E to D, whatever) as a "rock change" (a term I just invented) that doesn't fit into classical theory.

    I'm thinking back to the Kinks' first couple of hits, which were built around whole step changes. "You Really Got Me" and "All Day and All of the Night" from 1964. I'm sure it was used before that, but those songs really locked that change in for me. :bassist:
     
  12. t77mackie

    t77mackie

    Jun 13, 2012
    Wormtown, MA
    House of the Rising Sun - This is like 6 degrees of musical separation.

    Chas Chandler - Jimi Hendrix - SRV - can we get a Billy Gibbons in this slot?
     
  13. pnchad

    pnchad

    Nov 3, 2005
    .....I've read enough

    everyones soooo deep in the weeds - stand back, it's not that complicated

    most tunes can be identified as major or minor in the first 4 bars without even knowing the key

    just listen to the vibe - it's minor ballad (bluesy)

    all GOOD music is based on tension & release - could be rhythm, could be melody, could be harmony or some combinaton of the above

    the F (b2) chord is a VERY commonly used technique in jazz - call it what you want - passing chord, tension chord or as I prefer the 'temporary modulation' - doesn't matter

    music would be extremely boring if everything were diatonic - think Kenny G or Yanni (lmoa)

    there are many jazz tunes that use this device to surprise the ear - it got you guys as designed!

    just tension and release - I use this ALL the time in walking bass lines - chromatic motion from b2 to root or b5 to 4th, etc,

    BTW, if Jimi had lived he would have been playing jazz - study jazz theory - very rich harmonic content
     
  14. Sloop John D

    Sloop John D

    Jun 29, 2012
    Heh... Another interpretation to throw into the mix.

    I've always thought that if Jimi had lived, he would have played progressive rock. He was definitely leaning in that direction in his later recordings.
     
  15. pnchad

    pnchad

    Nov 3, 2005
    Progressive rock is all too diatonic in recent years - very little harmonic diversity

    Jimi was an improvisor not a pattern player in any form - no stock riffs, scales, etc

    Early prog rock ie KC & a few others were interesting.

    & BTW my earlier post is NOT a theory - I actually use similar devices all the time when improvising - read it again - it is just music/art
     
  16. Sloop John D

    Sloop John D

    Jun 29, 2012
    Jimi has a couple recordings where he relies less on improvisation and more on composed lines. Songs like Cherokee Mist and Bolero foreshadow the progressive rock music of groups like King Crimson and Yes that would emerge after his death.

    Even 1983 A Merman I Should Turn to Be has the kind of drawn out experimental improvisation that King Crimson would begin attempting just a year later.

    Jimi died right about the time the whole movement was taking off, so it's impossible to tell how much he would have joined in, but I think there's definitely a possibility that he would have ventured more deeply into it.

    At least that's where I always saw his music heading. No way to know now.
     
  17. I would call it a key change from E minor to C Major. E minor to A Minor would be jumping down a fifth, which is the most common interval for a key change if I remember correctly. I don't see why it would be any different modulating to a C Major instead.
     
  18. t77mackie

    t77mackie

    Jun 13, 2012
    Wormtown, MA
    Does anyone have the music to this? What is the key sig - Em or Gmaj? What happens at the F area? Key change or accidental city?

    Hey, sometimes is fun to complicate a yard sale...

    :smug:
     
  19. I tried looking for it, but I get a lot of them in G Major, B Major, and a couple in D Major
     
  20. Ric5

    Ric5 Supporting Member

    Jan 29, 2008
    Colorado
    I agree ... it is in Em
     

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