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Livealy up your five

Discussion in 'Basses [BG]' started by migo_de_bajo, Apr 4, 2005.


  1. migo_de_bajo

    migo_de_bajo

    Feb 23, 2005
    Hey, could I get a witness from anybody who's played a five that sounds real pretty all up and down the E string. Something that doesn't suffer from concellations between G and C... Do you know what I mean?
     
  2. Bryan R. Tyler

    Bryan R. Tyler TalkBass: Usurping My Practice Time Since 2002 Staff Member Administrator Gold Supporting Member

    May 3, 2002
    Connecticut

    Not at all.
     
  3. EricTheEZ1

    EricTheEZ1

    Nov 23, 2004
    Clawson, MI
    ...no. :confused:
     
  4. Bryan R. Tyler

    Bryan R. Tyler TalkBass: Usurping My Practice Time Since 2002 Staff Member Administrator Gold Supporting Member

    May 3, 2002
    Connecticut
    To clarify, I have no idea what "livealy up your five" is supposed to mean, and concellations isn't a word, so I have no idea what that means either. And why would the E on a five-string sound different than an E on a four-string, six-string, etc.? Are you looking for a five-string in particular (not a four or a six, etc.) and that's why you asked about a five-string? :confused:
     
  5. migo_de_bajo

    migo_de_bajo

    Feb 23, 2005
    Sorry guys--I was trying to be cute. Livealy up your five just reminded me of "Lively Up Your Life" by Marley.

    >>concellations

    Uh, woops--meant cancellations--dead spots.

    >>And why would the E on a five-string sound different than an E on a four-string, six-string, etc.?

    Don't 5 or 6 string necks generally have more wood in them than 4 string necks? Plus aren't they generally subject to more total string tension? Won't those things have an effect on tonal response. Just as 4 string necks,--and not just on Fenders--tend to have a dead spot somewhere on either side of the 4th or 5th fret on the G string, won't 5 string necks of conventional design tend to have their own dead spots (concellations :D), at certain places, too?

    I'm working with a really small test sample here--just the 5 multi-string bass guitars that I've owned--but it just seem like one thing they all have had in common it that they have not been real lively in the register I mentioned. The notes from G to D or E just want to be slightly absorbed, damped, cancelled, whatever the right word is. The tendency has varied from bass to bass--maybe I've just had crap basses.

    It's entirely possible that I'm off in outer space on this. Every once in a while I start thinking about selling off 2 or 3 of my dearly beloveds to get something else, and I wondered if anybody had experience with an instrument that really sounded sweet to them in that 45-75 Hz range.

    Thanks for reading.
     
  6. 5stringDNA

    5stringDNA

    Oct 10, 2002
    Englewood, CO
    My Czech Scpetor is very even across teh whole string, but I do tune with a High C, not a B. Most of my playing is actually in the 3rd-9th fret zone, and I haven't had any big issues with any of the 5's I own.
     
  7. On 35" 5string basses G string can sound thin,but...
    Did you check the pickup's/string's height? If the treble side of the pup is too low the sound disappears.Check it out.
     
  8. migo_de_bajo

    migo_de_bajo

    Feb 23, 2005
    This is an acoustic thing, but it affects the amplified sound. It's like the overall resonance of the bass is robbing the string of its initial fullness. Like the energy of the note is being sucked up slightly by the bass, instead of booming right out.
     
  9. If I remember right (though I might be wrong)
    this is an acoustic problem and is called a wolf note, or something like that, isn't it?
     
  10. embellisher

    embellisher Holy Ghost filled Bass Player Staff Member Supporting Member

    I own 3 fives and two sixes, and all of them have B strings. None of them have the problems you describe.