Long lasting strings

Discussion in 'Strings [BG]' started by brianh, Mar 3, 2006.

  1. brianh


    Aug 19, 2005
    Endorsing: Epifani Amplification
    On my F bass BN5 I've been using either Fodera or DR heavy gauge strings. I like the Fodera the best, but the DR's last longer and still sound pretty good. I like a really agressive sound with a ton of growl.

    Neither of the strings though is lasting long enough for me. I simply can't afford to put new stings on every 2 weeks. Any ideas on something new to try???/
  2. flatwoundfender


    Feb 24, 2005
  3. Philbiker

    Philbiker Pat's the best!

    Dec 28, 2000
    Northern Virginia, USA
    All strings last years. They take two weeks minimum to break in. My suggestions would be to change your EQ/whatever to get used to the real sound of the strings. Or find a set of strings that you like the sound and feel of post break-in.
  4. GSRLessard14

    GSRLessard14 All-Things-Claypool Enthusiast

    Jun 23, 2005
    Newington, CT
  5. agplate


    Jan 12, 2005
    New England
    Elixir strings really do last a long time, and having tried the DR coated, D'dadarrio coated (don't bother) and Elixirs, I find that the Elixirs are the best. I like bright strings, and these were plenty bright for me. In my experience, the polywebs lasted longer (you'll be surprised) and had less flaking. In fact I had two of the nanoweb A strings go dead on me. So I'm a polyweb guy.
  6. tgrant


    Nov 7, 2005
    Middletown, VA
    flatwoundfender said
    Flatwounds might not sound bright enough. A good compromise might be to go with black tape wounds. They are much brighter and they don't feel quite as tight as the flatwounds. Plus, they will last you a few years.
  7. Halftooth

    Halftooth Supporting Member

    Nov 24, 2002
    Tri-Valley, NorCal
    Zon Ultrasonics seem to last the longest for me compared to any other string brand.
  8. Chasarms

    Chasarms Casual Observer

    May 24, 2001
    Bettendorf, IA USA
    Typically, a stainless steel string will maintain brightness and clarity longer than a nickel string. Although, midtone presence, often associated with "growl" is also typically less with stainless steel.

    I have had exceptional luck using Dean Markley SR2000s. They sound great new and hold up pretty well.
  9. Kronos


    Dec 28, 2005
    Philadelphia, PA
    You could clean your strings after two weeks. Soak them in Denatured Alcohol.

    There's a thread on this somewhere on here, but I have no idea where it would be.

    Anyway, there's a TB'er who has a rotation of strings in tupperware. As soon as one set gets dull, he swaps them out with ones that are in the tupperware. He puts the dull ones in the tupperware with the denatured alcohol. Supposedly makes them as good as new...but I've yet to try it. The only reason I recommend it is because so many people have had success with it.
  10. Chasarms

    Chasarms Casual Observer

    May 24, 2001
    Bettendorf, IA USA
    The alcohol soak may clean some of the crud out of the windings and improve the tone a bit, but at the same time, you can only lower and retension strings so many times before the process destroys their tone.

    I don't think the strings would go through too many two-week rotations before crapping out.
  11. StringsOf4


    Dec 16, 2005
    Wash your hands before you play and wipe the strings after you play. seriously, it sounds kinda dumb but this is what i do and my Ernie Ball slinkys last for at least 3-4 months. And trust me slinkys aren't very "high tech" strings and normally they don't last long at all, but i like-a da sound!

  12. I use Purell waterless hand cleaner (contains ethyl alchohol).
    Plus wiping strings down with alchohol helps after playing.

    Elixer Nanowebs last a long time and are pretty bright and good thump for coated strings.
  13. Snarf


    Jan 23, 2005
    New York, NY

    Don't waste your money on Elixirs.