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Looking for advice on minor repair on Behringer Amp

Discussion in 'Amps and Cabs [BG]' started by Mindabout, Feb 26, 2006.


  1. Mindabout

    Mindabout

    Apr 11, 2004
    Australia
    I have a Behringer Ultrabass BX3000T amp. Recently when I unplugged from the amp I ripped a collar type thingy out of the input jack. I'll explain:

    Someone gave me an expensive, fancy lead for Christmas which jams in really tight to the input jacks - the plugs are designed not to pull out of the amp by accident. I have always been careful to twist as I pulled the plugs out of my amp and bass because I was worried about damaging the inputs because the fit was that tight.

    Anyway, the other day I pulled the plug out of my amp and noticed that I had pulled a piece out of the jack. The plug had a little metal collar thing still wrapped around the bottom end of it (where the metal expands out and grabs tightly). I had to leaver it off the plug with a knife because it was so tight. I inspected it and it doesn't have any obvious lumps of solder on it or anything to suggest that it was ever attached inside the amp by any method other than friction. I tried pushing it back into the input jack on the amp but the fit is too tight to push it in with just my fingers. Also, it is sort of "ribbed" (not drastically, just some shallow stripes) at one end and I'm not sure anymore which way it was facing originally.

    So, I was considering using a soft mallet to tap the collar back into the jack but I'm a bit nervous about doing it in case I could do any damage... and especially seeing as I have no idea what its function is inside the jack.

    Has anyone had this problem before? Know what the part does - if it needs to be soldered in or anything. Any help would be much appreciated.
     
  2. fdeck

    fdeck Supporting Member Commercial User

    Mar 20, 2004
    Madison WI
    HPF Technology LLC
    This is a potentially difficult problem. Virtually all bass amps have the jacks soldered down onto the printed circuit board, meaning that you have to remove the entire board and find an exact replacement in order to service a jack.

    Tapping with a mallet is a bad idea. If the BX3000T is like other Behringer gear that I have seen, there is not a bushing and nut holding the jack onto the panel, thus the jack may be entirely supported by the circuit board. In that case, you could crack the board.

    In my days of repairing gear, if someone brought me an amp with a broken jack, I would often replace the printed circuit jack with a panel jack on short wires. It was often easier, and a better fix, than trying to find an exact replacement. The rule of thumb was "sacrifice anything, including your pride, to avoid damaging the circuit board."

    Once you get the BX3000T open, take some pics and share. But don't open it unless you know how to work on equipment without getting hurt.
     
  3. Munjibunga

    Munjibunga Total Hyper-Elite Member Gold Supporting Member

    May 6, 2000
    San Diego (when not at Groom Lake)
    Independent Contractor to Bass San Diego
    B-word gear is disposable. Just get another one. It'll last about the same as this one.
     
  4. BillyB_from_LZ

    BillyB_from_LZ Supporting Member

    Sep 7, 2000
    Chicago
    I'm with fdeck..have the service person use a high quality panel mount jack with short lead wires to connect it to the circuit board.

    I once bought a Peavey Minx 110 for $10 because the input jack fell apart (it was otherwise mint)...slapped in a nice Switchcraft jack for under $5 and away I went..
     
  5. seamonkey

    seamonkey

    Aug 6, 2004
    I actually agree with this.

    If you can't add a panel mount jack yourself, or find a friendly neighbor or relative that knows how to solder - then just replace the amp.
    You can probably sell it for $50 to someone who can replace the jack. And get a new Behringer for $200.

    But I still wouldn't buy expensive amp, You will ruin any amp jack by using an oversize plug. And just because an amp cost 4x as much, it still not worth paying the bench charges to fix it.

    Best to learn some basic soldering.
     
  6. Munjibunga

    Munjibunga Total Hyper-Elite Member Gold Supporting Member

    May 6, 2000
    San Diego (when not at Groom Lake)
    Independent Contractor to Bass San Diego
    But seriously, folks, this is the right answer. If you have rudimentary soldering skills, you can replace the jack.
     
  7. syciprider

    syciprider Banned

    May 27, 2005
    Inland Empire
    Monster cable strikes again?
     
  8. Munjibunga

    Munjibunga Total Hyper-Elite Member Gold Supporting Member

    May 6, 2000
    San Diego (when not at Groom Lake)
    Independent Contractor to Bass San Diego
    Sounds more like Planet Waves to me.
     
  9. fdeck

    fdeck Supporting Member Commercial User

    Mar 20, 2004
    Madison WI
    HPF Technology LLC
    I always thought one of the nice things about 1/4" plugs is that they stay put until you tug too hard on them. Then they pull out instead of damaging your bass / amp. The last thing I want is a locking cord on my bass.
     
  10. fdeck

    fdeck Supporting Member Commercial User

    Mar 20, 2004
    Madison WI
    HPF Technology LLC
    Another thing about repairing the amp is... I still want to see pictures. It would help end the widespread speculation about those amps, for better or worse.
     
  11. Dkerwood

    Dkerwood

    Aug 5, 2005
    Midwest
    Or so they're supposed to. I once had an acoustic/electric bass that a bass playing buddy of mine was using onstage while I was playing acoustic guitar next to him. He turned quickly, not realizing that I was standing on his cord. CRRRRACK!!! About a 3" section of wood cracked around the input jack cracked out.

    Luckily, the warranty covered it (for some weird reason).

    Of course, on the other hand, my stage monitors come unplugged FAR too easily (although it could just be a slightly smaller jack on the speaker cable).
     
  12. fdeck

    fdeck Supporting Member Commercial User

    Mar 20, 2004
    Madison WI
    HPF Technology LLC
    If it's anything, it's probably the connector on the speaker itself. Some jacks have very low contact pressure, so it's easy to pull out the plug. Short of changing the jacks or upgrading to Speakons, I would suggest looping the cables around the handles of the speakers.
     
  13. Mindabout

    Mindabout

    Apr 11, 2004
    Australia
    I should have explained properly when I posted but the lead plugs look like the ones on this page:

    http://www.musicianswarehouse.com.au/default.aspx?Pg=21&ProductCode=PWG10

    They have the "compression springs to ensure positive connection".

    I know the friend who gave me the lead spent a lot of money on it because I know they asked for the best lead - so they would have been given the most expensive one. So, besides sorting out my amp - is there any chance I can squeeze the springs down with pliers or something so I can use the lead like a normal one?

    As for my amp - I haven't opened it up because my father who is an eletrician always used to say that electrical devices like that could potentially have a lot of energy stored in them and could be very dangerous to open. He said that when we were little... so I'm not sure if it would still apply now - he is not around for a while so I can't ask him to take a look at it any time soon.

    I am thinking of taking my amp into someone who repairs amps for a living just as soon as I can afford it. In the meantime I'm getting on okay playing through an old crappy lead into the passive input with my bass switched to passive.

    Appreciate your advice guys - saved me from giving my amp the mallet treatment....
     
  14. seamonkey

    seamonkey

    Aug 6, 2004
    Those are really bad plugs. They've already cost you more than what they're worth. Throw out the cable, or cut off the plugs and solder o new ones. Don't give it to another friend or they'll ruin their equipment. You might also write to Planet Waves and explain how their cable ruined your amp. They might want to make good on they damage they've caused. IMHO - Their design is faulty, and should be taken off the market.

    Listen to your dad on issues of safety. Don't take the cover off until he or someone you trust walks you through some issues of safety.