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Looking for melodic study material

Discussion in 'General Instruction [BG]' started by jusaplaya, Mar 12, 2009.


  1. jusaplaya

    jusaplaya

    Dec 14, 2004
    Houston, TX
    I am looking for study/practice material that is melodic and rhythmic. I have a couple of books that I practice out of but the material is so boring and dry. I looked at the Charlie Parker Omnibook but I felt that the material was more advanced than I am ready for. I have been playing about 2 years and consider myself to be an intermediate player.

    I think that for me playing melodic exercises would be more interesting and beneficial than just playing through scales and arpeggios. I can see how these are applied to songs and study my sight reading at the same time.
     
  2. mambo4

    mambo4

    Jun 9, 2006
    Dallas
    I'd check out
    the Bass Bible by Paul Westwood (which I have)

    or BASS GROOVES: THE ULTIMATE COLLECTION by Jon Liebman (which I don't)

    Both are catalogs of bass lines in various styles. That way, as you improve your reading you will be adding to you practical bass playing knowledge.


    If you want true Melodies, than any of the Fake/Real Books out there will be full of them.
     
  3. Yeah, there are three volumes of bass clef Real Books now. I have a couple of great trombone melody collections that are great for what you are talking about--just browse a good music store in the trombone section--JJ Johnson's jazz etude book is a good one for this.
     
  4. chicagodoubler

    chicagodoubler

    Aug 7, 2007
    Chicago, that toddling town
    Endorsing Artist: Lakland, Genz Benz
    Trombone/ cello/ bassoon etudes and simple concerti/ sonatas.

    Beautiful melodies, many composers, lots of recordings available.
     
  5. JTE

    JTE Supporting Member

    Mar 12, 2008
    Central Illinois, USA
    Learn to read treble clef, and get a real book, a Beatles book, and something like a "Best of American Musical Theatre" kinds of things. That'll give you TONS of great melodies to play.

    jte
     
  6. jonster

    jonster

    Nov 12, 2008
    Thanks for the mention, Mambo4. Hope I can help the cause!

    Jon Liebman
    www.JonLiebman.com
     
  7. jusaplaya

    jusaplaya

    Dec 14, 2004
    Houston, TX
    Thanks for the advice. I actually saw the Bass Grooves book last week at a sheet music shop in Houston and almost bought it. It covers almost any style music you can think of. I'll pick it up tomorrow if it is still there. Really great suggestions. Jon I bought your slap bass book, so I am familiar with your work. Keep it up.
     
  8. slybass3000

    slybass3000 Banned

    Nov 5, 2004
    Montréal,Qc,Canada
    You may check out John Pattitucci's book on Melodic studies. Written for bass by a bass player and a good one ;-),


    Sly
     
  9. jonster

    jonster

    Nov 12, 2008
    jusaplaya:

    Don't buy anything till you check the prices on my website! Whatever you end up doing, thank you very much. Contact me anytime if I can be of help. Thanks, bass brother (or sister?)!

    Jon Liebman
    jon@jonliebman.com
    www.JonLiebman.com
     
  10. Bob DiGiacomo

    Bob DiGiacomo

    May 6, 2007
    NYC
    In another era I would have said to just turn on the radio and play along with the melodies that come along, but today's radio leaves a bit to be desired.......
    Open up iTunes, or something like it and hit random. Now play along. The trick is to be as accurate as possible. Listen to the melody and try to copy its phrasing as exactly as possible. Especially play along with singers. Once you know the melody by heart, write it down. Moving the notes from something you feel to something you can intellectualize will really make you understand how to play melodies better. I have been doing this lately with Chet Baker solos. He is perfect because he doesn't play too fast, but has great ideas, phrasing and pacing in his solos.
    There is nothing like practicing with live musicians, but the next best thing is to play along with a song as if you were playing live in the band. Really put youself onstage, mentally that is, and your melodic playing will improve rapidly.
     
  11. jusaplaya

    jusaplaya

    Dec 14, 2004
    Houston, TX
    Sorry Jon, I bought the book on Friday right after work and missed your message. I do love the book and I will start into it Saturday as soon as I take the GMAT test. I listened to the CD on the way home and have to say the jazz, funk and reggae grooves are very nice and I can't wait to learn them.
     
  12. Correlli

    Correlli

    Apr 2, 2004
    New Zealand
    there is only one book I would consider for understanding melody.

    Study of Counterpoint by John Fux

    Used by Leopold Mozart to train his son
     
  13. jonster

    jonster

    Nov 12, 2008
    jusaplaya -- no need to apologize, whatsoever. Glad you like the book (tell a friend!). Thanks!

    Jon Liebman
    www.JonLiebman.com
     
  14. jonster

    jonster

    Nov 12, 2008
    Correlli,

    Come on, was that really his name? Maybe that was his "porn star" name. Poor guy!

    Jon Liebman
    www.JonLiebman.com
     
  15. Correlli

    Correlli

    Apr 2, 2004
    New Zealand

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