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Looking for tropical music or "Salsa" tabs,preferably hector lavoe songs

Discussion in 'Tablature and Notation [BG]' started by moi, Nov 19, 2004.


  1. moi

    moi

    Nov 19, 2004
    ponce.PR
    well that's it....i have been unable to find any salsa tabs and coming from a punk background im trying to find something more challenging,if anyone out there can help me i'd be very thankfull
     
  2. Macron69

    Macron69

    Mar 24, 2000
    Puerto Rico
    I'm afraid you won't find any here. Maybe if you post on the Double Bass forums. Since salsa bass is mostly played with a Baby Bass, you may get answers from upright players.

    Suerte con eso.
     
  3. BlackBass9

    BlackBass9

    Dec 4, 2004
    Same problem over here, I tried all over the web and couldn't find any. I started doing them myself. I have some tabs by Ruben Blades and Gilberto Santarosa. Salsa music it's not very hard to play If you really know the music. Too much syncopation. (same applies to reggae).It often emphasizes the root and 5. Listen to Andy Gonzalez or the Bass player for Victor Manuel who are masters of this style. Good Luck!



    I would rather play some Puya, hehe!

    and I wish I was in Cabo Rojo right now.sucks! :bawl:
     
  4. Bruce Lindfield

    Bruce Lindfield Unprofessional TalkBass Contributor Gold Supporting Member

    I think the point is that Salsa - which covers a broad range of musical styles(!) - is all about the rhythmic placement of notes in the bass and the choice of notes is pretty straightforward - usually root-fifth!

    So Tabs are basically useless, as they generally contain no rhythmic information and the most basic concept in Salsa, is tying across the bar line - easy to see in standard notation - no idea how you get this concept in Tabs...:meh:
     
  5. fiebru1119

    fiebru1119

    Mar 2, 2004
    Orlando, FL
    Like what others have already said above, your best bet is to listen carefully and try to get the "feel". The only other suggestion I have is to find some music written out in standard notation so that you have feel for the rythm (although sometimes even standard notation cant help you there).

    In all of the salsa I've played, I just get a chord chart and play roots and 5ths with the ocassional 3rds or 7ths (sometimes 9ths and 13ths) depending on what the rest of the band is doing.
     
  6. Bruce Lindfield

    Bruce Lindfield Unprofessional TalkBass Contributor Gold Supporting Member

    But unless it has the right rhythmic 'feel' as you say, then it's not Salsa!

    So - typical, is anticipating the chord change, on beat 4 of the preceding bar, then holding it across the bar line, thereby avoiding the first beat of the bar - quite difficult to do and get right...?
     
  7. fiebru1119

    fiebru1119

    Mar 2, 2004
    Orlando, FL
    Absolutely! Especially for someone unfamiliar to the music its could be even harder.. Having been around this type of music most of my life I can hold up pretty well. I do remember the first time I saw a bass line written out in standard notation I was like ***?! even though it was a relatively simple tune. Thats why I say listen as much as you can and get the feel and syncopation right.. as mentioned above, its much like reggae in this respect.
     
  8. Rodriguez

    Rodriguez

    Nov 6, 2004
    NYC
    Endorsing Artist: Aguilar Amplification & LaBella Strings
    Hey guys, I've looked at some tabs and must say, that doesn't look easy to me at all. Now, what I'd like to suggest is: Invest a little more time (if you've got it), find a teacher to help you develop your reading chops, or find whatever tune your looking to learn and use your ears, play along and learn it that way. My feeling is that if you use your ears you'll learn/memorize it much quicker than reading it. I've done my share of recordings w/ plenty of salsa artists and I can say that maybe 50% (if not more) of the time there is no music, if you're lucky you may get a chord chart on a piece of notebook paper, that's were experience (stuff you've learned by playing along w/ records) takes over. Hope this helps some of you.

    Happy Holidays,
    R
     
  9. Alvaro Martín Gómez A.

    Alvaro Martín Gómez A. TalkBass' resident Bongo + cowbell player

    Here's my contribution to this topic. Some time ago I transcribed the bassline of a Salsa tune I like so much (actually, I transcribed the whole horn section, harmony -chord changes- and bassline) and I'd like you to check it out. This is not played with a baby bass. It's an electric bass guitar played by Salsa bassist extraordinaire Salvador Cuevas (best known for his work with Fania All-Star artists like Willie Colón or Rubén Blades). This is a great Salsa bassline which even has a slap part and, as you'll see, there are lots of syncopation, but not so many "cross-bar" notes. The tune is called "La Agarro Bajando", performed by singer Gilberto Santa Rosa. It was a big radio hit like two years ago. I'd be glad if you check it out, specially bassists that are not so familiar with the style. It would make me so happy to know that I've made a little contribution to your playing vocabulary. :hyper:

    If you have a P2P software like LimeWire or KaZaA Lite, you can find the mp3 easily. Just look for "La Agarro Bajando" or by artist "Gilberto Santa Rosa". If someone is interested on the tune but can't get it, just let me know and I'll post it as a YouSendIt link for you to download. Hope you enjoy it! :) :bassist:

    P.S.: You'll need WinZip and Adobe Acrobat Reader for opening the file. Please note that Salsa tunes are written in cut (2/2) time. Tempo is around 100 half notes per minute.
     
  10. Rodriguez

    Rodriguez

    Nov 6, 2004
    NYC
    Endorsing Artist: Aguilar Amplification & LaBella Strings
    Alvaro, nice job w/ the transcription. One thing though, the last montuno section, (the slap part) the third beat of bar one is an F. The sequence is basically octaves & tenths resolving w/ third and root (of the C7th b9 chord). That tumbao was originally recorded on the Fania All Stars "Crossover" album in '79, there's an overdub bass solo by Sal on the track. By the way, I also recorded on that GSR CD, it's the last song (can't remember the title right now) on the CD.

    Felicidades,
    R

    P.D. Hace 9 años estuve en Bucaramanga, y hasta probe las hormigas culonas. LOL
     
  11. Alvaro Martín Gómez A.

    Alvaro Martín Gómez A. TalkBass' resident Bongo + cowbell player

    WOW! Mr. Rubén Rodríguez!? I've just checked that track "Pueden Decir" from GSR's "Intenso". What an honor to share thoughts with someone who played bass for Gilberto Santa Rosa! As I've said countless times in this forum, the music that flows through my veins is classic rock, but I like Salsa a lot too. BTW, one of my favorite songs to play from my tropical music band's current set list is "Conciencia" (with the baby bass, of course. It doesn't feel that cool with the bass guitar).

    Soy de Bucaramanga, pero detesto esas hormigas. La única vez que las probé me produjeron unas agrieras horribles. :)