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Lowering my Action?

Discussion in 'Hardware, Setup & Repair [BG]' started by Fetusyolk, Sep 2, 2008.


  1. Fetusyolk

    Fetusyolk

    Aug 7, 2008
    I read the main thread linking to setup sites and i searched action and i still can't find anything i can quite wrap my head around.

    i'd like to lower my action as around my 12th fret my strings seem to get a bit too high, now, i originally thought that adjusting my bridge would alter my action, but it seems that this is only for intonation?

    Is lowering my action only doable by adjusting my truss rod?

    if so i'm pretty hesitant, as i don't want to destroy my neck, any suggestions?
     
  2. search trends on talkbass, you can lower your action by adjusting your bridge sadles. Dont forget to adjust your neck since youre changing the tension. Just go gently if its your first time and everything will be fine
     
  3. Fetusyolk

    Fetusyolk

    Aug 7, 2008
    How should i adjust my neck in regards to how much i adjust my bridge saddles?
     
  4. Lorenzini

    Lorenzini

    Dec 31, 2004
    Los Angeles
    Here are the actions I take to get the lowest possible action on my bass -- then if it's just not low enough I'll take it in to get a fret job if the frets are noticably uneven, causing fretbuzz.

    http://www.garywillis.com/pages/bass/bassmanual/setupmanual.html

    The basic ideas are:

    * truss rod controls neck relief
    * bridge saddles control string height off the body (bridge depth [lengthwise measurement] has to do with intonation -- bridge saddle height does not)
    * nut slots being the right height (i've never owned a bass where this was done incorrectly, so can't make any recommendations on it)

    I generally tighten the truss rod -- 1/2 turn per day to be safe!!! -- until the relief is about the thickness of a creditcard or thick business card. Some basses have such superior fretwork that relief allows the fret to all but touch the 12th fret. Find the relief by fretting the 1st fret, choking the last fret on the neck and seeing how high the strings are off the 12th fret. This is the first step, and should be done prior to any bridge saddle adjustment.

    As soon as the relief is set, make your adjustment on the bridge saddles. Every bridge is different so I won't comment on HOW this is done, I hope you can figure it out ;)

    The basic idea is that you have to first setup the NECK which determines relief, and THEN the BRIDGE which determines the height between the body and the neck..

    I hope this makes sense
     
  5. alexgeddy

    alexgeddy Supporting Member

    Feb 25, 2007
    NJ
    has to do with intonation -- bridge saddle height does not)
    * nut slots being the right height (i've never owned a bass where this was done incorrectly, so can't make any recommendations on it)


    Unfortunatelay, bridge saddle height has a lot to do with intonation.... just check your intonation after raising the saddles....try it at the 12th fret then at the 19th fret......it's all a trade off!!


    good luck
    Bill
     
  6. Lorenzini

    Lorenzini

    Dec 31, 2004
    Los Angeles
    Bill

    That's nice, and you're correct. But more to the point - I am just trying to help him fix his action.

     

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