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Mackie M1400: How loud is the van?

Discussion in 'Amps and Cabs [BG]' started by Tightanic, May 15, 2003.


  1. Tightanic

    Tightanic Supporting Member

    Oct 26, 2000
    NYC
    Hi everybody,
    still looking for proper components for my future rig, I wondered how a Macki M1400 will perform as a bass power amp, and especially how loud it's fan will get.
    I initially wanted to buy a PLX1202, but these things are so expensive here (Germany) and I heard that the RMX have annoying fans. There's a auction on a M1400 on ebay.de, but I'd prefer to find our first what this is all about.:rolleyes:

    Thanks!
    Johannes
     
  2. It isn't any louder than anyother power-amp I've used. If fan noise is a concern, look at Stewart 1.2 or Crown K-1 or K-2. (no fans)
     
  3. boogiebass

    boogiebass

    Aug 16, 2000
    I used a 1400i in a bass rig quite a bit. If you drive the amp hard, the fan kicks into a higher level. It would be noticeable in the studio but I never heard it on a gig. Mine ultimately developed problems with the input jacks and currently needs service. The main problem with the amp, IMO, when compared to the competition is that it's quite heavy. A QSC PLX will blow it away on weight considerations but a Stewart World will REALLY be much lighter. Not sure of the availability of Stewart in Germany, however. Good luck.
     
  4. Tightanic

    Tightanic Supporting Member

    Oct 26, 2000
    NYC
    Yea, I know about it's weight. But on the other hand, the QSC RMX are even heavier (at least a bit) and seem to be in the same class, specification-wise, however. As I wrote, I am considering a PLX, but I am a student, and I'm not quite sure whether it's really such a great idea to spend about 2500$ on a bass rig (including the cabs) and then bring it to all those seedy parties and clubs where someone will loose control of his trembling hand and and spoil it with beer. :eek:
    D'you get my point? ;)
    Well, let's see whether there'll be some further input on this. Thanks to you two guys anyway!

    Johannes Felscher
     
  5. alexclaber

    alexclaber Commercial User

    Jun 19, 2001
    Brighton, UK
    Director - Barefaced Ltd
    I use a Mackie M1400 - it's heavy but it's very loud and has proven totally reliable. The fan is always on but its pretty quiet, I doubt it would be a problem when recording and you definitely won't notice it live.

    Alex
     
  6. Tightanic

    Tightanic Supporting Member

    Oct 26, 2000
    NYC
    How do you like the overall sound quality? Is it what you expected it to be?
     
  7. alexclaber

    alexclaber Commercial User

    Jun 19, 2001
    Brighton, UK
    Director - Barefaced Ltd
    Absolutely - it doesn't sound like anything, it just makes everything louder. I use it with an EMG'd Warwick into an SWR Grand Prix, and the Mackie drives two Acme Low-B2 cabs. It manages to get very loud (and Acmes are rather inefficient cabs) and the clarity is exceptional.

    Mackies may not be high end power amps but they are so much better than the power amp sections of almost any bass head: loads more headroom, less noise, very tight controlled and accurate sound. And the high pass filter and limiter and great for tightening up your sound and protecting your speaker cabs.

    Only downside is the weight but in a light rackcase with good handles it's perfectly manageable, no heavier than a light 2x10" cab.

    Alex
     
  8. jondog

    jondog

    Mar 14, 2002
    NYC metro area
    I've used one for almost 2 years now. The fan is always on, you don't notice at gigs but you might at home or in a studio. I don't use a poweramp when recording so it's no problem for me. It is heavy, so I've considered replacing it, but that's the only reason I don't like it. Everything else about it is great -- powerful, headroom galore, doesn't color tone, 4 protection stages, etc. Also, if I wanted to use it for PA, it's got good features too, like the horn eq and the sub xover.
     
  9. Tightanic

    Tightanic Supporting Member

    Oct 26, 2000
    NYC
    I'm glad that you like it! But isn't it true that bridging is only possible via binding-post connection? That would be far appart from being ideal for an application like amplifying bass. It is (at least mostly) mono, and there's serious demand for high power. :rolleyes: Do you have any knowledge about that?

    Johannes
     
  10. alexclaber

    alexclaber Commercial User

    Jun 19, 2001
    Brighton, UK
    Director - Barefaced Ltd
    I run the Mackie in parallel mono mode - i.e. each channel putting 500W @ 4 ohms into each Acme. If you want to bridge the amp you can either use the binding posts or banana plugs (which are illegal in Europe but you can still get them but you'll have to pull out the silly blanking plugs that stop you using banana plugs). Banana plugs are ideal for high power connections - just remember not to go sticking them in mains sockets, duh!

    If you do use the Mackie in bridged mono, be careful that you don't push it too hard - it'll take a hell of a cab to handle being driven by a 1400W amp that's sitting on its (very transparent) limiter without the voice coils melting. You'll also go deaf...

    Alex
     
  11. Tightanic

    Tightanic Supporting Member

    Oct 26, 2000
    NYC
    Well, I just prefer speakons for their handy design, there can't go anything wrong with them!

    :eek:

    Remember that it puts out about 850 to 1000 Watts at 8 Ohms bridged (depending on how much THD you can take) and thats about the amount of power which is suitable for Epifani 210 or 310 cabs, as an example!

    No, not quite...my bandmates will, i wear earplugs! :bag: :D
     
  12. jondog

    jondog

    Mar 14, 2002
    NYC metro area
    I have never needed all 1400w from bridging. I run a biamp rig, so it's stereo into 8 ohm cabs and I've never run out of volume or headroom.
     
  13. alexclaber

    alexclaber Commercial User

    Jun 19, 2001
    Brighton, UK
    Director - Barefaced Ltd
    Indeed, but banana plugs are sufficiently straight forward that I wouldn't consider it a problem.

    Even that much power could damage those cabs if you use distortion or heavy compression and ride the limiter - but if you can keep foolish fellows from borrowing your rig you'll be fine with many many kilowatts.

    Me too. I would pity my bandmates likewise but it's their foolhardy decision not to wear earplugs...

    More power!

    Alex
     
  14. Tightanic

    Tightanic Supporting Member

    Oct 26, 2000
    NYC
    Despite the need for speakon-banana adaptors, you're propably right.

    :( Unfortunately, you tell my exact truth. In the local band scene, there's always anyone one a multiple-bands-show who has no usable equipment at all (actually most of them) so it is unavoidable that some guy wants to use your rig.
    In that case, it's as hard being steadfast as having to teach the whole load about proper amp treatment...:rolleyes:

    I dunno why all these guys don't seem to take care. During my first years as a band's bassist, I hardly ever used earplugs, but as soon as I realized that a slight tinnitus had appeared (and unfortunately stayed), which is rather warning than disturbing, I put an end to the dB-madness and became a convert. And anyway, those things just help you to keep hearing what you're playing, instead of becoming deaf after the first set of a gig, and I don't even notice that I wear them, thanks to indiviual shaping.

    Johannes
     
  15. 8_finger

    8_finger Supporting Member

    Jun 1, 2002
    Baltimore, MD
    music store koeln
    has stewart amps and they are relatively cheap (454€) check it out
     
  16. Tightanic

    Tightanic Supporting Member

    Oct 26, 2000
    NYC
    Thank you 8_fingers for the suggestion. I'm aware of the availability of Stewart amps in cologne, but they don't really attract me for two reasons:
    1. There are no highpass filters to adjust response of very deep bass.
    2. They don't seem to have speakon outs.

    But maybe I'll be able to try them some time! I live about 500km/300 miles from cologne, so I won't travel that far just to plug my bass into an amp!;)
     
  17. Tightanic

    Tightanic Supporting Member

    Oct 26, 2000
    NYC
    Well, I think that my opinion changed a bit:
    Concerning the great price and also the great reviews (BP), the Stew doesn't seem to be a bad choice at all! Especially adding a Behringer PEQ-2200 (5 bands parametric EQ with low & high-cut filters) would cure one of the bigges issues: The subsonic disaster.;)

    Johannes