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Madagascar Rosewood fingerboard & boiled linseed oil

Discussion in 'Hardware, Setup & Repair [BG]' started by michele, Jun 29, 2004.


  1. michele

    michele Supporting Member

    Apr 2, 2004
    Italy
    I'm the proud owner of a Sadowsky NYC with a beautiful madagascar rosewood fingerboard. Roger told me to use a little linseed oil to clean and oil the fingerboard a couple of times a year. Is it the same linseed oil used as an additive for oil-based paints?
     
  2. Gander

    Gander

    Jun 5, 2002
    Texas
    I use boiled linseed oil on my rosewood boards. I bought a one quart can at my Ace hardware store for a few dollars. It should last me forever. When I change strings I polish the frets and fretboard with 0000 steel wool and apply a coat, let is soak for 10 minutes, remove the excess and buff.
     
  3. michele

    michele Supporting Member

    Apr 2, 2004
    Italy
    Thanks Gander,
    just wanna ask you if it's the same linseed oil that one can buy at Beax Arts stores, the one used as an additive for oil-based paints. Here in Italy in Hardware stores (like your Ace) all that I can find is a linseed oil that's not pure 100% but that contains a little petroleum and thrementine in it ... I'm scared to death that this could damage the fingerboard ...
     
  4. Gander

    Gander

    Jun 5, 2002
    Texas
    I'll have to plead ignorance on that one, Michele. Maybe one of the other guys here or Roger could help you. Good luck and congrats on your new bass.
     
  5. The artists linseed oil isn't the stuff. That's a pure linseed and it will never dry. When your neck gets warm, it will seep out and become a sticky mess.

    There are only about 2 or 3 true boiled linseed oils on the market anywhere in the world. One is Watco "Tried & Tru" oil that is made from a recipe that is a coupla hundred years old. It's a difficult and costly method of processing the oil so it isn't very widely used. The rest of the market of "boiled" linseeds actually have petroleum distillates in them to aid in drying. That's the shortcut technology provides. They are OK but can leave an oily odor for some time.