Dismiss Notice

Psst... Ready to join TalkBass and start posting, make new friends, sell your gear, and more?  Register your free account in 30 seconds.

main differences between innovation's 140B and jargar's?

Discussion in 'Strings [DB]' started by chipsas, Feb 28, 2005.


  1. chipsas

    chipsas

    Feb 28, 2005
    Europe, Lithuania
    so, what are main differences between innovation's 140B and jargar's? i can't make up my mind, which strings could be better for me.. tried corelli, and eudoxa strings. eudoxa's are still on my old german double bass.. and they're pretty close to what i'm searching..:)
    i'm looking for a warm, rich, non-metal sound.. and play mostly arco.
     
  2. Francois Blais

    Francois Blais Supporting Member

    Dec 11, 1999
    Québec, Canada
    Innovation's 140B use a synthetic core and are quite thicker than regular steel strings. That may involve nut and bridge groove adjustments.
    I found them to be of so-so craftmanship.
    Jargars are steel, and available in three gauges. I'd choose them over 140B's without hesitation (but that's only my opinion!), furthermore if you're playing mostly arco! (not a bit of metallic quality in these)
     
  3. chipsas

    chipsas

    Feb 28, 2005
    Europe, Lithuania
    hmm, so jargar's are more melodious compared to innovations i guess?
    and what about tension? are they loud enough for egz. jargar's dolce in orchestral tuning? or maybe they are recomended just for solo or jazz playing? i play mostly symphony music in orchestra, and solo.. so i consider if it's good to play with these both.. solo, and in orchestra, m, what you think?
    i'm afraid a little bit that jargar's dolce in orchestra tuning could be very weak.. but maybe i'm wrong?
    you know, it's very discomfortable to change every time strings..for solo.. but.. if you must, you must!:)
     
  4. Francois Blais

    Francois Blais Supporting Member

    Dec 11, 1999
    Québec, Canada
    Jargar Dolces are thin enough for solo-tuning, but can be used at orchestra pitch, although you may want to raise the action a bit.
    They are louder than many other orchestral solo strings tuned down at orchestra pitch. (thinking of Pirastro Flexocor '92)
    More melodious then 140Bs?
    To me they're darker, if that means anything versus melody.
     
  5. chipsas

    chipsas

    Feb 28, 2005
    Europe, Lithuania
    thanks man! i think i will follow your suggestion:) but i really still doubt about what of 3 jargar string types could be better for me..
    darker- it's ok,.... !
    i mean "melodious"= gentle, soft, silken voice..:)
     
  6. Francois Blais

    Francois Blais Supporting Member

    Dec 11, 1999
    Québec, Canada
    Following your definition of melodious, the Jargar are definitely the winner.
    Which gauge to use?
    You were talking about solo and orchestra playing. The Dolces would fit both, and have the softest tone.
    The more tension you choose, more brilliancy and sustain you'll get (although with Jargar, even the Fortes are still very warm), but also more stiffness and forget about solo-tuning with Fortes!
    The Fortes E&A can be somewhat muddy.
    I'd stick with Dolces or Mediums.
    But if you intend to tune at solo pitch, I'd pick the Dolces.
     
  7. chipsas

    chipsas

    Feb 28, 2005
    Europe, Lithuania
    yep, i'll probably try dolce strings.. i still worry that they can be too weak for me in orchestra tuning though..
    just one thing aroused my curiosity, how can they sound like gut strings? jargar's are steel strings after all.. :rolleyes:
     
  8. Francois Blais

    Francois Blais Supporting Member

    Dec 11, 1999
    Québec, Canada
    They are loaded with dampening stuff, between the inner core and outer wrap, which removes all metallic overtones. (some kind of synthetic stuff and also probably silk)
    The warmest steel string I know!
     
  9. chipsas

    chipsas

    Feb 28, 2005
    Europe, Lithuania
    m, i see.. thank's for all info man!
     
  10. bdengler

    bdengler

    Jan 23, 2000
    New Albany, Ohio
    Sorry to intercede here, but I have a Jagar related question. They seem to feel buttery to the hand and to the bow; as I read someone's posting on talkbass at one time, he said you can draw the bow any where and still get a decent sound (that is, no scratching, etc.). Jagars are very dark and have a very rope like sound. I love 'em, especially on my bass that tends to be bright. But I have one question: do you folks know whether Jagars are lighter in tension than say, Helicore Medium orchestrals??

    Thanks, Brian
     
  11. Francois Blais

    Francois Blais Supporting Member

    Dec 11, 1999
    Québec, Canada
    The contruction is so different between the Helicores and the Jargars, and without actual tension measurements, it's hard to tell.
    I think the Jargars have lower tension, but their design may make them feel stiffer.
    Tension and stiffness are different things although related at some point.
    Also note that Jargars are available in three gauges, like Helicores.
     
  12. kwd

    kwd

    Jun 26, 2003
    silicon valley
    I am considering Jargars next in my perpetual string experiment. I play mostly arco but I want something that will pass for jazz. Will going from Corelli 380XFs to the Jargar Fortes be a big adjustment? Reading between the lines, I gather that the pizz sound and feel is not much different that the Helicore Orch(arco) strings -which can be ambiguous and thuddy.
     
  13. Francois Blais

    Francois Blais Supporting Member

    Dec 11, 1999
    Québec, Canada
    I'd say the Jargars are even more thuddy.
    It's an arco string, with a tone similar to gut.
    Corellis are quite bright in my book.
    Corellis vs Jargar would be like day & night I think!
     
  14. kwd

    kwd

    Jun 26, 2003
    silicon valley
    Thank you for the reply. You just saved me $125.
     
  15. bdengler

    bdengler

    Jan 23, 2000
    New Albany, Ohio
    I agree with Francois. I think the Corelli's would make a better "hybrid" string than Jagars. Jagars are wonderful to bow but they are very "thuddy" for pizz. Corelli's do a nice job with pizz. They are brighter, but not strident when bowed, like Spirocores. Plus Corelli's speak easy under the bow (of course, so do Jagars).

    Brian
     
  16. LouisF

    LouisF Supporting Member

    Apr 21, 2003
    Los Angeles, CA
    It seems to be my string comment day, as I just put my 2 cents in on the Corelli 370 thread. As to the "night and day" -- I have both -- Jargar mediums on a small, carved chamber music bass and the corelli's on a large hybrid bass made by Adrian Giormenti in Buenos Aires.

    The Jargars give the smaller bass more body, a very dark sound (which I like) and a very smooth and buttery to play. The Corelli's give the big bass real clarity and focus. Both are very easy on the hands IMO.