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making a resume

Discussion in 'Off Topic [BG]' started by xcental34x, Feb 23, 2006.


  1. xcental34x

    xcental34x

    Feb 28, 2003
    Memphrica, TN
    So I quit my job today, and I'm trying to get a new one. In today's job market, I know most places require a resume, and, often, the better the resume, the better chance you have at getting the job. I've followed Microsoft Word's basic resume format, which includes sections for "objective,""education," and "work experience." Any have any tips to creating a good resume?
     
  2. Marlat

    Marlat

    Sep 17, 2002
    London UK
    It depends on what sort of job you are after, but in my experience most professional roles want a plain, unformatted resume of no more than 3 pages in length.

    Personal details first
    Education history & academic achievements (chronological order)
    Work history (reverse chronological order)
    - description of your role
    - key responsbilities
    - achievements
    - skills learned / applied
    - for each job you go back in history, put a less detailed description but DO NOT leave out any job or missing period

    Finally, have an "Other information" section with details like computer skills, interests, hobbies, associations etc but don't go over the top. The employer doesn't care about your made photoshop skillz unless its a graphic design job.

    Finally, resume's should be written in third person.

    Check out a website like www.hays.com they are likely to have some good tips on there.
     
  3. SuperDuck

    SuperDuck

    Sep 26, 2000
    Wisconsin
    As flippant as that may have sounded, it's actually really important! Depending on what type of job you are applying for, ONE typo will cash you out. That's it, next applicant. One typo!

    If you can't take the time to type up one flawless piece of material, you won't be considered for the job. Edit your resume and then edit it again. Have someone else edit it, edit it five more times, have _another_ person edit it, sleep with it under your pillow, and then give it another once over.

    Some people might not recognize a grammatical error, so it's possible to get lucky. Misspelling, however, is not an option!
     
  4. I run a consulting firm and I often help my clients rewrite their resumes for better results. PM me if you'd like some help.
     
  5. MJ5150

    MJ5150 Terrific Twister

    Apr 12, 2001
    Lacey, WA
    The amount of effort you put into a resume is a good reflection of the kind of person you are. When you hand an employer a vanilla MS Word resume.......well, you get the idea. :D

    -Mike
     
  6. Jimbo

    Jimbo

    Dec 4, 2000
    Philadelphia, PA
    i was always told the resume shouldn't be more than 1 page

    -jimbo
     
  7. Marlat

    Marlat

    Sep 17, 2002
    London UK
    I'm in my late 20's and that would be impossible to achieve in any meaningful way. That might be the case if you are going for your first job at McDonalds, but there is no way any professional could have a one page resume that covered both their education and experience in any level of details.
     
  8. MJ5150

    MJ5150 Terrific Twister

    Apr 12, 2001
    Lacey, WA
    Maybe not. You should be able to summarize your skills and qualification for a specific job in one page.

    Then again, I never had "a" resume. Each one was specific to the job I was applying for.

    -Mike
     
  9. Marlat

    Marlat

    Sep 17, 2002
    London UK
    I should say different professions will differ in how they like a resume presented and I agree that your resume should be tailored to the specific job.
     
  10. MJ5150

    MJ5150 Terrific Twister

    Apr 12, 2001
    Lacey, WA
    Yes, true. In my field, a one pager is a sign of an organized person.

    -Mike
     
  11. MJ5150

    MJ5150 Terrific Twister

    Apr 12, 2001
    Lacey, WA
    Yep. There will be people who need more than one page, like Mark above, and in those cases, it needs to be relative information that is well organized. No one really cares about the Blue Ribbon you won 10 years ago for community leadership. :D

    -Mike
     
  12. Thor

    Thor Moderator Staff Member Gold Supporting Member

    Unless they are clever enough to convey that all in one page.
     
  13. Kosko

    Kosko

    Dec 12, 2005
    Buffalo
    My resume is 1 page. Covers personal info, about 5 IT jobs, schooling, programming languages known, extra curricular activities, and an objective.

    A good cover letter is important. You don't want EVERYTHING in the resume though, you want to allude to it. That is you want the employer to be like, "Wow, theres a lot here, I need to bring them in to talk about this stuff"

    Also, sentences are your enemy now. Maybe one or two complete sentences, in your objective. The rest should be bullet points. Use hot words too, language specific, telecommunications, words that search engine used for resumes would pick up.

    At the beginning of summer I sent out a two page paragraph style resume with full sentences, no replies no jobs. I changed the resume, honestly working a couple hours a day on it and the cover letter, working with at least 3 other people revamping it. Got it down to one page with a cover letter, got interviews, got jobs, got to pick the one I wanted. Its really that simple and that important.

    Just think about how busy a manager is, and the hiring manager too. You need something to snag there attention at first glance.

    Also be careful of your tags. That is Microsoft word works on tags. Such as, do you know the difference between hitting return and holding shift and hitting return? The best thing to do is to make it in a layout program (Indesign, Quark), although not everyone has access to those. In Microsoft word theres a little symbol that looks like a P with another line through it. If you click that it'll show you all the tags in the page. It'll show you all the extra tabs, spaces, wrong types of returns and everything. Good managers will look at this, especially in the design and tech fields.

    Really remember, this is your first impression that the company sees. And if it makes you feel better, I said my resume could NOT be shortened past 2 pages. If you want to look at it, I could probably post it.
     
  14. Jimbo

    Jimbo

    Dec 4, 2000
    Philadelphia, PA
    i was just saying what they tell us every year here at school. i don't know what the proper length should be

    what KoskoArts said about "hot words" reminded me of this file my sister had once sent me, it was a list of "power words" for your resume. it's bascially a bunch of nice sounding verbs you could use. PM me if you want me to send it out to you

    -jimbo
     
  15. I'll post some basic tips. I've sent out a lot of intern apps lately, so I have an active resume.

    • Post adequate contact information on the top. Name, email, address, phone number, fax number? etc.
    • Put your name at the top in a relatively large font.
    • Use sans serif fonts for the headings, serif fonts for the text. Using bold on headings can be useful as well.
    • Bullets are useful. So are indents. Lists in general are a good way to organize
    • Know you're audience: Eg if you're looking for an internship on capital hill, don't put that you spent last summer working at McDonald's.
    • References with a phone number are a plus.
    • Complete sentences aren't necessary. You can start sentences with a verb in past tense.
    • If you have to submit it electronically, .PDF can score you points.
    • See if you can get it down to a single page. Cut out unnecessary things, and adjust margins accordingly if it looks like it's close.
     
  16. Thor

    Thor Moderator Staff Member Gold Supporting Member

    And don't spell like Davidoc on your resumé.

    :bag:
     
  17. Really?!?!? :confused:

    Sounds like you're on to something...

    :p :bag:
     
  18. xcental34x

    xcental34x

    Feb 28, 2003
    Memphrica, TN
    OK. As of now, I think I've, got a suitable resume (Yes, it is only 1 page), and I've compiled a list of jobs (mostly customer service/call center) to pursue. My final concern before sending out my resume is I'm wondering if an "objective" is really important to include within the resume. In my opinion, I see no real point to it, as the objective of a resume is pretty clear. So should I include an "objective," and what sort of wording should I put for this?

    Thanks for all the help so far.
     
  19. What's an objective?
     
  20. AspiringBassMan

    AspiringBassMan

    Dec 10, 2005
    UK
    i think he means profile.


    xcental34x

    make the objective brief - about 20-30 words to summarise. its basically something like this: "i am a professional [insert trade] with over 30 years experience. i am dedicated, have a logical and analytical mind and have the drive and enthusiasm to see a preoject though to the end without fail".

    btw when you applying, its best that you find out the name of the person to whom you are pplying to. its betetr to addres them by anem rather than putting Dear Sir/Madam