Making It Big

Discussion in 'Miscellaneous [BG]' started by rickbass, Mar 2, 2001.

  1. rickbass

    rickbass Supporting Member

    I recently found out from a friend, who is, er, was, a radio program producer and DJ, that his job will be wiped out because the parent company, Empire Broadcasting, is going to total automation. He will be used for recordings of voice-overs and ads, though.

    If/as this trend continues, what happens to the phenomenon where someone hears an mp3 online, phones in to a radio station to play it, and the band hits the big time, (Creed, et al)?

    In your opinion, how does an artist make it big these days?

    Are we still in the days of sending in a tape/CD to an AR guy and hope they are in a good mood when they listen to it, (IF they listen to it) ?
  2. I tried to get the rock station here (92.3 WXRK K-Rock) to play an mp3 of this awesome canadian band but they wouldn't b/c they weren't signed. =P
  3. Boplicity

    Boplicity Supporting Member

    I just read an interesting article right along this line. The article is titled "Artists Hope Satellite Radio Brings Better Exposure, by Craig Havighurts, staff writer for The Tennessean.

    The crux of this article says "studies show that just three formats--country, adult contemporary and news-talk--constitute MORE THAN HALF the nation's radio stations."

    More than half...!!! How is an unknown independent musician or band going to get air play in a situation like that?

    So, the article outlines the one shining hope for those shut out by computer generated corporate playlists.

    That hope is Digital Audio Radio Service which is soon to be suppiled by two companies. For $9.95 a month, one can receive one hundred digital radio stations a month , half music, half talk, through radio, cars, homes and portable devices. Digital information about the songs will be on the screen, song title, composer, performer, label, etc.

    Digital radio will offer a vast increase in variety of music played. "Niche music such as early jazz, folk, reggae, and alternative country usually isn't profitable and is relegated to public stations."

    "Analysts at Merrill Lynch predict DARS will revolutionize radio attracting a $155 billion dollar market by 2009."

    In my own home I have DMX digital audio music I pay for through my cable TV company. Each channel plays a different style of music, and it is commercial-free 24/7. One problem, though, there is no way to request songs, performers or give feedback. Though there are many genres including blues, reggae, acid jazz, urban beat, jazz classics, children's. orchestral, pop hits, etc., there is no Latin music channel, but I have no way to appeal for such a channel. DMX selects the playlists, not listeners.

    Still it is a darned sight better than my car radio..that I HATE and do not listen to because I strenuously object to listening to all the ads. I just won't do it.

    Back to your point. If you and other artists who have been closed out by the format of today's present commercial radio stations can find a way to get into the DARS format, you may have a far better chance than you do now. Heads of independent lables are looking to DARS as a chance to get vital exposure denied to them now, but I can see that if DARS is strictly controled by these two providers, it may quickly fall prey to closing out unknown artists just as much radio does today.

    It is all about access and who controls it.

  4. rickbass

    rickbass Supporting Member

    Really interesting, Jason. Thanks. I didn't know about DARS (another good reason to be at TB, huh?)

    Not that I think it's a bad thing and not to get into another Napster rave, but what you said makes me think about what David Groll of Foo Fighters said on the (HBO) Dennis Miller Show. "I don't want to have to pay a f#%$*n nickel every time I listen to the radio, man."

    And what you said about, "access and who controls it," ...remember the days of payola radio??? :eek:
  5. I was giving this some thought a few days ago, and I seem to have arrived at the conclusion that record companies are fast becoming a thing of the past. It seems to me that record companies evolved out of necessity, ie. the need for musicians to have their music heard, in an era when the only avenue for doing so was a) radio, & b) record sales. There was, then, no other means (save for live appearances) to get your music out there. Technology has changed all that and my belief is that musicians will eventually see the light and steer away from the almighty AR in favor of the more direct approach that is digital audio sales over the internet. The music industry isn't changing, it HAS changed. The broadcast industry will have no choice but to fall into place.
  6. If, by making it big, you mean getting signed to a big label, there's an adage I producer once told me:

    "It's not who you know, its who you blow"

    (sorry if that's offensive)

    If you mean gaining exposure and making a living from your music, then its definitely in the realm of possibility. There are several bands around here that are doing well.

  7. Personally, I dont want to "hit it big", I would much rather prefer being a local punk band, and play shows at local venues.
  8. o think to make it big you basically have to know people!! one of my old friends are now sighed to warner brothers, she sing like fiona apple **** and play the piaon which is cool but even that isn't good enough!! i also met some one from sony and someone from mtv looking fro talent!! it's weird but it seems everytime that happens my band breaks up!! damn always at the bad moments but it all in who you know and how good you band is!! all about the fan base!! if you have one then you have a beter chance then most people!! also it seems you have to have a look, i live in pa there is a bunch of rednecks and i have to care about how i look i don't get it!! it's ok i don'tlook like then anyway i am 18 and still wearing over sized cloths and piercings where i can get them!!