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Man....What should I practice?

Discussion in 'General Instruction [BG]' started by gfdhicool, Nov 2, 2013.


  1. gfdhicool

    gfdhicool

    Jun 8, 2012
    I feel like I'm stuck in a void (I haven't been able to advance much in like the past week)

    I've been playing for 1 year and 5 months.

    I've pretty much got ear training down (I usually stick to 1 band per month on learning songs,since I don't wanna get all jumbled up).This month it's Iron Maiden and I already learned all their epics before and the little bass solos in a few of their songs(The Number of the Beast,etc)

    I taught myself theory (I don't really want a teacher,since I like discovering things on my own).I know what chords are,the major scales,and a few arpeggios,and I can read music just fine.

    I'm currently learning slap (I'm not really into funk,but I do love the Chili Peppers and I wanna eventually learn a few songs by ear from them),and maybe It'll be useful

    I'm using a few drum loops to start coming up with my own lines,since I do actually plan on forming a band once I'm 18 and have money for better gear.

    I know a bit of blues,so I may try to expand on this? I play a lot of Elvis Presley,but that's all the blues I know

    What can I practice? I wanna grow...I don't wanna stay the same :(.
     
  2. adi77

    adi77 Banned

    Mar 15, 2007
    bombay
    u could try out some songs by the beatles or brazilian girls or any band with a great bass player u could practice reverse slap with index and middle finger on higher strings u can make ur own arpeggios or u could compose new material or u can just play along with songs u like.. playing with other people helps as well, try out music from other countries, movie scores... etc etc etc etc... theres a lot of stuff almost endless... and be a relentless bastard about it:) it took me 15 years to find the right kind of music and people. be open to anything new.. i used to be stuck up about people showing me stuff to do with the bass or music in general.... its the schmuckiest thing i hv ever done... hope this helps.... peace
     
  3. njcioffi

    njcioffi

    Oct 12, 2013
    It's been my experience that advances in musicianship come to me in fits and starts. I have a sort of renaissance, followed by a plateau of kind of uninspired....practice?....drilling? Whatever. But it's kind of like a video game....you grind along, then sometimes you realize you've 'leveled up'.

    Keep playing, keep listening, and probably most important, play with others. I would have never built up the dexterity and stamina to cross over from a fretless bg to an upright had I not been afraid of looking like a wimp, or just plain sucking in front of others.

    But most of my musical breakthroughs have come from finding new and interesting lines o weave through what others are playing. Surrounding yourself with musicians who are on your level, or even slightly better than you, can be a heck of a motivator.
     
  4. fearceol

    fearceol

    Nov 14, 2006
    Ireland

    That's fine and it's your choice, but it will take you twice the time to discover things when working alone. The very fact that you dont know what to practice or discover, goes to show the disadvantages of learning on your own. IMO a half a dozen or so lessons from a good teacher would get you back on the straight and narrow. After that, you could go back to working alone until you reach the next plateau. Then go back to the teacher for a "kick start". You said you "have money for better gear"....a small portion of it spent on lessons would be a very good idea IMO.
     
  5. nouroog

    nouroog

    Jan 14, 2010
    Lyon, France
    Man, like it has been better said above, do yourself a favor and find a good teacher. Even with one lesson per month, you will save YEARS in your progression.
    And you will still discover lots of things by yourself.
    And play play play with other musicians, whatever the style or the instrument they play.
     
  6. AaronVonRock

    AaronVonRock

    Feb 22, 2013
    Bangkok
    Start playing with a drummer and guitarist.
     
  7. gfdhicool

    gfdhicool

    Jun 8, 2012
    I might consider lessons now xD.I feel like I've accomplished a crap load in a year and 5 months ,and I don't know what to practice anymore xD
     
  8. gfdhicool

    gfdhicool

    Jun 8, 2012
    I was about to actually be in a band,but another bass player that played the open E string more got to join.They thought my playing was too technical for the music (Death Metal).
     
  9. fearceol

    fearceol

    Nov 14, 2006
    Ireland
    I'm sure that you have accomplished a lot in the short time you have being playing. However, people who have being playing bass and learning for half a lifetime will readily admit that they have still a lot to learn.

    I am quite sure that you wont regret getting one to one lessons.


    Best of luck with them. :)
     
  10. gfdhicool

    gfdhicool

    Jun 8, 2012
    Soloing isn't really my thing,only if it really fits the song (Steve Harris does this a few times).I'm more of a rhythm guy,but yeah I do wanna make a living once I'm older xD
     
  11. gfdhicool

    gfdhicool

    Jun 8, 2012
    You are so correct.I'll stop trying to believe that I have "learned it all",ill try getting lessons,maybe the teacher can recommend me chord books or something xP
     
  12. fearceol

    fearceol

    Nov 14, 2006
    Ireland
    I have seen it posted here on TB that a lot of teachers work through Hal Leonard's "Bass Method" books with their students. There are three volumes and all three can be bought in one spiral bound edition.
     
  13. AaronVonRock

    AaronVonRock

    Feb 22, 2013
    Bangkok
    If you are in a metal band, open E is your friend. Embrace him.
     
  14. JimmyM

    JimmyM Supporting Member

    Apr 11, 2005
    Apopka, FL
    Endorsing: Ampeg Amps, EMG Pickups
    Yep, time for a good teacher. Good on you for reading, BTW. Call your local college or talk to your high school band director and find yourself a serious teacher who uses jazz concepts to teach.
     
  15. bobicidal

    bobicidal

    Mar 28, 2013
    San Jose, CA
    +1
     

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