1. Please take 30 seconds to register your free account to remove most ads, post topics, make friends, earn reward points at our store, and more!  

MarkBass cab - tighter bottom end

Discussion in 'Amps and Cabs [BG]' started by ficelles, Oct 28, 2018.


  1. ficelles

    ficelles

    Feb 28, 2010
    Devon, England
    If I have a criticism of my MarkBass 102p Traveller cab it is that it is prone to boominess and I am often dialling low end out to compensate, especially on wooden floors. So I was thinking of an HPF but thought I’d try a simpler and cheaper option, which has worked surprisingly well:

    B8B5085C-8316-45F3-BC6A-77A6E7724F85.
     
  2. woodyng2

    woodyng2 Supporting Member

    Oct 4, 2015
    Oregon Coast
    The old decoupling trick! (Yes it does help.)
    Markbass makes and sells a small wedge for the same purpose.
     
    Al Kraft likes this.
  3. ficelles

    ficelles

    Feb 28, 2010
    Devon, England
    I have that device but for me it tilts the cab too much - a spare set of cab feet has worked much better :)
     
    Al Kraft and woodyng2 like this.
  4. I’m all for simple innovative ideas, and this looks like a winner.
    I just can’t help but wonder if the boominess is just being directed where you don’t hear it, which idn’t all that bad.
    If the HPF is used to control boominess and help protect from low end over excursion, then you solved half the problem. If excursion isn’t an issue, then yeah! Pretty good idea.

    I’m no expert in acoustics. My questions are not a knock on your idea.
    The question just came to mind, but not in a judgmental way.
     
    Al Kraft likes this.
  5. Al Kraft

    Al Kraft Supporting Member

    May 2, 2016
    Northern Virginia
    There is certainly some mechanical decoupling there that often makes a huge difference, I suspect the acoustic boundary reinforcement coupling is virtually unaffected. This means you get a problem solved without creating another one!
     
  6. ficelles

    ficelles

    Feb 28, 2010
    Devon, England
    I reckon the basic problem lies in the integrated plastic feet - great for stacking cabs but resulting in too much floor contact.
     
    Al Kraft likes this.
  7. Would the speaker dispersion couple to the floor in a front firing configuration be more the issue than floor contact?
    It seems that if it were about floor contact only, that you have a lot more coupling with the speaker lying on it’s back. The feet don’t provide much contact surface area.
    Would it be more about raising the cab above the floor in a front firing arrangement, and an up firing cab is the ultimate form of decoupling from the floor?
     
    ficelles likes this.
  8. Al Kraft

    Al Kraft Supporting Member

    May 2, 2016
    Northern Virginia
    My guess is that for very low frequencies the only way you can truly decouple is to get elevation above the floor with the specific height being a factor related to the specific frequencies you were decoupling. For the very low omni-directional frequencies I do not believe the orientation of the driver itself would be tremendously significant. I'm admittedly out of my element here so I could be 100% wrong!
     

Share This Page

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.