marking your BASS

Discussion in 'Setup & Repair [DB]' started by Joe Taylor, Sep 13, 2002.

  1. Joe Taylor

    Joe Taylor

    Dec 20, 2001
    Tracy CA
    Have any of you ever marked your bass? I got a new bass with only the builders label on the inside if I ever had to say "Hay that's my bass" I could not prove it. You know as in it was stolen or something like that. Also, I was thinking that who ever owns it a 100 years from now might be interested in who had it first. I'm not on a ego trip about this I just wonder who owned the bass' that I have played in the past.

    I was thinking of glueing a paper label whith my name and some number next to the existing label.

    What do you all think?
  2. I take photographs of unique details of my basses.
    Grain patterns, scratches, old repair marks, they're as individual as your own marker.
  3. Gabu


    Jan 2, 2001
    Woodland Hills, CA
    Pictures are good... And most basses would have a serial number.
  4. The minor expense route would be to have a certificate done by a luthier/appraiser. A certificate reads kinda like an appraisal but is much more detailed.
  5. Henry


    Sep 26, 2002
    Proprietor of Superior Bassworks
    I have my name written on the bottom of my bridge feet. One side says "Charlie, 1966" and the other has my name, and 2002.
  6. arnoldschnitzer

    arnoldschnitzer AES Fine Instruments

    Feb 16, 2002
    Brewster, NY, USA
    I've seen a lot of old school basses with names and/or initials scratched right into the wood. That would seem to be a classy solution...
  7. erik II

    erik II

    Jul 11, 2000
    Oslo, Norway
    On my hybrid bass, some previous owner has carved "BP" in 5-6cm letters deep into the fingerboard :eek:. Well, it's way down at the end of the FB, so it's not in the way.

    I think I would place any permanent markings on the neck heel between the fingerboard and the top. Nice and discreet.
  8. kip


    Sep 11, 2002
    Sausalito, Ca
    I use one of them chips they put in cars w/ GPS.
    Then, when I forget where I left my bass on Saturday nite I can find it before church on Sunday morning.
    Seriously, this isn't out of the question.
  9. Bob Gollihur

    Bob Gollihur

    Mar 22, 2000
    New Joisey Shore
    Big Cheese Emeritus: Gollihur Music
    Check out - from their web site:

    The word Snagg refers to the tiny microchip now available to manufacturers and approved aftermarket retrofitters for implantation into musical related gear, which we refer to as an Asset. The Snagg® Microchip or RFID (radio frequency identification device) is pre-programmed with a 10 digit alphanumeric code number that when scanned or "activated" emits a code number unique to that asset alone. The chip itself, about the size of a grain of rice, requires no power source and is expected to have a shelf life of over 100 years. Attempted removal of the Snagg would, in most cases, ruin the instrument or greatly reduce it's market value.

    The cooperation of Law Enforcement is a key element to our recovery system. We have enlisted the aid of the California State 2nd Hand Dealer Investigators Association (CSDIA) and the National Association of Property Recovery Investigators (NAPRI) in designing our Internet Database System. Snagg supplies scanners free of charge to all major cities, any Law Enforcement Agency requesting them and to all agencies in our Snagg Dealers territory.

    Through a system of major manufacturers, such as Fender Musical Instrument Company and Gibson Musical Instruments, Snagg Certified Dealers, luthiers and law enforcement, we will quickly cover a major portion of the U.S. with product and scanners.
  10. kip


    Sep 11, 2002
    Sausalito, Ca
    Reply to Bob.

    This is excellent information.