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Marshall & Wem amps on Blind Faith vid

Discussion in 'Amps and Cabs [BG]' started by chadds, Dec 5, 2006.


  1. chadds

    chadds

    Mar 18, 2000


    Rick Grech has a huge foam mute under his J bass strings. You can hear what an accomplished drummer Ginger was in those days.
     
  2. Ginger Baker was definatly an amazing drummer, even if a tad mental (i supose he is a drummer tho!)
     
  3. brianrost

    brianrost Gold Supporting Member

    Apr 26, 2000
    Boston, Taxachusetts
    The WEM gear is the PA.
     
  4. Rwm8088

    Rwm8088

    Nov 17, 2006
    Florida
    I saw the WEM cabs in a few Cream vids, it looks to me like they used them more as monitors than anything.
     
  5. In the 60s Fender Jazz Basses used to arrive with a strip of foam rubber under the bridge cover as did the Jazz Bass I bought in 1966; I met Rick in the early 70s when he and Albert Lee were guesting with the 'Crickets', Rick was minus the foam and using a Dual Showman.
    WEM gear started out as 'Watkins' a company formed by a brilliant electronics guy called 'Charlie Watkins'. Charlie produced the 'Watkins Copycat' tape echo unit.
    Wem also produced one of the earliest on the road mixing desks, in the late 60s most music festivals this side of the pond used stacks of 4x12 WEM PA columns.
    My very first amplifier was an 8 watt Watkins Westminster.
    Charlie is getting on in years and not enjoying the best of health but I did get the chance to have a chat with him about 15 years ago, he was a true gentleman.
     
  6. Wow, thank you for that video link! They were one of my all time favorite one-album bands from my youth, and I've never seen anything of them live before. Orgasmic, man...
     
  7. Man, they sound wasted:rollno: Sloppy, bad time, clams... wow.... it's amazing what passed for a 'super group' back in the day:meh:

    Cool clip from an historical perspective, though.
     
  8. They'll be remembered for what they were a short lived but brilliant band. whereas you;...........who?........ well!


    :spit: :p :rolleyes: :crying:
     
  9. Ha! Good point! I don't care what anyone says though, that bass player (at least on that clip) is pretty bad (or at least VERY stoned... which might be the case:D ).

    However, as a counterpoint, Ashley Simpson is much better known than I am also..... I'm not sure that is a reflection of talent or 'quality' musicianship:p

    Edit: As a further point... compare this performance with a Booker T. recording (same instrumentation) from the same period. Hmmmmmm....... quite a difference!!!!
     
  10. Well, things WERE different back then, for that group of musicians and the demographic they were playing for. I believe that all except for the bass player were probably quite busy that year, what with Cream touring and breaking up, and Traffic having a relatively new LP out. People were nuts for music with a good vibe back then, and as far as that crowd (the newly stoned "rock" audience), they weren't all that picky about endings and such. Plus I think it was a bit of an impromtu performance (and choice of song, as it sounds). I don't remember the details, but they were also probably in the strains of breaking up as well.

    Clapton should've never left John Mayall's Bluesbreakers.
     
  11. Warr Tapper

    Warr Tapper Banned

    Sep 17, 2006
    Work
    Ginger Baker is the most overrated drummer of all time. Really nothing special. All Hype
     
  12. Well, things WERE different back then, for that group of musicians and the demographic they were playing for. I believe that all except for the bass player were probably quite busy that year, what with Cream touring and breaking up, and Traffic having a relatively new LP out. People were nuts for music with a good vibe back then, and as far as that crowd (the newly stoned "rock" audience), they weren't all that picky about endings and such. Plus I think it was a bit of an impromtu performance (and choice of song, as it sounds). I don't remember the details, but they were also probably in the strains of breaking up as well.

    Clapton should've never left John Mayall's Bluesbreakers.

    Booker T. and his crew were crack session players, not hippie lifestyle anti-establishment folk heroes (or whatever). It wasn't all about market share and spit & polish and do what the Man says. It was much more organic and grass roots oriented, and people enjoyed it as part of the great selection of things available at the time, as part of the huge societal liberation that was going on. The Beatles' performance on the roof of Abbey Road Studios had its moments of slop too, and who knows what we didn't see or hear! It's a different measure is what I'm tryin' to say. You didn't even have this huge subculture of over-informed, perfectionist, hyper-educated pop/rock/jazz/etc. musicians like what developed by the mid to late '70s and is practically the norm today. Then, it was more innocent, human and internal, today it's more external and calculated. We pays our money; we makes our choices.
     

  13. +1... your post makes much sense. I have always been a Clapton fan, and also Stevie Winwood. My post was meant to be a little more 'tongue in cheek' than as it came off:) .

    They just seem SO wasted though. As a player who came up in the early 70's, I unfortunately know what that was all about. We actually thought it made us sound good:eek: :rollno: However, as you said, it was a certain time and vibe that seemed to spawn a lot of 'free' playing and looseness. It sure was a lot of fun, except of course for those who either didn't make it out, or are still battling substance abuse, etc.

    I always think of the old joke:

    Q: 'What does a Deadhead say when he runs out of acid'?

    A: 'This band sucks' :D
     
  14. Rick Grech was certainly not a bad Bassist in fact he was excellent; I can't imagine Clapton, Baker or Glen D Harding (Elvis Presley/Emmy Lou Harris bands) working with him had he not been so. There was an enormous amount of substance abuse going on around that time, when I met Rick around 1973 during his stint with the Crickets he was in great shape and playing very well, many bands were fragmenting and new bands seem to come and go (Blind Faith Being to name just one) as the top guys would get together for a while, some went on to form superbands such as Roy Wood (ELO).
    A good freind of mine was at that gig he said the whole weekend was an amazing experience.
    What we must also appreciate is how old we are now, and how old they were then, and how long they had been playing. I'd been gigging 7 years by then probably same as some of those guys.
     
  15. greenboy

    greenboy

    Dec 18, 2000
    remote mountain cabin Montana
    greenboy designs: fEARful, bassic, dually, crazy88 etc
    I didn't look at the vid, but I used to spin the Blind Faith vinyl. Some good playing and writing there - too bad they didn't make it past a short time. Actually I don't see why all the disses here (or need for drug/drink abuse explanations either - on the "record", at least, they acquitted themselves well). In the context of the time they were strong musicians when seen among their peers ... technical ability with instruments and tunesmithing was not an area they were considered shakey in and they seemed to connect with a lot of people emotionally without jettisoning musically ambitious tendencies.

    ... Today I look at Clapton and Baker with longtime fave Bruce on the ROYAL ALBERT HALL DVD and they seem to get back to what was strong and real during their younger days. Maybe I'll put on the old Cream and Traffic recordings too. It's certainly more involving fare than much of the smoov jazz stuff today, more adventurous than a lot of no-good-solos-and-no-improv-interplay-all-powerchords stuff that makes it into the indie/alt categories or pop movie soundtracks.

    Now don't think I'm an old guy, but I'd also rather listen to Billy Cobham SPECTRUM or Mahavishnu INNER MOUNTING FLAME or BIRDS OF FIRE or Miles' BITCHES BREW and all that stuff leading into Headhunters than a lot of the glossy instrumental elevator music today. Take me right past all THAT and give me raw PUNK or some technical METAL for that matter.

    OK. Seemd like a rant, dintit? ; }
     
  16. KJung--

    +1 on your post!
     
  17. greenboy+1 on your reply.

    To get it into context Steve Winwood (Keyboards vocals Blind Faith) was all of 15/16 yrs when four years earlier he was turning out the vocals on these hits with Spencer Davis Group 1965/6/7.
    Keep on Runnin.
    Somebody help Me Please.
    Gimme Some Lovin.
    I'm A Man.

    Thanks very much chadds for placing the Video, took me back.
     
  18. zazz

    zazz

    Feb 27, 2004
    Cebu


    i liked that track....lets not get sloppy and laidback mixed up here.:bassist:
     
  19. "It's already written that today will be one to remember..."
     
  20. jasonbraatz

    jasonbraatz

    Oct 18, 2000
    Oakland, CA
    BF is one of my favorite albums of all time. :)
     

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