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Matt Brewer - Greg Osby's wiz kid

Discussion in 'Bassists [DB]' started by Geeibish, Feb 4, 2006.


  1. Geeibish

    Geeibish

    Jan 30, 2006
    Clemson, SC
    There's this new player in NYC playing with Greg Osby named Matt Brewer, and this guy is really something. He has a huge, agressive, natural sound combined with incredible feel, style, and accuracy. I got the new Osby album, "Channel Three," and was just blown away by his playing. All the tracks are incredible, but the ones that really impressed me were the first one "Mob Job (an Orenette tune)" and the second one "Vertical Hold." I after hearing the album, I found that Matt was only 21 years old when he recorded it, which is the type of thing that makes the rest of us want to quit. I strongly reccomend that every bassist listen to this guy, 'cause he's gonna be something to talk about in the near future. :eek:
     
  2. Aaron Saunders

    Aaron Saunders

    Apr 27, 2002
    Ontario
    Hey, where's this guy from originally? That name is really familiar.

    EDIT: Nevermind, found his site -- www.mattbrewerbass.com
     
  3. Jeremy Allen

    Jeremy Allen Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Mar 18, 2002
    Bloomington, IN
    If I recall, he was one of the first bassists in the Juilliard jazz program (an "Artist Diploma" program open to talented undergrads or grads; it started up just a couple of years ago, like maybe 2002). I heard him once or twice in New York when he was a student there, and he sounded great; and for those of you considering higher education in jazz, take heed of what a high-profile program like the one at Juilliard can do for your career--there's nothing like being in New York and playing with the big cats as a student! (If you can get in to the program to begin with...)
     
  4. jazzbass72

    jazzbass72

    Jun 26, 2003
    New York, NY
    Matt Brewer is an amazing bassist. Indeed, he quit Juilliard after a year, when he got the gig with Osby. Just like Christian McBride did, some 10 years earlier, after he got snatched by Bobby Watson, Freddie Hubbard, Wynton, etc.

    Patitucci didn't even finish his bachelor's degree at Long Beach State, if I remember correctly. Lovano and Scofield dropped out of Berklee as well. Dammit, all my jazz idols dropped out of school, or didn't even go to college in the first place, and look where they all are now :D

    yes, maybe real life playing experience is the best teacher of all!

    -Marco
     
  5. Aaron Saunders

    Aaron Saunders

    Apr 27, 2002
    Ontario
    Marco...don't have some pretty SWEET gigs and lead a career as a pro jazz musician in New York ;)?

    College has done ye well.
     
  6. jazzbass72

    jazzbass72

    Jun 26, 2003
    New York, NY
    Hmm, to be *real* honest, college connections account to about 20% of my present gigs. Maybe less, actually. I think I learned most of what I know right on the bandstand, and from my CD collection :) They said that getting a master's degree would really help my career. To this date, I haven't used my degrees at all... people seem to be more concerned with the way I play and with how professionally I carry myself, as opposed to asking me about what degrees I have. I suppose that the degrees are a necessity only for those who plan on making a living as teachers, not performers.

    Just my $0.00000002, nothing more.
     
  7. Geeibish

    Geeibish

    Jan 30, 2006
    Clemson, SC
    I agree with Aaron Sanders, Marco. After looking at your website, you career is something to be jealous of. I only hope that I can have a career like yours in the future (in NYC, no less).

    Back to the original subject of this thread, Matt seems to have come from a situation where the stars aligned just right. Both his parents are jazz musicians and educators, and he has been exposed music since he was born. Personally, I didn't start listening to jazz until I went to high school. In fact, my mother hates jazz, which I find to be somewhat ironic.
     
  8. Jeremy Allen

    Jeremy Allen Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Mar 18, 2002
    Bloomington, IN
    When I whip out my framed certificate announcing my master's degree in jazz performance at a session to let everyone know how good I am, all I get in return is laughter...and I paid $30K for that? ;)

    Of course one's musicianship is the only thing that really matters--Boston and New York are full of musicians with graduate diplomas in music who will never get a second call because they really aren't all that great, and when one plays with heavy cats they don't stop to ask for your credentials.
    That said, I can relate pretty much every high-profile jazz thing I've done on the east coast to the connections I made with teachers in Boston and New York whom I never would have met had it not been for school and who hooked me into an amazing network of musicians after we had worked together in an academic setting. (Thank you, Bob Brookmeyer, John Abercrombie, Bob Moses, George Garzone, George Russell, and Danilo Perez--I consider my tuition dollars to have been well-spent!) Once removed from that network (as I am now, back in the Midwest), I have to do things on my own, and of course it works out fine but it takes a little more time because you have to open the doors on your own instead of having them opened for you. (And of course it goes without saying that the most important thing is what you do once the door is opened; whether or not you opened it or a mentor gave you a boost is irrelevant if you can't deliver the goods once you get through.) I always tell my own students that this is an important thing to consider when looking at where to go to school, and that although the cream will always find a way to rise to the top it's a pretty good idea to put yourself amongst the highest levels of talent you can (in terms of fellow students AND teachers AND professional scene in general).
    I had brought it up as an aside, but I should say that in the case of someone like Matt Brewer I didn't mean to imply that where he went to school guaranteed him success--that dude was going to get with the heavy cats no matter what! Just like John Sullivan, the freakishly-talented bassist in Roy Haynes' group--he went to the New England Conservatory for maybe a year or two and then split for New York because he was simply ready to play at the highest level.
     
  9. jazzbass72

    jazzbass72

    Jun 26, 2003
    New York, NY
    Hey Johono5,
    since your profile and all of your posts seem to be anonymous, I gotta ask: do you happen to be Jeremy Allen? If that's the case, I love your bass playing on Brookmeyer/Wheeler's CD "Island"! If for any reason you don't want to reveal your identity here, feel free to reply me with a PM, an inquiring mind (mine) wants to know :D . I was in Boston from 1999 to 2002... I knew John Sullivan then, and I was wondering why we never happened to meet in Beantown.

    -Marco
     
  10. Jeremy Allen

    Jeremy Allen Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Mar 18, 2002
    Bloomington, IN
    Hi Marco,
    Yep, that's me, Jeremy Allen. I'm not anonymous on purpose, it's just that when I finally registered here on TB it was to post a "for-sale" ad for my bass (JOe HOlovnia NO. 5) and I've been stuck with the stupid name since then...(I guess I can put my name in my profile, come to think of it.)
    Hey, thanks for the compliments on the CD! It was very fun to do, and I'm glad to know that someone out there actually owns a copy.
    I was in Boston from 1999-2001, and although I think we never met I remember musicians raving about your playing back then--if I would send a sub or recommend someone for a gig who turned out to not be very good, people would say "Man, don't you know about Marco Panascia or Massimo Biolcati? Call them next time!"
    It sounds like you're having a good time in New York, and speaking of the school thing (to get back on topic, I guess...) I'm seeing all kinds of names from the Boston of that period. In addition to John Sullivan's success, I keep hearing about Walter Smith and Kendrick Scott and Ferenc Nemeth and Jason Palmer, and an alto player whose name I forget but who was playing in the Mingus Big Band and touring around with some cool people. There's a lot of talent coming through Boston, and watching it mature (or fail to, in come cases!) is very interesting.
     
  11. jazzbass72

    jazzbass72

    Jun 26, 2003
    New York, NY
    Ta-da! I knew it :) Glad to see you here, Jeremy! I got an email from my old friend Sara Leib a couple of weeks ago, mentioning about a gig in the city that you were on (wow, quite a trip, from Bloomington to NYC!). Too bad I was out in Los Angeles, playing at Catalina's with Eldar. That would have been a great opportunity to meet up and hang.

    You're welcome! The interviews were great to watch, too. I am a big Brookmeyer and Wheeler fan myself. One of my Berklee projects was to transcribe "How deep is the ocean" from the Brookmeyer/Mads Vinding duo record (trombone and bass). I am sure you're familiar with that.

    John seems to actually have disappeared in limbo, which is a shame for a world-class talent like him. I think he still has the gig with Roy Haynes, but I *never* see his name in town on gigs of any kind, and his own website (arcobop.net) has disappeared from the 'net altogether. I know he got married a while ago, but that's just about the most recent news I have of him. I should look him up one of these days. I saw a recital of his at Jordan Hall back in 1999, and I was shocked for days... I'd never heard anything like that from a bass before. Were you there? They played Monk's "Evidence", starting it out with some $25 Casio keyboard's drum machine thingy...
    The alto player you're referring to is Jaleel Shaw. Kendrick, Walter and everyone else you mentioned has gone on to great things. The Berklee hang was definitely a great one, that I must admit.

    OMG my apologies for taking this *soooo* off topic! Weren't we talking about Matt Brewer? ;)

    -Marco
     
  12. damonsmith

    damonsmith

    May 10, 2006
    Houston, Tx
    I just saw Matt Brewer tonight. In trio with Lee Konitz and Joe LaBarbra. He was amazing. Huge sound, in tune, creative solos, great time and no amp in good sized hall.
    It was kind of the perfect Konitz concert, solid trio all around. I was not missing Red Mitchell or Sonny Dallas at all.
     
  13. Konitz, LaBarbera, Brewer....mmmm....beer...
     
  14. damonsmith

    damonsmith

    May 10, 2006
    Houston, Tx
    I got Osby's "Channel Three", which is also very solid and interesting contemporary jazz trio stuff. It has really great playing. Not the most ground breaking, but top shelf straight ahead playing.
    Kind of like if Dave Holland's recordings weren't so smoothed out.
     
  15. I'm not a fan of the production on his recording's either, but I hear very few similarities between his stuff and "Channel Three."

    Have you ever heard DH live? That band is very, very far from "smoothed out."
     
  16. damonsmith

    damonsmith

    May 10, 2006
    Houston, Tx
    Yeah, live the band is great. Potter in particular really "sweetens up" on the recordings, live he has a lot of fire.
    The heads in particular on the last few Holland albums get way too close to smooth jazz for me.
    I guess the similarities I heard were inside but interesting tunes with good bass playing - it is a lot more in line with "Triplicate" era Holland.
     
  17. Marc Piane

    Marc Piane

    Jun 14, 2004
    Chicago
    Holland is one of my favorite live acts. I've seen him a bunch of times. Great playing all around.

    I have most of his recent albums. They rarely hit my cd player. His Live at Birdland from a couple years back is really smokin though.
     
  18. milomo

    milomo

    Aug 5, 2007
    Bloomfield, NJ
    Man I love that record. Tremendous playing and a great group of tunes. And just like when Joe Henderson recorded Beatrice on the State of the Tenor record, after Triplicate came out, everyone in NY started playing Segment again. Dave and Jack, to me that's one of the classic rhythm sections in jazz history.
     
  19. Nadav

    Nadav

    Nov 13, 2004
    Atlanta, GA
    I would've loved to see that..
    I just got a recording of Brewer with Yaron Herman. He sounds fantastic. I'll be looking out for other stuff he's on.
     
  20. oliebrice

    oliebrice

    Apr 7, 2003
    London, UK