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meaning of "parallel inputs" on a bass cab??

Discussion in 'Amps and Cabs [BG]' started by lomo, Oct 22, 2013.


  1. lomo

    lomo passionate hack Supporting Member

    Apr 15, 2006
    Montreal
    I've had cad cabs with dual jacks for running in series / daisy chain fashion. My new Shuttle 2 112 cab has 1 primiary speakon jack and 2 1/4" jacks that say "parallel". Does that mean I could potentially plug dual (different) inputs into this cab safely (assuming total power is acceptable)?
     
  2. The vast majority of speaker cabinets the daisy chaining is PARALLEL. Very few, if any, would be a series connection. Going from cabinet to cabinet is just the same as connecting both cabinets to the amp.
     
  3. Dual jacks are not "series", they are parallel. Daisy chaining cabs is running the cabs in parallel. Those connections on the cab are to allow you to parallel a second cab from either the speakon or 1/4". You can ONLY hook up ONE amplifier to the cab.
     
  4. No it does not. All of the jacks are wired in parallel.
     
  5. Ask yourself this: "Could I connect a cable from one amp's speaker jacks to another amps speaker jacks?" Answer, you could BUT then you would have two damaged amps and nothing to play through.
     
  6. lomo

    lomo passionate hack Supporting Member

    Apr 15, 2006
    Montreal
    Thanks. I figured as much, but has never seen the word "parallel" printed on the jackplate.
     
  7. will33

    will33

    May 22, 2006
    austin,tx
    They are just more jacks to connect more speakers, the usual way, meaning the total impedance halves when the cab count doubles.

    What you're calling " series " and " daisy chain " connections are also parallel connections just like these. That means you'll be getting to the same place whether you run 1 cable from amp to speaker 1 and another cable from speaker 1 to speaker 2, or run 2 cables from the amp, 1 to each speaker. It ends up the same.

    The only exception would be some tube amp that have the speaker jacks connected in series inside the amp, to access the correct transformer tap when the second speaker is plugged in.

    Do NOT connect more than one amp to the speaker at any time. That would be an expensive mistake.
     

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