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Melodic solo for church

Discussion in 'Tablature and Notation [BG]' started by Lowtrac, Jun 27, 2007.


  1. Lowtrac

    Lowtrac

    Dec 13, 2006
    Senoia, GA
    I'm a beginning bassist, and I'm looking for an easy to moderately difficult piece to play at church. I've been practicing with the praise band, and we're about to start doing instrumentals during our offering/prayer time. I'd like to play a solo one Sunday, so it needs to be worshipful. I don't think a pop and slap funk piece would really work well. Any opinions?
     
  2. TyronPotamkin

    TyronPotamkin

    Dec 12, 2006
    Any major scale played in full is usually considered melodic depending on how it is played. It starts to turn a bit bluesy when played as a pentatonic scale. Figure out what key the rest of the band will be playing in and use the major scale of that key to solo over.
     
  3. DocBop

    DocBop

    Feb 22, 2007
    Los Angeles, CA
    Just pick a tune you like and play the melody as spiritually as you can. Improvise some on the melody. If you can find a copy of Dave Holland's CD Ones All it is all unaccompanied bass. He does a beautiful version of God Bless The Child as well as other tunes. Marcus Miller's last CD Silver Rain he does the Lord's Prayer mainly on sax, but it will give you an idea of how to just take a melody and embellish on it and that is enough. Even start the tune and have the band join in will move people. It doesn't have to be fancy, if your soul comes thru job done.
     
  4. JKT

    JKT

    Apr 30, 2007
    Buffalo NY
    Endorsing Artist: Barker Basses
    Personally I have had good results from playing some traditional hymns as solo bass numbers. They are easily played, easily recognized and not many expect it in a contemporary setting. You mentioned being a beginner and so that might limit you to a single line type of melodic solo, I'm not sure of where you're at as a player. I have enjoyed coming up with arrangments of Amazing Grace, and What a Friend we have in Jesus done chordally in the upper register.

    If that is a little more than you want to take on, have someone lay down some simple chord pads to one of these hymns and just work the melody. A little chorus and reverb can help you out too.

    JKT :)
     
  5. PinoyBoy

    PinoyBoy

    Jan 9, 2007
    McKinney, TX
    I played "Silent Night" on bass two Christmases ago. It sounded good. You can only play that in December though... :)
     
  6. Tenma4

    Tenma4

    Jan 26, 2006
    St. Louis, MO
    I'll second taking a hymn, and making a chord/melody arrangement out of it. I did this with O Holy Night this past Christmas time at our church. I was pleased at how it turned out. Well...OK, I was pleased with how I played it. It didn't turn out well except for what was coming from my cab because the sound idiot clipped the board with my signal and damaged a stage monitor... Oh well. :bassist:
     
  7. rfclef

    rfclef

    Jan 19, 2007
    Gervais, Oregon
    Most music or christian book stores have books of well known hymns/songs in solo arrangements for various instruments... Find one for Trombone/baritone, cello, tuba, etc... you may have to adjust octaves, but I would think sumpin' like that'd work alright...
     
  8. TheBassBetween

    TheBassBetween

    Jun 25, 2005
    Check out Victor Wooten's Amazing Grace. It's simple, elegant and damn cool.

    I can find you some tabs or powertabs if you need them.
     
  9. Primary

    Primary TB Assistant

    Here are some related products that TB members are talking about. Clicking on a product will take you to TB’s partner, Primary, where you can find links to TB discussions about these products.

     
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