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Messed up input jack

Discussion in 'Pickups & Electronics [BG]' started by Frederic123bass, May 30, 2012.


  1. Frederic123bass

    Frederic123bass

    May 30, 2012
    I just got a used bass, and the input feels easier to plug into than other basses that ive played. Anyways, it doesnt work while both the amp and chord do. How do i fix this problem?
     
  2. scrimjer

    scrimjer

    May 20, 2012
    get to the jack from behind or what ever press the tab down ( the one your patch chord hooks into) if that dosent help check your solder points
     
  3. greggster59

    greggster59

    Oct 31, 2006
    New Jersey
    If you're comfortable with light soldering and trying to fix the jack doesn't work, you can order a new one from Stewart-MacDonald for under $10 and replace it.

    I had to do this with my used Warwick Thumb. The sleeve flange on the StewMac jack was a bit too long so I just trimmed it with a pair of dykes and so far, one year later, it's fine.
     
  4. bassbenj

    bassbenj

    Aug 11, 2009
    It's common for many jacks (it's an output jack) to lose tension. If it's a barrel type jack with no open contacts visible, the ONLY fix is to replace the jack. If it's a standard "switchcraft: style jack that has open contacts on the back side. As scrimjer said you have to get to back side (remove cavity cover or whatever it takes) and you will note these longish metal tab like things that rub against the plug when you insert it. The farthest one is the signal and it rubs on the plug tip. (that rounded knob on the end of the plug. If there is a second one it rubs on the body of the plug and it shorts to ground and acts as an on-off switch for an active bass. What you have to do for a quick and dirty fix is to bend those tabs TOWARD the plug so they put more pressure on it.

    After a while cheap jacks will again lose tension requiring another bending, so often most permanent fix is to just buy a decent switchcraft jack that will keep it's tension to replace the other one.
     

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