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Metal woes

Discussion in 'Band Management [BG]' started by Theonestarchild, Apr 23, 2006.


  1. Theonestarchild

    Theonestarchild Artfully lost

    Aug 23, 2005
    North Carolina
    I started my first rehearsal with my new band today. I like AC/DC, Kiss, Van Halen, and stuff like that. These are my influences. At rehearsal today, I had to play Children of Bodom. I HATED it. Especially with the lead guitarist cranking his stack with so much distortion. I absolutely hate playing the genre. The rhythm guitarist and me decided to drop the lead guitarist today and re-evaluate our influences. He was down to the point where he didn't want to make the band work anymore, and I am to the point where I'm willing to hop onto someone else's train. I like the rhythmist though. So my questions are :

    Does anyone else find heavy metal to lack music?
    How should I handle this situation?
    How can I drop the lead guitarist and still be his friend?
    How do I recover and make everyone in the band want to play?
     
  2. 8mmOD

    8mmOD

    Mar 20, 2005
    USA
    I endorse & use Tech 21 pedals, Eminence loaded cabs, EMG pickups, Jim Dunlop picks & Ernie Ball Strings, BC Rich Basses.
    You tell the guy "I like AC/DC, Kiss, Van Halen, and stuff like that. These are my influences. I dont like playing the real heavy stuff"

    If your rhythm guitar player feels the same way, than say "We" instead of "I" and let the lead guy make his own choice to change or leave.

    Believe me, there are worse situations to be in, it will work itself out. :)
     
  3. IanStephenson

    IanStephenson UnRegistered User

    Apr 8, 2006
    >Does anyone else find heavy metal to lack music?
    By metal you mean "nu" metal - yeah it sucks. Actually some of it is OK if you don't take it too seriously, but there's too big a difference between what you're listening to and the new stuff


    >How should I handle this situation?
    >How can I drop the lead guitarist and still be his friend?

    Tell him how you can't make the band what he wants it to be. Find a nice death metal band for him, and tell him that you're sad so see him go, but understand he needs to explore new things without you...

    >How do I recover and make everyone in the band want to play?
    You've got a rhythm guitarist - so just go out for beers with the band (minus missfit), pick three TOTALLY smokin covers you all love, and turn up at the next rehersal ready to totally burn playing music YOU want to play.

    Ian
     
  4. Lewi_wilko

    Lewi_wilko

    Mar 24, 2004
    This is kind of what happened in my band. We had a guitarist who just wasnt on the same wave leingth as the rest of the band. This guitarist was fixed only only doing either iron maiden or dragonforce songs in the band and he was realy stubborn aswell and used to get realy angry. Anyway after a few months of playing gigs without iron maiden or dragonforce songs this guitarist left and turned quite bitter.

    I would say just tell him he is not realy into the same stuff as the rest of the band.
     
  5. You are at a very interesting point in your band's development - oddly enough, what seems like a difficult situation could actually be one of the turning points in your band and in your playing, if you look at thtis the right way.

    You are not really so much faced with a selection of which songs to play, but rather how you want your band to sound. Once you have defined your band's sound and style, you can play anything you want in your own ORIGINAL way.

    I suggest you take a serious look at how you want to sound and how to achieve that sound. Most young players don't really think too much about how a band gets the sound they do - Why does Van Halen sound different than Metallica? Have a serious discussion with your band as to how you want to sound and how to get there. Then you have to start experimenting with different approaches to your songs. It is hard work, but it can also be very interesting.

    Most of the players I have known have never really given much thought on how to create a sound image for their bands - they just pick songs and play them with each player defining their own sound. By focusing on the sound of the band rather than the specific songs you play, you very well might be able to solve your problems and improve your band tremendously.
     

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