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micing cab (for recording)

Discussion in 'Amps and Cabs [BG]' started by cubeenz, Feb 3, 2003.


  1. My band is recording this Saturday (our first time doing so), and I was wondering what everyone's experience with micing a cab for recording has been. It's a StingRay through an SVT3-PRO and SVT 4x10. What settings work best, compared to playing live? And what are opinions on micing vs. DI vs. mixing both together?
     
  2. Petebass

    Petebass

    Dec 22, 2002
    QLD Australia
    Our last recording was at a major studio and the engineer had definite ideas on how to record bass:

    1) DI
    2) Mic close to one of the 10" speakers.
    3) Mic about 2 metres away to pick ALL the speakers.
    4) Room mic as far away from the cabinet as you can get it.

    Put the amp in an acoustically dead room.

    It gave the producer plenty of options for the final cut. But after all that mucking around, the DI was the best sound IMO. The pruducers disagreed and used a lot of the miced tracks on the final cut.
     
  3. What Pete said....

    Insist on at least 2 tracks, one DI and one mic. Then insist on using either an AKG D112, Beyer M88, or Sennheiser MD421 microphone (any self-respecting studio/recording facility will have at least one of these).

    There will be desirable qualities in the DI tone, and there will be desirable qualities in the mic'd tone.

    Don't know how you should set your amp, someone else may have advice on this.

    Oh - BTW - your strings (roundwounds) should be new with a few hrs. playing time on them. Brand-new out-of-the-pack strings are a bit tooooooo bright, and old dead ones are... old and dead.

    May your recording experience be full of glee and cheer.

    b
     
  4. Petebass

    Petebass

    Dec 22, 2002
    QLD Australia
    oh yeah strings - Blimp's right. Brand newies are not only too bright, but they don't stay in tune no matter how much you stretch em. You can be slightly out of tune live and barely notice, but there's something about recording than acts like a microscope for things like this that.

    Leads, make sure they're working and noise free. And make sure there's planty of instant coffee in the cupboard.
     
  5. Trevorus

    Trevorus

    Oct 18, 2002
    Urbana, IL
    What I did was I used a DI with a good effect that had some good EQ. I haven't mic'd the cab, but I wish I could have. Eden Speakers sound awesome, and I kick myself for not really using it. Just try a few things. A good studio and even good home recording units allow you to try multiple takes. One I have used, the Boss BR-1180CD. It has virtual tracks, so you can try multiple takes, cut and paste, and see which works best. Any reputable studio can let you try that.
     
  6. monkfill

    monkfill

    Jan 1, 2003
    Kansas City
    It seems like a lot of it would depend on your tone in general. If your personal tone relies on, say, a tube head and a cabinet that both add their own color to the sound, you're not going to want to go with a straight DI.

    I'm thinking its similar to the mix you hear on live albums by any given band. Its a mix of soundboard feed and mics out in the venue. The soundboard lends the crispness and clarity, but the mics out in the audience really give the recording life.
     
  7. Phat Ham

    Phat Ham

    Feb 13, 2000
    DC
    Check out homerecording.com. The people there probably have a lot of experience with this type of stuff.

    I also suggest using both a DI and a mic. A lot of times using a mix of the two signals gets you the best sound.
     
  8. Munjibunga

    Munjibunga Total Hyper-Elite Member Gold Supporting Member

    May 6, 2000
    San Diego (when not at Groom Lake)
    Independent Contractor to Bass San Diego
    I think you're better off ratting a cab than micing it. Mice just don't get the same tone as rats.
     
  9. Jerry J

    Jerry J Supporting Member

    Mar 27, 2000
    P-town, OR
    Kind of a deviation from the main thread, sorry.

    ...but what is everybody using for their DI? I just bought an Avalon U5. Lord knows what I was thinking. But has anyone used the U5?

    BTW, who's got mice in there cab? :D
     
  10. BassPulsar

    BassPulsar

    Oct 16, 2002
    Portugal
    Hi Jerry,

    Why do you say "Lord knows what I was thinking". Do you like it or not?
    I've read alot of good reviews about this DI, and I´m thinking of getting one!!!

    Thank you!!

    (sorry to the original poster for getting completely out of the theme!!)
     
  11. BassPulsar

    BassPulsar

    Oct 16, 2002
    Portugal
    Hi Jerry,

    Why do you say "Lord knows what I was thinking". Do you like it or not?
    I've read alot of good reviews about this DI, and I´m thinking of getting one!!!

    Thank you!!

    (sorry to the original poster for getting completely out of the theme!!)
     
  12. :D:D
     
  13. seamus

    seamus

    Feb 8, 2001
    Jersey
    Not liking the U5? or was it just the price tag that prompted that comment? ;)

    I would think the Avalon rates among some of the best direct solutions for bass. I agree with one of the posts above though, there will be desirable, and undesirable factors given the DI vs. mic'd cab scenarios. DI is great for clean, solid bottom plus more control over transients in the final product, but can sometimes come off sounding sterile too IMO. That's where a mic'd signal lends some help.

    Just for reference, I've used the Sans Amp BDDI in the past for a direct solution both live and in the studio. Though I prefer the tube pre/ss power combination in my rack, sometimes it's just easier to get right into the board instead of futzing with cabs, mics, levels, etc. Compromise? Most definitely, but then, for a simple demo, direct has been a pretty stable solution.

    No mice in my cabs...at least, none that I'm aware of. :eek:
     
  14. crud19

    crud19

    Sep 26, 2001
    Missouri
    If you like the sound of your amp, insist that it be mic-ed up. Don't let a pushy engineer or producer convince you that you HAVE to have a DI. If your amp is part of your sound you should capture it on tape. If the studio you're going to can't handle that, you should consider someplace else. There is no substitute for a good sounding amplifier, thoughtfully mic-ed (not "throw an SM57 in front of it). Also, if you're recording digitally, you might consider a little compression to tape, so that you can get a higher level to tape without clipping. Remember that in the digital world, the higher the level to tape (or hard disk, or whatever) the more resolution (or information) you record. Some compression can help with this, but too much can kill your tone and dynamics.
     
  15. Jerry J

    Jerry J Supporting Member

    Mar 27, 2000
    P-town, OR
    I just got the Avalon yesterday and haven't really had a chance to play around with it. It really is pretty awesome looking and feeling.
     
  16. Jerry J

    Jerry J Supporting Member

    Mar 27, 2000
    P-town, OR
    Yes it's a bit on the $pendy side but it's a very nice unit. I'm going to try some home recording, direct, with it and see how it works out.

    I do need to figure out how to carry it. I don't really want to rack it. I wish that Avalon made a nice bag kinda like the one that was made for the Eden WT-300.
     
  17. BassPulsar

    BassPulsar

    Oct 16, 2002
    Portugal
    Can you give some feedback about the U5?
    What does it sound like when recording? And thru an amp?
    Can you show us some sound clips?
    I really am interested in getting this DI. I own a BDDI and I am very happy with it (for recording and live) and I would like to know if the U5 is a step forward!!!
    Thank you vey much!!

    (once again I apologize to the original author!!)
     
  18. Munjibunga

    Munjibunga Total Hyper-Elite Member Gold Supporting Member

    May 6, 2000
    San Diego (when not at Groom Lake)
    Independent Contractor to Bass San Diego
    Hey Jerry ~

    I bought a U5 last year, and it is SUPERB for going direct into the board. About four of the six tone presets are suitable for bass. It gives extremely clean, quiet signal out. I also bought a Countryman Type 85, and it sends the bass signal unaltered to the board. It's cool to use when you feel like getting your tone with the bass's on-board EQ. Both of these DIs are the boobies.

    I carry mine in an SKB 1615 small mixer case. It's a tight fit for the height, but it fits well in the pick'n'pluck foam.
     
  19. Jerry J

    Jerry J Supporting Member

    Mar 27, 2000
    P-town, OR
    I just got the U5 so I've got to workout with it a bit to be able to answer the questions.

    I'm not familier with the BDDI so can't say if it is a step up. I do know that the Avalon is built incredibly well. I do wish that it had a power on/off switch though.

    I've got a small road case type thing that I got at Harbor Freight that might work just fine. I don't really want to rack the thing.

    I apologize to cubeenz for the change in thread. I hope that you were able to get enough info to help you out for your recording session.
     
  20. RobOtto

    RobOtto

    Aug 15, 2002
    Denton, TX
    I can never tell if Munji is being serious or not. :p