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More on Edgar Meyer

Discussion in 'Bassists [DB]' started by anonymous0726, Aug 20, 2004.


  1. anonymous0726

    anonymous0726 Guest

    Nov 4, 2001
  2. Marcus Johnson

    Marcus Johnson

    Nov 28, 2001
    Maui
    Finally, we can lay that whole fingerboard dot issue to rest!

    Turns out he was goofin' on us.
     
  3. anonymous0726

    anonymous0726 Guest

    Nov 4, 2001
    As much as he watches his left hand when he plays I would think that he probably does get some use from them.
     
  4. Johnny L

    Johnny L

    Feb 14, 2002
    Victoria, TX
    I think that the most important thing that has been layed to rest is Edgar's uncompromising attitude regarding playing together with others - including rhythm and intonation - and his irreverance towards the more superficial issue of dots (or any other markings) on the fingerboard.
     
  5. The 1981 competition in Cincinnati, mentioned on the website, was the first (or nearly the first) International Society of Bassists conference and competition with Barry Green as one of the principal organizers. I attended but, being fairly new to DB, did not, could not, compete. Edgar Meyer was the clear standout classically. I believe John Clayton won the jazz competition, Dave Friesen competed, and a young Chicago bassist, whose name escapes me at the moment, played beautifully in the competition and went on to do many recordings. Rufus Reid gave a lecture about "the pulse", Eddie Gomez did a performance with flutist Jeremy Steig, and the most riotous speaker was Milt Hinton--just a hilarious bunch of stories and some of meanest, most complex, slap bass I've ever heard then or since, and Milt never lost a note of musicality throughout it all. It was a great introduction to the new guy (me) with his Kay bass and no car.
     
  6. Great Edgar stuff Ray...Thanks Man!
     
  7. anonymous0726

    anonymous0726 Guest

    Nov 4, 2001
    I love the part about violin being ' kind of a nasty' instrument!
     
  8. Bubbabass

    Bubbabass

    May 5, 2004
    SOMD/DC/VA
    Heard the final round of that 1981 competition. Edgar actually shared first prize w/another guy, but to my ear he was head and shoulders above the rest. It was the first time I heard him. It still remains one of the most spellbinding performances I ever heard. You could have heard a pin drop in the hall as he played the prelude to Bach's second cello suite at pitch. Any cellist would have been proud to have done as well. John Clayton played a killer bowed solo on a ballad in the jazz finals. Want to say it was Body and Soul, but don't quite remember. Would have been cool to hear him as a classical competitor too.

    So a year later both Edgar Sr and Jr show up in my section in the Knoxville S.O. during our summer season for the World's Fair. Shared a stand with Sr. He was a great guy and a fine player. Had a big English bass with two sets of grooves in the bridge to switch quickly from 4 to 5. Warming up for a rehearsal of Mozart 39, I heard this tremendous roaring up and down the scale backstage, and my first thought was, "what are we playing with Pepper Adams as guest soloist?" It was Edgar just doing his thing. He may have been 20. You knew he was going to hit it big.

    Just watched the DVD that comes with Edgar and Bela Fleck's new CD. One of those dots lines up with the 17th fret, and his fingers are right on it. Others appear to line up with 9, 12, and 24. Some great shots of Bela's chops, too.
     
  9. anonymous0726

    anonymous0726 Guest

    Nov 4, 2001
  10. Hey Bubba, Noticing your mention of Pepper Adams who I happened to work with, I checked your profile....very interesting. The fact that you play a Prescott, and have studied with many of the worlds leading teachers....listing Lee Morgan and Brownie as some of your major influences, and that you're principal bass with the Air Force Strings, I'd like to welcome you to TBDB!
    I know this is off topic, but i'd like to hear a little about you.....any chance?
     
  11. godoze

    godoze

    Oct 21, 2002
    You hep cats have got to see "Obstinato" the DVD that came with Bela and Ed's Cd. I picked it up at their philly show. To me it is a good representation of two ver y great musicians struggling with ego's and trying to perfect an incredibly difficult piece by the end of the tour.

    Time well spent.
     
  12. anonymous0726

    anonymous0726 Guest

    Nov 4, 2001
    I have the trailer on my PC. I like the bit about, "I think you should be able to play it in metronomic sequence."

    :)
     
  13. godoze

    godoze

    Oct 21, 2002
    that was a good line - along with " I don't think it should matter when I'm rushing."
     
  14. I saw that on TV.....it really was great!
     
  15. Bubbabass

    Bubbabass

    May 5, 2004
    SOMD/DC/VA
    Paul, thanks for the welcome. This place is almost as good as hanging out over a pitcher after the gig. I'll be brief, since we're talking about E here.

    I'm fortunate to have a gig that pays a living wage plus bennies for playing bass.

    Studied with Bob Gladstone, Paul Ellison, Scott Haigh, and Hal Robinson for periods ranging from two months (Ellison), to two years (Gladstone and Haigh). Was happy to learn from these guys. Each held a vital piece of my puzzle.

    Bounced around the minors for some years--Toledo, Principal in Knoxville, Assistant Principal in Harrisburg, Principal in Akron, Associate Principal in South Bend. Started making the cut for bigger jobs in 1985, and won my present one that year.

    Always liked trumpet and sax, those are the kind of lines I hear.
     
  16. anonymous0726

    anonymous0726 Guest

    Nov 4, 2001
    Toledo? You probably know my father -- Gene Parker?
     
  17. Bubbabass

    Bubbabass

    May 5, 2004
    SOMD/DC/VA
    Sat in with him a few times. Most recently on my birthday this year. I remembered him as mainly a sax man, but he was playing some hot keyboard that night. Lou Marini Jr just happened to be in town and fell by the club, too. What a treat for a $3 cover. You probably played some at Rusty's, I imagine. How about with John Mast, Claude Black and Jim Gottron?

    Speaking of Rusty's--one Saturday with the TSO (in 1980), we were getting ready to rehearse a pops show with George Shearing, and in walks Rufus Reid to back him up. Dayum! He was very gracious, put up with my incessant questions, came to hang at Rusty's after the show and turned out to a buddy of that night's headliner, Ernie Krivda. Cool memories sprout here and there.
     
  18. anonymous0726

    anonymous0726 Guest

    Nov 4, 2001
    I grew up at Rusty's! The club is gone now. 1961 - 2004 was a pretty good run.

    All the names you mention are as familiar as family! I've played countless hours with all of those guys. Mast and Black were two of my earliest 'Drill Instructors' (both notoriously hard on bass players)...