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more scales

Discussion in 'General Instruction [BG]' started by SnoMan, Feb 25, 2001.


  1. SnoMan

    SnoMan Words Words Words Supporting Member

    Jan 27, 2001
    Charleston, WV
    OK, I'm looking to further my use of different scales in music, I know most major and all blues. Where can I find good instructions about other scales. Also, please go ahead and list some names of any scales you enjoy or prefer.



    Shawn
     
  2. JMX

    JMX Vorsprung durch Technik

    Sep 4, 2000
    Cologne, Germany
  3. Not exactly what you want to hear but, forget about scales, learn chords and how they move around.
     
  4. JMX

    JMX Vorsprung durch Technik

    Sep 4, 2000
    Cologne, Germany
    "I never play scales" - Joe Pass (freely quoted)
     
  5. cassanova

    cassanova

    Sep 4, 2000
    Florida
    a great book for scales is "The Bass Guitar Scale Manual" its got more scales in there than you can shake a stick at. It also has progressions to help you to better utililize the scales and give you an example of what you can do with them.
     
  6. Jeff Bonny

    Jeff Bonny Supporting Member

    Nov 20, 2000
    Vancouver, BC
    The Ray Brown Bass Method has everything you need. It goes through all the essential scales and how to practice them. Even if you become a "chords" guy you need to have a working knowledge of scales and Ray's book is one of the few scale books that's worth more than the price of the paper it's printed on. Every serious student should own it regardless of whether they play upright or bass guitar.
     
  7. Boplicity

    Boplicity Supporting Member

    If you are interested in an Internet site that has scales and the chords that go with those scales, go to:

    http://www.activebass.com

    Click on "The Bassics". You may choose any scale, any chord and even hear how it sounds.

    JO
     
  8. Interesting comments here. How can you learn scales without chords, and vice versa? Chords are manufactured from scale degrees, so you cannot learn about chords without learning about scales.
     
  9. Boplicity

    Boplicity Supporting Member

    Learning chords without learning the scales from which they are generated would be like building a house with no foundation or taking a trip to parts unknown without a map. Scales are the anchor of the chords or the parents of the chords. Just my opinion.

    JO
     
  10. Jeff Bonny

    Jeff Bonny Supporting Member

    Nov 20, 2000
    Vancouver, BC
    Check the last half or so of this recent thread
    http://www.talkbass.com/forum/showthread.php?s=&threadid=12472
     
  11. I disagree with Marty and Jason on not being able to learn scales from chords and that chords come from scales, I'd say it's the other way around.

    I'm not saying that you shouldn't learn scales but you can learn all the scales you want and you still won't know what is their use. Learn chords, their directions and the relation between each of them and you will be able to see a song as an ensemble that makes sense. When you have a lead sheet in front of you, the chords are written, not the scales. Chords will determine what scales you can use and which notes to emphazize on. Scales tell you nothing except scales you can use.

    Before someone says "yeah, but chords only have a limited number of notes". Well, simply add extensions and you got all the notes you want! In real life playing, play those notes not in arpeggios and you have a linear passage. I read parts of that other thread and really liked the "chords with passing tones".
     
  12. Bruce Lindfield

    Bruce Lindfield Unprofessional TalkBass Contributor Gold Supporting Member

    I agree with Erik's emphasis - in that if you're starting out, it's more important to know chords and what their function in the music is. But I would disagree that chords with extensions will give you all the possibilities. There are some scales which don't really come from any chord or it's extensions and if you just stick to chord tones - even if they are 11, 13 then you will eventually be limited and hit a brick wall.

    If you know what notes in the chord are essential to maintain the "sound" or function in the harmony, then there are going to be scales you can use, which fulfill "minimum requirements" in terms of functionality, but have no relation to the structure of the chord at that point. Things like diminished/whole tone scales can be used over Dominant 7 chords but you wouldn't "deduce" these from simply looking at the chords involved. You just need to know the scales.

    I think as bass players accompanying the music, then concentrating on chords is probably the best focus, but if you are ever going to play solos that are up to the "standard" of a sax or trumpet player then you need to knwo about the alternative scales as well.
     
  13. SnoMan

    SnoMan Words Words Words Supporting Member

    Jan 27, 2001
    Charleston, WV
    I would like to thank you all for your input, it's truely appreciated. Any and all others are greatly appreciated.


    Shawn