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More Shuker 6 X 2 progress porn!

Discussion in 'Basses [BG]' started by Richard Lindsey, Jun 24, 2003.


  1. Richard Lindsey

    Richard Lindsey

    Mar 25, 2000
    Metro NYC
    Some of you may recall I've got a pair of 6s (fretted and fretless) on order from Jon Shuker. Seems we're on the home stretch now, so I got some piccies of the body and the FB. Here's the top, with all but the last coat in place.
    It's amboyna burl, and I think it's kinda yummy.
     
  2. Richard Lindsey

    Richard Lindsey

    Mar 25, 2000
    Metro NYC
    Here's the back. This is African walnut. The way it came out was a bit of a surprise to me. When I think of walnut, I tend think of darker colors, as in black or claro walnut. But this stuff is more of a tawny, golden color. I like it! Dunno if it's a "true" walnut or not. It's not from the Juglans genus, so probably not, but I'm not picky. IIRC, it's actually Lovoa trichiloides or something like that.
     
  3. Richard Lindsey

    Richard Lindsey

    Mar 25, 2000
    Metro NYC
    Here's a side view showing how the two woods go together, with a thin black veneer layer between them.
     
  4. Richard Lindsey

    Richard Lindsey

    Mar 25, 2000
    Metro NYC
    Here are the FBs. Ebony, both. There was a little extra real estate on the end, so Jon put on 25th and 26th frets for me. I know, wretched excess, and I won't be visiting that neighborhood much, but what the heck. I actually think they look fairly natural there. You can't see the neck itself, but it's 7 piece maple and wenge. The face of the headstock will be amboina as well to match the body.

    Dang ... my fingers are itching ...
     
  5. Bryan R. Tyler

    Bryan R. Tyler TalkBass: Usurping My Practice Time Since 2002 Staff Member Administrator Gold Supporting Member

    May 3, 2002
    Connecticut
    Looks like they'll make a great couple :)
     
  6. That back looks a lot like sapele (Entandrophragma cylindricum), which I've heard called "African mahogany" but not "African walnut". There's a photo of a Perretta acoustic guitar back made of sapele here--you'll see what I mean: http://www.perrettaguitars.com/smp_sapele.htm

    Anyway, I beleive it's rather "mahogany-ish" in weight and tone, too, but is obviously a lot mroe striking to look at. Should make a great pair of basses!

    Mike
     
  7. Richard Lindsey

    Richard Lindsey

    Mar 25, 2000
    Metro NYC
    Yeah, I see the resemblance. I have to say, wood nomenclature can get really confusing when you start chasing down the various alternative names. I've seen the same popular name applied to different genus-species combinations, and of course the same genus-species often has different popular names.

    Now, just to add to the confusion, what *I've* heard called African mahogany is not sapele but the various species of the Khaya genus!
     
  8. Bryan R. Tyler

    Bryan R. Tyler TalkBass: Usurping My Practice Time Since 2002 Staff Member Administrator Gold Supporting Member

    May 3, 2002
    Connecticut
    One thing I used to be confused on was the difference between horse chestnt and Buckeye burl; Larry from Gallery Harwoods recently informed me that they're the same thing, but people have given them different names over the years.
     
  9. mgood

    mgood

    Sep 29, 2001
    Levelland, Texas
    Well, whatever you call it, looks like some very sweet basses.
     
  10. +1! Very nice!
     
  11. pilotjones

    pilotjones Supporting Member

    Nov 8, 2001
    US-NY-NYC
    That does look nice! I imagine with the matching pup covers and headstock it will be fantastic.

    Here's wood info from the USDA Forestry Service:

    --------------------
    Wood Technical Fact Sheet

    Lovoa trichilioides

    syn. L. klaineana

    African-Walnut

    Lovoa

    Tigerwood

    Family: Meliaceae

    Other Common Names: Mpengwa (Ghana), Anamemila, Apopo, Sida (Nigeria), Bombulu (Zaire), Dibetou (Gabon, Ivory Coast), Congowood, Tigerwood (United States).

    Distribution: West Tropical Africa from Sierra Leone to Gabon; occurs in evergreen and deciduous forests, preferring moist sites, tends to be gregarious.

    The Tree: May attain a height of 150 ft; boles straight and cylindrical, clear to 60 to 90 ft. trunk diameters to 4 ft above short buttresses.

    The Wood:

    General Characteristics: Heartwood yellowish brown, sometimes marked with dark streaks or veins; sapwood buff or light gray, narrow, clearly demarcated. Texture fine to medium; grain usually interlocked with an attractive ribbon figure; lustrous cedarlike scent.

    Weight: Basic specific gravity (ovendry weight/green volume) 0.45; air-dry density 34 pcf.

    Mechanical Properties: (2-cm standard)

    Moisture content Bending strength Modulus of elasticity Maximum crushing strength

    (%) (Psi) (1,000 psi) (Psi)

    Green (9) 8,200 1,060 4,320

    12% 11,900 1,340 6,990

    12%(44) 12,600 NA 6,400

    Janka side hardness 690 lb for green material and 940 lb for dry. Amsler toughness 195 in.-lb at 12% moisture content (2-cm specimen).

    Drying and Shrinkage: Dries fairly rapidly with little degrade, existing heart shake may extend. Kiln schedule T6-D2 is suggested for 4/4 stock and T3-D1 for 8/4. Shrinkage green to 12% moisture content: radial about 2.0%; tangential about 5.0%. Movement in service is rated as small.

    Working Properties: Easy to work but sharp tools are required to avoid tearing, particularly when machining quartersawn faces. Good gluing properties, moderate steam-bending properties.

    Durability: Heartwood is rated as moderately durable, liable to dry-wood termite attack. Sapwood liable to powder-post beetle attack.

    Preservation: Heartwood is rated as extremely resistant to preservative treatments; sapwood is moderately resistant.

    Uses: Furniture and cabinetwork, decorative veneers, paneling, joinery, shop fixtures, gunstocks.
    -------------------

    Marleaux uses this wood quite a bit, calling it Dibetou.
     
  12. Richard Lindsey

    Richard Lindsey

    Mar 25, 2000
    Metro NYC
    Thanks, Peter! I didn't know this was the same as dibetou, which I had in fact heard of somewhere, though I hadn't knowingly seen it.

    Unfortunately, no matching PU covers; they'll be the basic Basslines black, but that will tie in with the ebony FB and the black hardware.

    I'm also considering some wooden knobs from THG Knobs, maybe ebony with amboyna burl caps, or even just straight ebony with an inlaid marker.

    www.thgknobs.com

    But if I do that, I'll just take care of it on my end rather than having Jon do it, since Jon's in the UK and I'm here--it seems to make sense to cut down on the back-and-forth across the pond. Jon's gonna send me some of the scraps from the same piece of amboyna used for my tops, so I can send those to THG if I nake the decision to get the knobs.
     
  13. mark beem

    mark beem Gold Supporting Member

    Jul 20, 2001
    New Hope, Alabama
    Nice!!

    Keep the pics coming!!
     
  14. JP Basses

    JP Basses

    Mar 22, 2002
    Paris FRANCE
    SO Richard...

    Any word on those twins ????

    More pics please :D


    Peace,
    JP
     
  15. ceeprm

    ceeprm

    Jul 15, 2002
    Edinburgh Scotland
    I'm probably going to see your basses soon as I will be down at Jons workshop to pick up mine after the UPS damage- thats if he hasn't already sent them to you. Also going to check out one of his jazzs which are supposed to be nice....
     
  16. Richard Lindsey

    Richard Lindsey

    Mar 25, 2000
    Metro NYC
    No, not yet, aaargh! Actually, last I heard, everything was finished except for a couple of details. First, Jon was waiting for a local stringmaker to send him two custom sets of strings I ordered for these basses. (He likes to string up the basses and let them "settle in" for a week or so before doing a final setup and sending them out.) Second, Jon was waiting to get his lathe set up in his new shop so he could try his hand at making me some solid amboyna burl knobs for the basses. He hasn't done these before but seems to think it's possible. (I hadn't thought of this option when I originally ordered the basses; in fact, I got the idea from seeing a couple of *your* basses and then finding out about Roger's site.)

    You can bet I'll put up some new pics as soon as humanly possible!
     
  17. Richard Lindsey

    Richard Lindsey

    Mar 25, 2000
    Metro NYC
    Hey, you'll probably see them before I do!;) Tell me what you think when you do.

    Had you heard that Jon's moving his shop? I don't know if he's fully moved into the new place yet, but I know he's started to shift some of the stuff over, and he has to be out of the old place by the end of the month. AFAIK the phone # is the same for now, though--(0)1246 866404--if you want to give him a shout and find out for sure.

    The J Basses certainly look nice. If he has any of the 24 fret J models there, I'd be curious about your thoughts on upper fret access, especially on 5s and 6s. I've always had a love for Js, and I really contemplated ordering a couple, but I wasn't sure about the ease of accessing frets 22-24 (not that I spend a lot of time up there, but it's nice to have the access when you need it).

    Hope your bass turned out well--I'm sure it will, I believe Jon to be a very conscientious guy who truly wants his customers to be happy.
     
  18. ceeprm

    ceeprm

    Jul 15, 2002
    Edinburgh Scotland
    I think he should have moved into his new shop by now- I'll definately go down to collect the bass rather than have it shipped. I think he should have a jazz bass in stock and I'm either going to get one of those or have him build me a upright.... I tell you what I think of the jazz- ive pretty much played every type available (the best being the Pensas made in NYC)- should be able to offer some sort of opinion....

    Off topic- have you ever seen Linard play at the Groove NYC? Hes one of the most entertaining performers I ever seen- lots of tongue'n'cheek slap bass solos!
     
  19. Richard Lindsey

    Richard Lindsey

    Mar 25, 2000
    Metro NYC
    Heard from Jon yesterday, and he says he'll be in the new shop full time as of Sunday. He's been busting his butt trying to get it all ready, doing virtually all the work himself. I can understand why you'd rather pick the bass up than have it shipped--I'd do the same if I were closer. Also, this way you get to hang out a bit and play some basses.;)

    No, never heard of Linard. But thanks for the tip, I'll have to keep an eye out.