Psst... Ready to join TalkBass and start posting, make new friends, sell your gear, and more?  Register your free account in 30 seconds.

motown and music theory instruction books

Discussion in 'General Instruction [BG]' started by Mael, Apr 10, 2003.


  1. Mael

    Mael

    Mar 25, 2003
    Ann Arbor, MI
    Hey,
    Anyone able to recommend and good books on playing motown or any on music theory?

    Thanks
     
  2. For Motown bass, there's nothing better than (that I'm aware of) the book "Standing in the Shadows of Motown." It has a bit of Motown/James Jamerson history, and transcriptions of many of his famous lines. It includes recordings of many other famous bassists playing these lines.
     
  3. The "Standing in the Shadows of Motown" book is the bass bible. Get it now.
     
  4. BoiNtC

    BoiNtC

    Nov 25, 2002
    NYC, USA
    My Standing in the Shadows book arrived today! I'm so impressed.. but I can't really read standard notation.. guess this book would be a good place to practice :p
     
  5. jazzbo

    jazzbo

    Aug 25, 2000
    San Francisco, CA
  6. cassanova

    cassanova

    Sep 4, 2000
    Florida
    Check out Mel Bays, "Note Reading Studies for Bass" It has everything for the beginner and progresses to professional level reading.

    This book combined with Standing in the Shadows of Motown, should help you get your reading skills up to speed and able to tackle all the examples in that book.
     
  7. Uncle Fat

    Uncle Fat Guest

    Mar 14, 2003
    Portland, OR
    "What Duck Done" is a prett great study in groove theory.
     
  8. jazzbo

    jazzbo

    Aug 25, 2000
    San Francisco, CA
    Tell me more about that book.
     
  9. td1368

    td1368

    Jan 9, 2001
    Philadelphia
    I recently got Motown Bass from Hal Leonard publishing. About 80-85% of the book are songs Jamerson played on. I think it breaks down the songs pretty well and gives a history of what was happening with Motown at the time. This book is$20 and I saw Standing in the Shadows of Motown for $35. Either way Jamerson's basslines are brilliant and worth studying.


    I'm working on "For once in My Life" by Stevie Wonder. Great Stuff.
     
  10. ConU

    ConU

    Mar 5, 2003
    La Belle Province
    The books are fine reference tools,but this music is NOT on the page boys....use your ears!!!!:cool:
     
  11. jazzbo

    jazzbo

    Aug 25, 2000
    San Francisco, CA
    While simplistic statements like this generally have an element of truth, without a detailed explanation of your point, I think it goes to waste and can be counterproductive.
     
  12. td1368

    td1368

    Jan 9, 2001
    Philadelphia
    Right on Jazzbo.
     
  13. ConU

    ConU

    Mar 5, 2003
    La Belle Province
    Motown,like jazz,is steeped richly in the aural tradition.Individual parts and whole songs were taught/learned by ear.Formal study of the genre must be augmented,no,surpassed by simply first learning the music by ear.Any serious discussion of this must acknowledge that first.
    Given the nature of the original post,to simply suggest Standing in the shadows of Motown as a means to learn the style,I think is misleading.For a newcomer those charts are daunting.I'd much rather see that student,bass in hand with his finger on the pause/rewind button developing his ear at the same time,rather than struggling with the syncopated funk reading those charts posess.Having said that,after the student has immersed himself in the aural aspect of the music,then introduce the chart for analysis and reading.
    The ability to learn these songs by ear is by far and away the most important life/professional skill a young bassist can acquire.
    There is a whole generation of young bassist's out there incapable of tuning their instruments without an electric tuner,that worries me.