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moving to fretless

Discussion in 'Basses [BG]' started by AbB01, Jun 14, 2012.


  1. AbB01

    AbB01

    Jun 14, 2012
    kolkata, india
    I'm new to bass, been learning for three years. I totally dig the tone of a fretless and decided to get myself one. I'm just scared whether i should do it this fast. :confused: as it is a lot different i guess. now as my first fretless what should i go for? a SVM jazz fretless so that i can get well versed on a fretless before going to a 6. or should i directly go for a warwick rockbass corvette fretless 6.
     
  2. Wallace320

    Wallace320 Commercial User

    Mar 19, 2012
    Milan, Italy
    There's an ocean in between!

    Anyway, instead of the Squier Vintage Modified fretless Jazz, I'd say Wilkinson Vintage Icon fretless Jazz.

    The look is much more relic'd than the Squier's, but the body, the tone and the hardware are way better, keeping a bargain price my friend...

    Then, if you're good enough for a fretless 6er... Much better!!!

    Cheers,
    Wallace
     
  3. AbB01

    AbB01

    Jun 14, 2012
    kolkata, india
    the problem? I'm from India :mad:.. only fender and warwick fretless basses are available. so you say i go for a four string first? the only four stringers available are the fenders and warwicks.. which one should i go for?
     
  4. Wallace320

    Wallace320 Commercial User

    Mar 19, 2012
    Milan, Italy
    Go for a Fender MIM standard fretless Jazz, new or second hand depending on bucks availabilities of course, or Warwick's Rockbass for sure. Even 6er, if you're already comfortable with. Just beware of Squier Vintage Modified fretless Jazz. It's a matter of poor body wood and stock pickups, that's why the price is so low.

    Just like that.
    Hope to be of any help: it's strange being italian and helping out an indian fellow TB, in this very moment. But no problem at all my friend.

    Cheers,
    Wallace
     
  5. Matthijs

    Matthijs

    Jul 3, 2006
    Amsterdam
    If you're experienced and really comfortable in playing 6 strings making the transition to a fretless 6 string would be logical. Otherwise I'd start with something that's not to far removed from what you are playing now. IMHO that would not nescecarily mean you have to start out with a cheap frettless and move on as you get better. A good instrument can help in learning stuff the right way. The Fender vs Warwick thing is a matter of taste IMHO.
     
  6. Wallace320

    Wallace320 Commercial User

    Mar 19, 2012
    Milan, Italy
    So it's gonna be
    "+1"
    to me

    Cheers,
    Wallace
     
  7. AbB01

    AbB01

    Jun 14, 2012
    kolkata, india
    thanks a lot guys but a lot of threads on talkbass suggest the MIM fretless is as good as the SVM fretless. i currently have a SVM fretted jazz and it is quite good. secondly i have never owned a 6 string bass. but have played on them and feel comfortable so do you suggest i go directly to a 6. it's $1006 over here.. whereas the SVM is $325.
     
  8. Mystic Michael

    Mystic Michael Hip No Ties

    Apr 1, 2004
    New York, NY
    You seem to want someone else to make your decision for you. But that's not practical, because nobody knows you or your situation better than you yourself.

    You've been presented with some reasonable factors to consider. Now it's up to you to apply those factors to your own situation, then come to the right conclusion for yourself. :eyebrow:

    MM
     
  9. TIP: (Beginners) If you get a fretless - get one with lines and play on the lines rather than behind them like you would on a fretted bass (precision is key). ;)
     
  10. EtoG

    EtoG

    Sep 7, 2010
    I would also advise that you keep a fretted bass as well. You may find that you enjoy playing fretless more, but sometimes you want the feel of a fretted bass and it just can't be replicated IMO.
     
  11. AbB01

    AbB01

    Jun 14, 2012
    kolkata, india
    trust me I do not want someone else to make this decision for me. But out here where I live, shops do not have fretless stocks, so i have to buy the bass and import it. I can't get a demo :(. Anyways I'll somehow manage.
    another thing I wanted to know about is whether to get one with fretmarkers or without one.
    on a bass without fretmarkers are there 22 dots? coinciding with each fret?, or are the dots like on a normal fretted bass 3-5-7-9-12... ?
     
  12. Wallace320

    Wallace320 Commercial User

    Mar 19, 2012
    Milan, Italy
    This one I really didn't know...

    I'm no accomplished fretless player, but when I do, I simply tend to get the very centre of each fret, not lines to play a note

    You never stop learning! Thanx Joe

    Cheers,
    Wallace
     
  13. Go out and try as many as you can. Different necks, lined, unlined, different pickups...
    I tried fretless a few times, with moderate success. I played one live for one song. It wasn't too bad. Until I tried a fretless Jazz and It just felt fantastic.
    Try until one speaks to You. It's out there, believe me!
     
  14. Play *right* behind the lines, you mean. If you play dead on the lines you will be sharp.
    Above all, trust your ears.
    Unlined is not as difficult as it seems... the side markers are helpful enough.
     
  15. If you play a Jazz and you like it... a fretless Jazz could be good, and you will already be used to the neck dimensions, positions, etc... but it IS a totally different animal.
    The side dots on a fretless are not on the usual spot between frets, but right where the fret would have been, at positions 3, 5, 7...
     
  16. Slowgypsy

    Slowgypsy 4 Fretless Strings Supporting Member

    Dec 12, 2006
    NY & MA
    I'm primarily a fretless player. Have been for years. My first instrument was a plain board... no lines. To play fretless properly, you play with your ears. I occasionally glance at my fretting hand, but for the most part I "know" exactly where I am on the fretboard because I hear it. So for me, I've found having a lined fretboard to be of limited value.

    The side dots are the same as the dots would be on a fretted instrument... 3rd, 5th, 7th, etc... except on the fret, not in the middle of frets.

    Regarding getting a 4-string or 6-string. They are very different instruments. What instrument do you want/prefer to play? One format is not "better" than the other. It's sort of like asking... what color should I get.
     
  17. MD

    MD

    Nov 7, 2000
    Marin Co. CA.
    My .02 would be to go the entry level/inexpensive route. Not everyone takes to fretless, and often, the bass ends up in the closet. Having a low loss or resale option can't hurt.

    Most entry level fretless basses will have lines. Side dots on almost all of them will be between the lines, putting them in the wrong place. Play on the dot and you'll be flat.
     
  18. Clef_de_fa

    Clef_de_fa Guest

    Dec 25, 2011
    I never get that ... I have a 4,5 and 6 strings basses and ... they are all basses, all tuned in fourth, the only difference is the neck is wider. it is like playing a 76 touch piano versus a 88 touch piano ... both are piano, both play the same just a wider range of note.

    As for fretless ... line may help but I'm sure like many of us you will wish those line disapear after you get use to it. It isn't as hard as it seems to play. dot are where the line are supposed to be at normal place ( 3, 5, 7 etc ) ... of course with Warwick you can go custom and have a dot at every "fret" etc. If you think you will like 6 strings basses ( you feel it ) then go with it, no need to "master" the four before going with 6 strings.
     
  19. Side dots, if present, on LINED boards are between frets, of course. You have a LINE where the fret would be, and that would be your reference.
    UNLINED, however, have them where the fret would be.

    But use your ears, don't forget that.
     
  20. Slowgypsy

    Slowgypsy 4 Fretless Strings Supporting Member

    Dec 12, 2006
    NY & MA
    I'll stand by my statement. On a 4-stringed instrument, I'm working the fretboard way more than a 6-stringed instrument. And for some reason, on a 4-stringed instrument, the timbre of the note becomes more of an issue for me... whereas on a 6-stringed instrument I'll have a tendency to just stay where I am and work the scale across the board.

    On keyboard there's only one way to play middle C. On a bass there's several... and they all have a different timbre.
     

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