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MPM Compensated tailpiece.

Discussion in 'Basses [DB]' started by Heifetzbass, Aug 19, 2004.


  1. Heifetzbass

    Heifetzbass Commercial User

    Feb 6, 2004
    Upstate, SC
    Owner, Gencarelli Bass Works and Fine String Instruments, LLC.
    Hey guys-

    This is going out to all of you that have the MPM compensated tailpiece. (non-adjustable) I was going to ask Dr. Pecanic about this but it says on the website that he has "gone fishin" for the month of August.

    Could one of you possibly take some measurements for me? I need to know how long it is on each side.

    Bottom to e string side, bottom to g string side.

    I have a very long string length on the "heifetz bass" and am worried that I would have to have extra long strings to use one of these lovely tailpieces. (some of the strings barely make it to the pegbox before the wrapping starts...) Plus, I have a c-extension, just to complicate matters.

    If someone would take the time for this I would greatly appreciate it.

    Thanks,
    Brian
     
  2. christ andronis

    christ andronis

    Nov 14, 2001
    Chicago
    I don't know if I'm understanding your question correctly but I think each tailpiece is custom made so my measurements wouldn't necessarily work on your bass. Measure your current tailpiece and e-mail it to Mike. He'll get back to you before too long.

    BTW, I really like my tailpiece. There's a pic of it in a previous Mike Pecanic post.
     
  3. Brent Norton

    Brent Norton

    Sep 26, 2003
    Detroit, MI
    HEFEWEIZEN: The measurements on the MPM TP I have installed on one of the basses in the shop is ~ 12" on the E side, ~ 13 3/4" on the G. Most of Mike's tailpieces are the Type II, which have a compensation of about 1 1/2" from the G to the E. The measurements from the bottom of the TP to the actual string saddles is more like 11" on the E, 12 1/2" on the G.

    LOONEY TOONS is right on -- though he usually does have a number of finished TPs on-hand, Mike can whip up a piece for you with whatever dimensions you require. He may be gone fishin' for a while, but his creations are worth the wait.
     
  4. godoze

    godoze

    Oct 21, 2002
     
  5. Heifetzbass

    Heifetzbass Commercial User

    Feb 6, 2004
    Upstate, SC
    Owner, Gencarelli Bass Works and Fine String Instruments, LLC.
    Thanks guys.

    Brent- that is what I am looking for. I will contact him next month. No big hurry, plus I have to decide which piece of wood to put on her.... drool...

    BG
     
  6. arnoldschnitzer

    arnoldschnitzer AES Fine Instruments

    Feb 16, 2002
    Brewster, NY, USA
    I would love to exchange opinions on whether and how these things work. I've used several, and have some theories of my own. Anyone interested?
     
  7. Brent Norton

    Brent Norton

    Sep 26, 2003
    Detroit, MI
    I'd love to share my opinions on whether and how these work, Arnold! Oh, wait -- I can't.....

    I've never A/B'd them with a straight TP on the same bass. I've done 3 or 4 basses with MPMs on 'em, but being new basses in the white, the Pecanics went right on during setups. I'll A/B the next one with the straight piece on my personal bass, which happens to be the resident R&D test sled. :smug:

    I'm certainly interested in hearing your thoughts on them, Arnold.
     
  8. arnoldschnitzer

    arnoldschnitzer AES Fine Instruments

    Feb 16, 2002
    Brewster, NY, USA
    I think that a regular tailpiece creates pitches in the afterlength which are relatively consonant in regards to each other. These consonances vibrate and accentuate certain played notes, especially wolf tones. The angled tailpiece breaks up these relationships, and frees up the vibrating side of the string as a result. Of course this idea of the uneven afterlength tailpiece is nothing new, as guitar and mandolin makers have been using them for many decades.
     
  9. mpm

    mpm

    May 10, 2001
    Los Angeles
    I agree with Arnold. Now tell them about the "reverb" factor, it's another interesting theory! BTW, "I'm baaaack..."
     
  10. Brent Norton

    Brent Norton

    Sep 26, 2003
    Detroit, MI
    Makes sense, Arnold. So to take it a step further, I ask you, Mike P., et. al. -- Given that several of the popular double bass pickups out there use string-mounted jacks, do you feel that using one of these pickups negate the benefits provided by a compensated tailpiece? I would think that in theory it would, at least on the A & D (or whichever two strings the jack is mounted on)?
     
  11. arnoldschnitzer

    arnoldschnitzer AES Fine Instruments

    Feb 16, 2002
    Brewster, NY, USA
    Good question, Brent. I'll take this one if you don't mind, Dr. Mike...I recommend to my clients that when they use a pickup, they wind a piece of foam through the strings' afterlength to deaden there, so the pickup doesn't amplify the sympathetic vibrations on the wrong side of the bridge. (Doing so can cause all kinds of unevenness and even feedback.) After all, the pickup doesn't know to only amplify the desired notes. So the jack tends to do some of that for you and I think that's not a bad thing. However, when playing unamplified, it makes sense to unhook the thing from the strings so the bass can be free to vibrate as much as possible. Perhaps someone could come up with a good alternate jack system that hooks on the tailpiece and retrofits to the various pickups...?
     
  12. godoze

    godoze

    Oct 21, 2002
    In other words, the afterlength ring like sympathetic strings ?
     
  13. arnoldschnitzer

    arnoldschnitzer AES Fine Instruments

    Feb 16, 2002
    Brewster, NY, USA
    Indeed. When playing you don't really hear the sympathetic afterlength notes but they contribute to the overall tone. The contribution is not always a happy one. Hey, as Dave Barry might point out, "Sympathetic Afterlength" would be a great name for a Rock band...