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musicman neck/truss

Discussion in 'Basses [BG]' started by shwashwa, Aug 2, 2005.


  1. shwashwa

    shwashwa

    Aug 30, 2003
    NJ
    do they have dual action truss rods an/or stiffening rods? i can't find any info on the site regarding the truss rods other than the design is "innovative". one thing i'm looking for in my next purchase is a stable neck. that's why i'm kind of holding off on the g&l tributes... no one can tell me if is a dual action rod or not, and the fender geddy lee has 2 rods. that config is a nightmare to get right in my rick, so i'm still searching for the stiff neck with dual action rod like my carvins warmoth have. (perhaps another warmoth?)
     
  2. From the FAQs on Ernie Ball's website (if it helps answer your question):

    Q: How do I set up my Music Man bass?
    A: First check relief in the neck by holding the lowest string down on the 2nd fret with your fretting (left) hand. Then, hold the same string down on the 12th fret with your plucking thumb and tap on the string in the middle to see how straight the neck is. There should be no more than the thickness of a business card between the string and the frets. If there is no relief in the neck, a little pressure in the middle of the neck (after adjusting the trussrod wheel) should help.

    The standard string gauge is .45-.100 with a .130 on the low "B" for the 5 string at 440 tuning. If you decide to tune down, typically you would increase the gauge for every 1/2 step downward that you tune. This will keep most of the measurements close by having more tension on the neck.

    Factory String heights are: Bass side 3/32 to 7/64 Treble side: 5/64" to 7/64" from the top of the 12th fret to the bottom of the string. The rest of the strings should have the radius of the fretboard when looking at the top of the string, (with the A string hidden from view by the E string, etc.), rotating the bass at the same time. The "right" string height is, of course, ultimately determined by your playing style.

    The pickup should be 4/32" to 5/32" on the bass side and slightly closer (4/32" to 5/32" on the treble side. This is determined by tuning and volume of strings measured by the top of the pole piece to the bottom of the strings. If the G string needs more volume, adjust it slightly more toward the pickup. Again, if you tune down, more distance is needed here, as well; but in any case, no lower than 4/32".

    If fret buzz occurs from the open to the fifth fret, the neck needs more relief. If it buzzes between the 5th fret and the 12th fret, the neck needs to be straighter (turn the wheel slightly clockwise). If it occurs all over the neck, the string height need to increase (by turning the trussrod wheel slightly counter-clockwise).

    For intonation: Check the harmonics to the fretted note on the 12th note on the twelfth fret if you don't play much above that fret. If you do, also check the harmonics at the 19th fret after the 12th fret is set. If the fretted note is sharp, you need to make the string longer by turning the saddle screw counterclockwise, and vice versa. Make sure that the string are coming off of the saddle straight and not in an arch. All measurements must be rechecked after each adjustment.
     
  3. Regardless of the setup, Music Man necks are very stiff and very stable. You won't be dissapointed. I think the neck is the best part of my SR5. And the gunstock oil + beeswax finish is to die for.
     
  4. fourstringdrums

    fourstringdrums Decidedly Indecisive Supporting Member

    Oct 20, 2002
    San Antonio
    I love MM's truss rod. It's a single rod (I don't know the difference between dual action and otherwise), but it has a wheel it at bottom of the neck that has holes in it. You just take an allen wrench, screw driver etc.. anything that can slide into the hole, and turn. It's quick and simple and no chance of rounding out a nut.
     
  5. shwashwa

    shwashwa

    Aug 30, 2003
    NJ
    i guess the fact that you need to put pressure on the middle of the neck tells me it's not dual action?
     
  6. fourstringdrums

    fourstringdrums Decidedly Indecisive Supporting Member

    Oct 20, 2002
    San Antonio
    I never had to put pressure in the middle of the neck to adjust the neck of the Sterling I had...in fact I've never had to do that with any bass.
     
  7. what exactly do you mean by "dual action". I don't think "pressure on the middle of the neck" really defines it one way or the other - that's just to help the truss rod to move after it's been adjusted.
     
  8. shwashwa

    shwashwa

    Aug 30, 2003
    NJ
    dual action is a specific term used to describe a type of truss rod that can adjust the neck forward or backward, in other words, it can correct a back bow without just losening the rod and hoping the strings pull it back or losening the rod and putting pressure on the neck to put forward bow back to the neck as the faq above suggests. the old fender style was only one way, and if you had a back bow many times you were screwed. i think that's the issue with many vintage fender necks. anyway, since i've had a back bow once and my luthier really freaked, i want to make sure i have a dual action truss rod now that they exist. new fenders have them and they make a point of advertising it. warmoths, carvins, benevete, pedulla now uses them, and most high end makers use the dual action now. previously the only way to correct the back bow was to losen the rod and try to bend the neck or tighten the strings and hope they pull it back. anyway, my point is, usually when a bass has a dual action truss rod they make a point of advertising it, and music man doesnt mention anything other than that their design is "innovative". maybe nino knows...
     
  9. shwashwa

    shwashwa

    Aug 30, 2003
    NJ
  10. FireAarro

    FireAarro

    Aug 8, 2004
    austr-
    +1
     
  11. I sent an e-mail to Music Man to see how they'd respond, and here was the reply I received.

    "Thanks for contacting Music Man. We don't experience too many back bow problems with our necks. The wood we use for our necks is well tempered before beginning any manufacturing processes. Our truss rods aren't dual action."