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MusicMan Sillhouete, Chapman Stick ?

Discussion in 'Basses [BG]' started by David-Adler, Sep 18, 2001.


  1. David-Adler

    David-Adler

    Feb 28, 2001
    Bonn, Germany
    Hey,

    after I got my beautifull Music Man Stingray 5, I´m now pretty sure that I won´t add another bass to my arsenal for some time (maybe a Six-String in some time).

    But I was looking at some "different" Instruments.

    On the one hand, there´s the Chapman Stick. Being Influenced by John Myung I love tapping stuff, and I would probably like to go stick. But I don´t think there is any stick around that I could test...

    On the other, there´s the MusicMan Sillhoute Bass Guitar. What kind of guitar is that? I always thought it was a baritone. Does anyone know about that thing ?

    Some Opinions on the Stick would be great, too !

    David
     
  2. Oysterman

    Oysterman

    Mar 30, 2000
    Sweden
    You got that right. A baritone guitar, it is. A bass, it isn't.
     
  3. embellisher

    embellisher Holy Ghost filled Bass Player Staff Member Supporting Member

    Well, it is technically a bass guitar, or tic tac bass, as invented by Danelectro in 1956 and like the Fender Bass VI from the late 60's.

    A Baritone guitar is tuned a 4th lower than a regular, guitar, a 6 string bass guitar is tuned an octave lower than a guitar, and has a lot skinnier strings than a 6 string contrabass.
     
  4. Oysterman

    Oysterman

    Mar 30, 2000
    Sweden
    Hm, I guess you're right, 29+ inches scale length seems a bit much for a baritone guitar... I stand corrected. It sure as heck doesn't look like a bass though.
    How is it tuned, an octave lower you say? Like a regular bass? Can those skinny strings handle that?
     
  5. embellisher

    embellisher Holy Ghost filled Bass Player Staff Member Supporting Member

    O-man, I'm not sure how they do, but they handle it surprisingly well, at least on the 6 stringers that I have played. But they are much more twangy sounding than a bass.

    The first 4 strings are indeed in the same octave as a 4 string bass.

    Used to be really popular in Nashville music, they would record URB, and then double it with tic tac to make it jump out more.
     
  6. Angus

    Angus Supporting Member

    Apr 16, 2000
    Palo Alto, CA
    Exactly how practical would the stick be for you? How in depth are you with chords and progressions? Can you play the piano? Etc etc...
     
  7. Bass Guitar

    Bass Guitar Supporting Member

    Aug 13, 2001
    I agree with Angus.

    The Stick is a specialized instrument which is only useful for certain situations, as opposed to the bass which is a neccessity in most bands. There is the Bass Stick (ala Tony Levin) but even so, you are better off being good on the bass, and finding gigs, than being good on the Stick.
     
  8. ...of course, you can play regular basslines on a Stick (a la Trey Gunn on the latest King Crimson album) and groove just as hard as any yokel with a 4-string.

    Never let yourself be in a band where the other members listen more with their eyes than their ears.
     
  9. foolfighter24

    foolfighter24 Guest

    Apr 22, 2000
    Arizona
    Sitar! Its all in the sitar. Bands are begging for a good sitar player! hmmm maybe not. But the guitarist at my church plays a stick, and it is the single coolest instrument.....possibly since a fateful year known as 1951.....
     
  10. I would think that a Stick player would make an excellent substitute for a keyboardist.

    Actually, that'd be an awesome postmodern jazz combo--Stick/Warr, EUB, and electronic drums. The Stick has such a clean sound that ridiculously complex chords could come out with aplomb.
     
  11. LWatford

    LWatford

    Jul 28, 2001
    Helena, AL
    There's a guy named Greg Howard that has a combo kinda like that. He takes the role of the keyboardist, and there is a bass player, drummer and saxman, I think.

    As far as other instruments, I think all songs need more cowbell! :D

    Lee
     
  12. CS

    CS

    Dec 11, 1999
    UK
    I have tried a Chapman Stick once. It is very touch sensitive and articulate. The problem I had was that I could play basslines or chord/leadlines seperately but not together.

    They are nice instruments but IMHO need a lot of time (which I dont have) to learn how to play it.