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Musicman Stingrays

Discussion in 'Basses [BG]' started by msangster, Feb 11, 2004.


  1. Are Stingrays versatile?
     
  2. Markdezy

    Markdezy

    Jan 24, 2004
    Atlanta
    That is like saying is Hydrogen flammable...
     
  3. xcental34x

    xcental34x

    Feb 28, 2003
    Memphrica, TN
    Heck yes.
     
  4. Toasted

    Toasted

    May 26, 2003
    Leeds, UK
    does the pope **** in the woods?
     
  5. bovinehost

    bovinehost

    Dec 5, 2002
    Endorsing Artist: Ernie Ball Music Man/Sterling By Music Man
    Does a one-legged duck swim in circles?
     
  6. The Stingray is a one trick pony. It is not very versatile. I'm surprised to see everyone saying that it is.

    None the less, it is a fantastic bass. I love the Stingray sound, but that's all you get. If you want a more versatile bass try out Ernie Ball's Sterling. It can pull off a somewhat Stingrayish tone and also give you a huge array of other tones.

    If you like the Stingray sound get it, but don't expect it to be versatile.
     
  7. Markdezy

    Markdezy

    Jan 24, 2004
    Atlanta
    Rofl. Never heard that one.
     
  8. bovinehost

    bovinehost

    Dec 5, 2002
    Endorsing Artist: Ernie Ball Music Man/Sterling By Music Man
    The Stingray is a one trick pony. It is not very versatile. I'm surprised to see everyone saying that it is.

    As a long-time (20+years) Musicman enthusiast, I'm always a bit confused when someone has the above opinion. It makes me wonder if that person is aware of how many different types of music have used the 'one trick pony' (OTP) Stingray.

    1. Does Sade sound like the Red Hot Chili Peppers?
    2. Do the Red Hot Chili Peppers sound like Queen?
    3. Does Queen sound like Shawn Colvin?
    4. Does anyone sound like Joni Mitchell?

    So I guess we have to admit that the poor old OTP Stingray is at least versatile enough to go from Flea to Larry Klein, which is quite a leap if you ask me. It's also been used in jazz, country and polka, for all I know. (I might be kidding about the polka, but I might not be.)

    Is the Fender Precision a OTP?

    I love the Stingray sound, but that's all you get.

    I guess it doesn't matter, then, what strings are on the bass, what sort of amps or cabs you use or what sort of right-hand technique is employed? That is a rhetorical question, please don't answer it, because we all know that of course it matters.

    And it does, in fact, make all the difference between two guys like Flea (aggressive attack, roundwounds, etc) and someone like, well, me (medium attack, flatwounds, plus I use old school amps/cabs to get thumpy tone). Also, Flea is apparently very good while I suck like a black hole, but that may be neither here nor there in this discussion.

    Anyway, it's just my opinion, but saying a Stingray is a OTP is like saying a Precision is a OTP. Too many different styles of music have been played on either bass for it to be entirely true. As always, I might be insane. Okay, discuss.
     
  9. mrbaloo

    mrbaloo

    May 9, 2002
    Sweden
    I would say that the versatility of a bass is a part of the users ability to play different styles of music.

    /MrBaloo
     
  10. CaptainWally

    CaptainWally Supporting Member

    Oct 21, 2000
    Sandy Eggo, CA
    Too true!

    ver·sa·tile ( P ) Pronunciation Key (vûrs-tl, -tl)
    adj. Capable of doing many things competently.


    Although I would agree the Stingray and P-bass are OTP's, the trick is versatile! And, of course, the other gear can make a huge difference, but I guess we're just talking about the bass here.
     
  11. bovinehost

    bovinehost

    Dec 5, 2002
    Endorsing Artist: Ernie Ball Music Man/Sterling By Music Man
    I would say that the versatility of a bass is a part of the users ability to play different styles of music.

    Hmmm, how does that apply to different people playing diverse styles of music?

    I mean, yes, sure, I get what you're saying, but I might also put it this way:

    The versatility of the bass is measured by its ability to be used effectively in different types of music.
     
  12. Devnor

    Devnor

    Nov 13, 2001
    Dallas TX
    Versatile as in it will sound like a 70s Jazz bass? No. Fodera? No? Mod Quantum? No. Do any of those basses sound like a Stingray? No.

    Its a damn fine bass. Like bovine said its used in styles from Metal to Funk to R&B to Country. Now that make it versatile? Hell yeah.

    What makes the difference is primarily the player.
     
  13. i've never had any problems getting many different, usable sounds from stingrays (and sterlings using only one switch position). by changing right hand technique and placement, and playing with the EQ of the bass and amp, i can a wealth of sounds.

    of course, whether someone else is happy with those sounds is entirely different. i feel more versatile and comfortable on a sterling than i do on my jazz, but i wouldn't ever call the jazz not versatile because of it. i'd be shocked if anyone did.

    robb.
     
  14. Everything you just said can be said of any bass. How is this specific to a Stingray? It is not. In the context you provide, every bass is versatile...change strings, change amps, play it different....of course you'll enhance versatility....to any guitar.

    COMPARED TO OTHER BASSES, the Stingray is NOT very versatile. Add all the non bass-brand-specific options you mention above to the Sterling for example (thereby making all else equal) and you get much more versatility in tone. But I love Stingrays, they're great.
     
  15. bovinehost

    bovinehost

    Dec 5, 2002
    Endorsing Artist: Ernie Ball Music Man/Sterling By Music Man
    COMPARED TO OTHER BASSES, the Stingray is NOT very versatile.

    I own and have owned a fair amount of different basses.

    The question I ask myself in any given situation is - does this tone work in this context?

    If I, an admitted caveman, can use the same Stingray with the same strings and the same amp/cabs for everything from Christmas gigs to blues to classic rock, is that not a versatile bass?

    Is the Sterling more versatile than the Stingray? Is a Jazz bass more versatile? An Alembic?

    This is where opinion takes over, because I say no and someone - you, perhaps - will say yes. Changes in tone do not, to me, translate to more versatility, they simply translate to more variables in tone.

    I do think my Jazz basses, for example, have more variance in tone due to the double pickups, but I do not really find them any more versatile in terms of sounding good in a particular genre.

    Are we agreeing or disagreeing? I need more coffee.
     
  16. We clearly have differing opinions on how increased tonal options may or may not add to the versatility of a bass. Fair enough.
     


  17. Very well said, Jack! :)

    Ditto to what rcz said.

    I, for one never bought into the OTP idea.

    Just my opinion. No fighting guys, come on; tomorrow is Valentines day.

    Only kisses and chocolate. :eek: (from our better halves)

    Mike :)
     
  18. bovinehost

    bovinehost

    Dec 5, 2002
    Endorsing Artist: Ernie Ball Music Man/Sterling By Music Man
    No, no fighting - it's an interesting discussion. Far too often this sort of thing degenerates into an "I'm right, you're wrong" argument, but I like the exchange of ideas with someone who:

    1. Has clearly thought this out
    2. Can clearly express their thoughts and
    3. Disagrees with me (somewhat).

    Anyone that can make me think is okay with me - and besides, we agree we like Stingrays, so how wrong could either of us be?
     
  19. SoyBase

    SoyBase

    Jul 1, 2001
    Atlanta, Ga
    Versatile is in the eye of the beholder..

    To me, a Stingray is very versatile, to some, a Stingray will sound like one no matter what.

    It's like the story of which came first, the chicken or the egg?

    Or how are we to say that someone is colorblind? Maybe they see different colors than we do, or WE see the colors wrong. (yeah, i know..too much 4:20 in high school)


    I, personally like the "set it and forget it" that the Stingray has.

    But sometimes I like having a different tone, so my 75 RI Jazz comes out to play.
     
  20. Versatility can be how much chance the bass provides for you to find a 'proper' tone. In this way, the greater the tonal variety available, the greatest chance, the greatest versatility. Or.. If a bass has one tone that is a lot of times 'proper'.. You can have the same chance. Which is the better definition of versatility.. I'm not sure!? :eyebrow: