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MXR M-80 vs Tech 21 Sansamp

Discussion in 'Effects [BG]' started by Secondhandloser, Jul 14, 2005.


  1. Secondhandloser

    Secondhandloser

    Mar 28, 2005
    Ok, I know this has been done to death, but I need help deciding, and there are no stores that carry them near me. Basically, I play in three bands, and need a suitable DI that can switch between sounds, as well as provide a decent distotion. I'd like opinions on both pedals, but i would really like to know how distorted the Sansamp can go, as one of the bands is a metal/ heavy rock group, with the bass sounding quite guitar- like in how it is distorted. I assume the M80 would fit better here, but I also play in a church band, and need to be able to get a useable clean sound, which I assume the sansamp would be superior for. And finally, I play in a band that does everything from poppunk to heavy rock to reggae, and I would need to get quality sounds for each. Also, I would like to know how transparent the pedals are when bypassed. thanks all.
     
  2. David Wilson

    David Wilson Administrator Staff Member Administrator Supporting Member

    Oct 14, 2002
    Lower Westchester, NY
    The MXR is just as good as the Sansamp for a clean sound, you don't need to have the distortion channel engaged at any time.
    They're both transparent when bypassed.
    If you want distortion rather than overdrive, the MXR is more what you want.

    Did you find the megathread comparing the two in this forum?
     
  3. Secondhandloser

    Secondhandloser

    Mar 28, 2005
    can i get a link?
     
  4. ted13

    ted13

    Mar 12, 2004
    montreal quebec
    imo the m80 is the better way to go. it sounds smoother and it's easier to sound good all the time with different basses. It definativly does not have that super presence inherent to the sansamp. i much perfer the M80, very versitile, giving you easy access to a bunch of different good tones and tweaking is simple on the fly.
     
  5. Robman

    Robman

    Mar 19, 2004
    Sherman, Texas

    +1
     
  6. David Wilson

    David Wilson Administrator Staff Member Administrator Supporting Member

    Oct 14, 2002
    Lower Westchester, NY
  7. Secondhandloser

    Secondhandloser

    Mar 28, 2005
    I guess I should clear this up to... I'm worried that the Sansamp will give a "generic" tone, as everybody has one. Is there flexibilty to get a unique tone, because that is what I'm after, furthering my tone.
     
  8. David Wilson

    David Wilson Administrator Staff Member Administrator Supporting Member

    Oct 14, 2002
    Lower Westchester, NY
    you don't have to use the tube emulation feature of the sansamp at all, you can just use it as a clean di / eq pedal for regular bass/treble cut/boost.
    There's a lot more to your tone being unique than what pedal you own. Lots of people own Jazz basses, I wouldn't say everyone with a jazz bass has the same sound.
     
  9. syciprider

    syciprider Banned

    May 27, 2005
    Inland Empire
    Which Sansamp are we talking about?

    I tried the Classic one. I thought it had too many switches LOL!

    The GT2 was almost perfect. Just enough options to keep it interesting. But in the end all it had to offer were a bank of switches that gave instant EQ settings that I still have to tweak further for much more $$$.

    I ended up with an M80. It's a three band EQ with distortion built in. The distortion is nothing to write home about but you can switch it off. I like the boost and broad tone adjustment. I thought I didn't want a pre amp until I tried it. Now it lives in my post compressor but pre rest of the effects spot. It even helped me keep some of the bottom end that the auto wah takes away.
     
  10. Secondhandloser

    Secondhandloser

    Mar 28, 2005
    Can the M80 do a decent overdrive, or is it more fuzz as some people say? And is the sansamp cabable of heavier or fuzzed out sounds (ala muse) or does it do more overdrive?
     
  11. David Wilson

    David Wilson Administrator Staff Member Administrator Supporting Member

    Oct 14, 2002
    Lower Westchester, NY
    The M80 is a distortion, not a fuzz or overdrive.
    The Sansamp does overdrive, not distortion or fuzz.

    While od,dist and fuzz CAN sound similar to each other at certain settings, for example maxed overdrive vs minimum distortion, they have fundamental waveform differences.
     
  12. syciprider

    syciprider Banned

    May 27, 2005
    Inland Empire
    Yah, I couldn't get the slight edge that I want from the M80.

    It wants to growl when I only wanted it to purr.

    So I still use the Bass Driver (excellent pedal btw)
     
  13. what sansamp are you talking about? LOL I would assume he means the bddi, the 2 sansamps you mentioned are the "guitar" models, so to speak. Comparing those to the m80 i could see why you'd choose the M80 (not that I've tried them with bass mind you.)
     
  14. Secondhandloser

    Secondhandloser

    Mar 28, 2005
    My bad, I thought I had mentioned it... the new programmable sansamp is what I'd be looking at, as I need access to a couple different sounds at any given time.
     
  15. syciprider

    syciprider Banned

    May 27, 2005
    Inland Empire
    I dunno. Napalm Death's bass player uses the GT2 as per Bass Player mag.
     
  16. Oh yeah, they do make several different Sansamps for guitar. But there is ony 1 "Bass Driver" Sansamp designed for bass, as shown here (well 2 but they sound the same)
    http://www.tech21nyc.com/bassdriver.html


    Sansamps are like belly buttons, every one has one, but I think that says something about the product. At least they arent the "new" best digital all in wonder box. It does what it does well, as it has for a long time and thats why everyone uses them. Then again there is about 100,000 posts already on this forum saying this same thing so I will stop now.
     
  17. keb

    keb

    Mar 30, 2004
    You can use the GT2 (and other SansAmp units, rackmount or otherwise) for bass; there are knob "preset" settings (this for example) in the manuals (and patches, in the case of rack units) for bass. I often use the GT2 instead of the BDDI for bass; I can dial in a setting that has more of a creamy warm sound than I can with the BDDI. My fretless in particular just doesn't get along with the BDDI, but sounds great through the GT2.