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My $50 practice / recording rig!

Discussion in 'Recording Gear and Equipment [BG]' started by NickInMesa, May 2, 2010.


  1. So here is my Behringer mixer, a UB802. $50 at MF.

    Channel 1 is an XLR coming from my SansAmp BDDI, which closes my pedal chain. The idea is to use the exact same effects I use when practicing and gigging. I used to use a Pandora (which I am going to sell soon), but the effects were not the same as the ones I use when playing with othes.

    Channel 2 will be for a mike.

    Channel 3/4 is connected to my PC Phone jack. It is a bit hard to see, but the lows are all the way down, the mids slightly down and highs in the middle. This is when I play over recordings (I mostly play covers), of course to remove most of the original bass. Dropping the mids allow to avoid the "tin can" effect.

    The CD/Tape Output goes to the PC mike jack. Recording software? Recorder.exe :)

    Phone jack: Sony MDR-V6, simply the best cans I've ever and will ever own. I may buy a second pair, as Sony is obviously discontinuing these.

    4573629750_c4754fe23e_b.
     
  2. Oh and because it is a powered mixer, if I am to lazy to move the pedal board out of the car, I can still plug the bass directly into channel 1, put a bit of gain and voila...

    So no, you don't need USB or expensive recording gear to do the trick, seriously.

    And recording yourself playing is extremely important. It opened my eyes, as it helps me detect all of my mistakes.
     
  3. GianGian

    GianGian

    May 16, 2008
    I have that same mixer, older and bigger version, but other than that it is the same...works very well, specially for the price I paid.
    Only one thing: why doesn't the CD Tape Output go into the audio jack in the PC?
     
  4. You mean CD Tape input? I can do that but then I can't EQ and remove the lows.

    Another thing I do is pan the bass slightly to one side, the music to the other.

    Now one thing I need is a good drum machine.
     
  5. GianGian

    GianGian

    May 16, 2008
    No, I mean the Ouput...I was just suggesting puting the audio in the general sound input on the computer(usually the blue one), and not on the mic input(usually the pink one). Maybe you could get a better audio quality.
     
  6. Yeah... It works well enough this way :)

    I will try though.
     
  7. seamonkey

    seamonkey

    Aug 6, 2004
    Some of the new PC have great audio built in.
    Only issue is latency, but asio4all takes care of that.
    So a little mixer is in many cases just fine. Better than most would think.
     
  8. BritPicker

    BritPicker

    Apr 20, 2009
    I get a lot of latency (at least thats what I think it is - a delay of sound coming out - about 1 second later) when I've tried to set up Audacity for my new PC. I was hoping to do some multitracking with it, obviously impossible with such a delay effect. I had a look for the asio4all, downloaded and unzipped it.. I can see all the files but I'm not sure how to get that to work with Audacity.. do I have to 'tell' Audacity where the asio4all stuff is or what? I googled around for the answer but gave up in the end. I also have a Zoom H4n that apparently I can use as an audio interface but met a dead end with that too. :bawl: Can anyone help me out here? I'd love to get it all working! :help::help:
     
  9. i just bought that exact same mixer for practicing. great little device
     
  10. Yup, best $50 I've spent in a while.
     
  11. seamonkey

    seamonkey

    Aug 6, 2004
    You just install ASIO2all and it shows up as another choice for the audio output devices. It works great if you just need fast drivers.

    But - use the Zoom H4n, go to their web site and pick up their ASIO drivers. They are real ASIO drivers for this guy.
    http://www.zoom.co.jp/english/download/software/h4.php
     
  12. MicG

    MicG Supporting Member

    Jan 2, 2006
    Garden City, Michigan
  13. seamonkey

    seamonkey

    Aug 6, 2004
    That plus a mixer would be fine, but you're not giving your motherboard sound devices a good try. It turns out that many motherboard sound chips are just as good if not better than many in lower cost interfaces.

    A little mini mixer is always handy to have for many situations, live and computer use.

    Just a mixer, motherboard input, and asio4all is a great way to go.
     
  14. MNAirHead

    MNAirHead Supporting Member

    way to go Nick
     

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