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My Amp (and The Everly Brothers)

Discussion in 'Amps and Cabs [BG]' started by REDLAWMAN, Dec 16, 2011.


  1. I'm a beginner and I'm teaching myself some EB songs, because all the tabs I can find are wrong.

    No one ever seems to either view postings or reply on the 'Recordings' Forum!

    I've sorted 'Let it Be Me' with C; G (AS 5TH); A; E; F; C (High); high G then C.

    I've got the tab for 'Ebony Eyes', and what I want to know is how to play when it goes 'A7' or 'D7' after an A or a D, so i don't have to just pluck the same root for 2/3 bars.

    Thank you.
     
  2. will33

    will33

    May 22, 2006
    austin,tx
    Try the Technique, General Instruction or Tablature sections?

    That said, figuring it out yourself will help you develop a better ear, sense of relative pitch, ears for jamming and sitting in with bands, hearing changes coming, etc.
     
  3. will33

    will33

    May 22, 2006
    austin,tx
    Before your thread gets moved as it really has nothing to do with amps, if I have time to take a listen, I'll PM ya a couple changes or something. Good choice in learner material there, vocally as well. If you can sing backup and play at the same time, you'll be a bigger asset to bands.

    When I was learning to play there was no such thing as tablature, not for bass at least, it was kind of a new thing in guitar magazines. We didn't learn proper sight-reading per se but you had to learn some music theory and develop an ear. When tabs came out it went from that to kids butchering Metallica songs by the dozen.:D
     
  4. Thanks Will.
     
  5. And yes, I'm singing (God help us all!).
     
  6. I must apologise here: I didn't mean 'tabs': I meant chords.

    It's the chords I've found and that are, generally, wrong!
     
  7. will33

    will33

    May 22, 2006
    austin,tx
    Your voice is the one instrument God did give you...you should use it.:smug:
     
  8. will33

    will33

    May 22, 2006
    austin,tx
    The writer isn't hearing it right. Suppose you're in G but the bass is playing the 3rd of the chord as part of a melodic or walking line, or the guitar is using a chord voicing other than the traditional "root goes on the bottom" voicing...some folks won't pick that out correctly and write it down as a B or something.
     
  9. OK; I get that, Will. Would you have the time to point me in the right direction, learning wise, to 'Glam it up a bit' when it goes to a 7, please, so that on that song, I'm not simply maintaining a root for 3 or 4 bars?
     
  10. Once you find it though, it's instantly recognisable, though, surely?

    It's funny, but as another example, I've just listened to Ralph Mc Tell's 'Let me Take You by the hand' and it's a big learning experience.

    I understand the whole 1; IV; V thing, but then you get a song like that with 2 more diatonic chords in and despite a basic knowledge of the octaves; high and low 5ths and 3rds of the chords, you have to have a really good feel while you're singing to find the others.

    It seems that not all songs are 1; IV; V!
     
  11. will33

    will33

    May 22, 2006
    austin,tx
    Sorry, lost your post for a bit there. No instrument in hand here but assuming the song is in A, it'd be A7. All the 7ths sound to be off the previous chord so A--->A7 leads to D. Or E--->E7 leads back to A., etc.

    Can listen again when I get home to be sure. I'm usually pretty good at this stuff. Most songs I learn, as long as they're not real intricate, I just sit down with instrument at home to get the key or starting note, the rest I can write out by ear just riding around in the car or whatever, no instrument.

    Would have to listen to the speaking part again for background changes but it's pretty simple '50's stuff. You could tbrow a 7th in there most anywhere walking to the next chord, just don't get monotaneous with it using 7ths every time.

    Check back later.
     
  12. I'll give it a try: thanks Will & thank you everyone else for your patience.
     
  13. will33

    will33

    May 22, 2006
    austin,tx
    Can't chart it all out here and now but by don't get monotaneous I mean mix it up using 7ths and regular major scale walks up or down so it doesn't all sound the same. Obviously you have to jive with what the guitars are doing but the important thing is the flow of the vocal line, both what's happening right then and what's coming next. Pick the sweetest notes that makes that go nicely. What you don't play is just as important as what you do play.
     

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