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My DB project

Discussion in 'Setup & Repair [DB]' started by rgarcia26, Oct 31, 2010.


  1. rgarcia26

    rgarcia26

    Jun 9, 2008
    Miami Florida
    Hey guys I being wanting to build a DB for some time, I am not a luthier, this is my hobby, I never owned a DB so I dont even play DB but BG... more experience luthiers suggest that instead of build one from scratch, buy one that needs to be restore... so that's how this begins...
     
  2. rgarcia26

    rgarcia26

    Jun 9, 2008
    Miami Florida
    Meet my project... I got the craiglist bass, the guy who sold it, was a very nice guy... he thinks is a pre-WWII bass... looks old to me... but what I know... is top carve... spruce I assume... back carve... maple I think... on the neck joint ebony trim on one side, in the other side wood filler, got some cracks on the ribs, and there is a patch on one rib also... has a crack at the bottom front plate, looks like someone made some repairs on it... i dont see any repairs inside the bass...
    here are some pictures...PS the guy also gave me the sound post... and a nice ebony tailpiece



    You can see the cracks at the bottom front

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]




    The Back is open a little

    [​IMG]



    I dont know if you can see there is a crack on this rip

    [​IMG]



    a patch

    [​IMG]

    the machines are very smooth

    [​IMG]
     
  3. Register_To_Disable

  4. fdeck

    fdeck Supporting Member

    Mar 20, 2004
    Madison WI
    Disclosures:
    HPF Technology: Protecting the Pocket since 2007
    Nothing like a Project. I hope it goes well. I played a DIY restoration for 28 years. Do you have Chuck Traeger's book?
     
  5. rgarcia26

    rgarcia26

    Jun 9, 2008
    Miami Florida
    he neck looks fine, figured wood, maple right??? Also you can see the bad detail at the heel (neck join) they use something like wood filler... instead ebony


    [​IMG]

    The ebony trim

    [​IMG]

    the front

    [​IMG]



    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]






    the back



    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]


    Now the question is... did i do good? any comments???

    Where do i start... I want to make the bass playable... I am more concern about the playability of the bass than the looks... I think the distress look with a litle TLC is better than a new looking bass.. I guess I dont want to make unesesary repairs, that at the end decrement the quality of this instrument.... I LOVE IT....

    one more thing I guess I need a book that taugh me how to repair DB's... what u guys recomend?
    Edit/Delete Message
     
  6. rgarcia26

    rgarcia26

    Jun 9, 2008
    Miami Florida
    I dont have any DB book... I looking for some advise on what book to get... I did see one that got good reviews in amazon.... is Chuck T in your opinion the way to go?
     
  7. Big B.

    Big B.

    Dec 31, 2007
    Austin, TX
    I'm no master luthier but I have seen basses in way worse condition than that come back from the dead. Good luck.
     
  8. fdeck

    fdeck Supporting Member

    Mar 20, 2004
    Madison WI
    Disclosures:
    HPF Technology: Protecting the Pocket since 2007
    Agreed. Just by the looks of it, this bass seems like it's far from being a wreck. Now, I'm no luthier, and my own restoration project was a ply bass. What I notice is that at least one of the cracks is headed in the direction of the sound post. This would seem to call for particular thought and consultation with a luthier about a repair strategy.

    Something that's hard to judge from the pictures is the thickness and geometry of the neck. Are the neck angle and overstand sufficient? I noticed on a lot of German shop basses that I tried out, that they could use some help in this regard. This is a chance to put a shim between the fingerboard and the neck if desired, as the board is AWOL anyway.

    I think you done good.
     
  9. Matthew Tucker

    Matthew Tucker Commercial User

    Aug 21, 2002
    Sydney, Australia
    Disclosures:
    Owner: Bresque Basses, Sydney Basses and Cellos
    +1. Now begins the test of your patience and perseverance.
     
  10. powerbass

    powerbass

    Nov 2, 2006
    western MA
    I would find a local bass luthier you can take the bass to for an evaluation and if they are willing you could consult with them as you go - get advice, tips etc.
     
  11. rgarcia26

    rgarcia26

    Jun 9, 2008
    Miami Florida
    Perseverance I got tons of it, patience I need tons of it… but I want to take it ease, it’s a little intimidated dealing with a already build instrument, don’t want to mess it up… anything that I’ll try on it.. should be already tested and proven somehow….
     
  12. rgarcia26

    rgarcia26

    Jun 9, 2008
    Miami Florida
    I was thinking on doing that, get an estimated of the repair cost… I am tented to have a luthier repair it, but then I won’t have any fun
     
  13. arnoldschnitzer

    arnoldschnitzer AES Fine Instruments

    Feb 16, 2002
    Brewster, NY, USA
    In my opinion, anyone serious about string instrument repair needs to own the Hans Weisshar book on violin repair.
     
  14. rgarcia26

    rgarcia26

    Jun 9, 2008
    Miami Florida
    I will get more pictures showing the neck angle and some measurements, I don’t totally get what are u referring to… I will get you that info
     
  15. Cody Sisk

    Cody Sisk

    Jan 26, 2009
    Lilburn, GA
    Disclosures:
    Ronald Sachs Violins
    +1 Great book..
     
  16. rgarcia26

    rgarcia26

    Jun 9, 2008
    Miami Florida
    Violin Restoration: A Manual for Violin Makers [Hardcover]
    Hans Weisshaar
    Price: $325.00 & this item ships for FREE with Super Saver

    Well I guess I have to go with the next best suggestion... $325 for the manual is out of what I can pay for books... sorry I am serious but I just can't right now...
     
  17. arnoldschnitzer

    arnoldschnitzer AES Fine Instruments

    Feb 16, 2002
    Brewster, NY, USA
    $325 is a lot cheaper than the cost of messing up a nice bass. It's also a lot cheaper than a pro-level course at a violin-making school. I think you can find the book for less if you look around for a bit.
     
  18. bejoyous

    bejoyous

    Oct 23, 2005
    London, Ontario
  19. rgarcia26

    rgarcia26

    Jun 9, 2008
    Miami Florida
    this one: A Luthier's Scrap Book???
     
  20. rgarcia26

    rgarcia26

    Jun 9, 2008
    Miami Florida
    I will see if one a the local shops got one on hand...


    PS I just got home the to check the bass top plate with a mirror, as Wayne suggest, and I can see that there are reparied, I do see little wood squares and glue from the beginning to the end of the cracks....
     
  21. Gearhead43

    Gearhead43

    Nov 25, 2007
    NorCal
    Ah man, I would love a cool old carved bass like that to restore. I agree - you should take the bass for an evaluation - throw the luthier some cash for his advice on proceeding and explain to him that you are serious about doing it right.

    A cool luthier would be fine with helping you out, IMO - if he tosses you out for asking for info (even if you are willing to pay him for his advice) - then I'd find another luthier.

    These guys are master craftsman, IMO, and their time is worth money. If you go in there humble, and explain your ambition albiet lack of funds, I'd say you have a good chance of taking some good notes. Depends on the guy and your personality and shmoozing skills, of course.