Dismiss Notice

Psst... Ready to join TalkBass and start posting, make new friends, sell your gear, and more?  Register your free account in 30 seconds.

my first bass...

Discussion in 'Luthier's Corner' started by JSPguitars, Jun 17, 2004.


  1. JSPguitars

    JSPguitars

    Jan 12, 2004
    Grass Valley
    well here it is. I finally glued the neck in this last weekend, so it's starting to look like something now. There's still a LOT of sanding to be done but I couldn't f'ing wait to get that neck glued in there (I used Titebond II). It's my first neck built from scratch, and my first 'guitar' built entirely from scratch, so I'm considering it my "prototype" bass to see if I like the design and such.
    It's a fretless 34" scale, mahogany body, korina neck, rosewood f/board, flame maple headplate. I used flame maple veneer for the fretliners, except one didn't seat right and i couldnt get it out so that's why there's some filler puddy on the fretboard drying still.
    I really like the body design and think it'll come out nice once I get it all sanded and contoured right. I was gonna do a simple singlecut design, but then thought I'd cut out some of the top horn for the fun of it. Just the very end of the top horn is still connected to the neck, and I don't know if this was a good idea or not. We'll just have to wait and see. I really got into the contouring, but have now realized that it takes FOREVER to get the damn thing sanded. I've already spent days sanding this thing. I really like the way Lefay bass bodies look, and I've always had a fetish for Carl Thompson scrolls. A few builders have definitely influenced how and what I want to create.
    I'm just curious what YOU all think, since you have taught me so much already. I appreciate this forum and everyone here immensely. I also appreciate constructive criticism and negative feedback just as much as praise!
    It will have an black ABM bridge, bartolini MM pickup, and black tuners as well.
    PS........i really don't like that headstock design :eyebrow:
     
  2. JSPguitars

    JSPguitars

    Jan 12, 2004
    Grass Valley
    here's a pic of the back, so far...
     
  3. tjclem

    tjclem Supporting Member Commercial User

    Jun 6, 2004
    Central Florida
    Owner and builder Clementbass
  4. McHack

    McHack

    Jul 29, 2003
    Central Ohio!
    Holy smokes, that's one ornate design!!!! I like it, & can't wait to see it finished...
     
  5. Tim Barber

    Tim Barber Commercial User

    Apr 28, 2003
    Serenity Valley
    Owner: Barber Music
    Coming along nicely :) Looks like a cross between a Ritter Okon and a LeFay Herr Schwartz, not too shabby influences. Good job thinking outside the Fender "box"!
     
  6. Eyescream

    Eyescream

    Feb 4, 2004
    Knoxville, TN
    I like it. I want one.
     
  7. JSPguitars

    JSPguitars

    Jan 12, 2004
    Grass Valley
    Thx for the feedback. Tom, I've always wondered about those scrapers, i know they have some at our local hardware store, i'll definately pick some up and try them out cuz I have little elbow grease left to give right now. I've never used them before.
    I love the Ritter basses, definitely influenced my design, as did Lefay.
    As for the finish, I'm not really sure what to do. I don't have a spray booth or gun so I'm definitely gonna do an oil finish, but i don't know whether to stain the mahogany a color (deep red) first or not?? I usually aim towards a more natural finish, and might end up just staining with Watco nat. danish oil. Anyone have suggestions as to color/stain for mahogany?? Maybe try and do a cherry stain or faded cherry a la Gibson SG or something??
    I don't know if you want one of these yet, not sure how it plays or SOUNDS............yet.
     
  8. tjclem

    tjclem Supporting Member Commercial User

    Jun 6, 2004
    Central Florida
    Owner and builder Clementbass
    The trick with a scraper is the angle you hold it at. Check it out on some scrap. You need the curved one bacause of the shapes involved with your bass. I don't think you will regret getting a few.......t
     
  9. JSPguitars

    JSPguitars

    Jan 12, 2004
    Grass Valley
    Tom, got some scrapers and am using the curved one that kinda resembles a bass clef exclusively. I really like it. I might even sleep with it tonight. Now I just need to learn how to sharpen them or 'burnish' i guess they call it. Thank god mahogany is relatively easy to shape! I could see how a really hard or pourous wood might be hard to get even. Using these scrapers is much more meditative than profusely sanding away with sandpaper. And there's something about shavings instead of sawdust that's really appealing.
    Hopefully I'll have some updated pics after the weekend is over.
    :hyper:
     
  10. Skips

    Skips

    Feb 19, 2003
    Now you've got me interested in those scrapers.
    Do they work like a rasp or sureform, for rough shaping, or are they a bit more precise, for smoothing out the wood?
     
  11. JSPguitars

    JSPguitars

    Jan 12, 2004
    Grass Valley
    skip,
    they are definitely more precise. I use a sureform for initial shaping of the belly contour, etc. usually. THese scrapers are for smoothing and evening out after using the sureform, before you go to use the sandpaper, etc. They seem to work real well for establishing the initial shape of the body/neck before using paper to fine sand everything out. I'm sure if you are real good with a chisel and spoon chisels, etc. ...you might not need to go this route, but at this point I am not. After using these for just a day, i really like them, esp the curved one. You just need to find the right angle of the edge and then use that edge AT the right angle to whatever you are sanding. I got a set of 3 for like $13. Definitely worth the money. Great for smoothing out wood where hardwood meets more porous wood grain lines.