My first Jaco

Discussion in 'General Instruction [BG]' started by mijarra, Jan 24, 2001.

  1. mijarra


    Jan 20, 2001
    Well, I went to Borders tonight to pick up a Jaco CD as I have never heard him before this. I didn't know what the heck to get and the selection was kinda limited so I ended up with "Live in New York Volume 4". My initial reaction after hearing most of the tracks is that it's pretty good overall music but I am sensing it's not his best work.(?) He's pulled off a few impressive runs so far, but for the most part it's just pretty average jazzy bass stuff. Anybody have an opinion on this CD?
  2. Bruce Lindfield

    Bruce Lindfield Unprofessional TalkBass Contributor Gold Supporting Member

    Well I've got quite a few Jaco CDs but not this one! I think the general advice is to avoid these live CDs which were mostly just cashing in on Jaco's fame and tragic death.

    Now I'm not saying this is a bad album, just that there are about a dozen that you could have got that are better!

    Like :

    Jaco Pastorius (Solo Album)
    Word of Mouth
    Birthday Concert

    Several albums with Weather Report :

    Heavy Weather, Night Passage, 08.30,Black Market, Mr. Gone,

    Several with Joni Mitchell:

    Hejira, Don Juan's Reckless Daughter, Shadows and Light (live) and Mingus

    Bright Size Life - with Pat Metheny

    And probably more......!
  3. Good timing, seeing as this is a Jaco thread and i wasgoing to start one..

    My dad has a Michel Columbier record with all the great session musos playing on it. And yes Jaco Pastorius is on nearly all of the songs. lol. A question has arisen not just by me but by a few other people i know as well.

    On this album, he gets a sound that is a mellow and pure as a saxophone (if i can compare). Another bassist Jeff Berlin (go read the interview its good) gets a sound similar to that as well on a piece called Bach (got an Mp3). I was wondering how do they achieve such a sound?? It sounds so soft and yes on the Michel Columbier album it sounded like a saxophone believe it or not.

    Anyone know where i can find out how to achieve such a sound?? Don't get nme wrong, i am happy with my own sound, but its good to explore other ppls too.

  4. Bruce Lindfield

    Bruce Lindfield Unprofessional TalkBass Contributor Gold Supporting Member

    Well I haven't heard either of the pieces mentioned, but would suggest, given the players we're talking about that it's a case of phenomenal technique, honed by many years of practice, coupled with fretless bass.
  5. furtim


    Dec 12, 1999
    Boston, MA, USA has an absolutely terrific Jaco discography, completely with brief reviews. Also, it marks the bootlegs specifically. Those are the CDs to avoid, as those are not only poor performances, but do not benefit the Pastorius family at all. All of the Live in New York CDs are bootlegged. is also a great site for finding out a little more about the history of Jaco and what made him so great. If you're really interested in Jaco, I suggest you read Milkowski's "Jaco" biography, then read everything on the website to correct what Milkowski got wrong and just plain left out. The unfortunate thing is that the Pastorius family had nothing to do with Milkowski's book and don't get any money from that, either, so feel free to skip it if you like.

    As for my personal CD recommendations, I'd say Weather Report's 8:30, Jaco Pastorius, Birthday Concert, and Joni Mitchell's Shadows and Light. The best part about S+L is that it would be good even without Jaco, so having him in there makes it that much sweeter. ;) You may also want to pick up the Columbia (?) compilation CD This Is Jazz #40. It's a compilation including all of the best of Weather Report's Jaco Years. That's a good starting point before going out and buying Weather Report albums. It's more efficient. ;)
  6. JMX

    JMX Vorsprung durch Technik

    Sep 4, 2000
    Cologne, Germany
    Hm, Jeff once said in an interview he'd never play fretless because of Jaco, so I doubt he played one on that session...