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My first time.....recording

Discussion in 'Miscellaneous [DB]' started by bassy18, Apr 23, 2002.


  1. bassy18

    bassy18

    Oct 30, 2001
    Here
    Hey all,

    Its been a while since I've posted anything. I've just been kinda groovin away.

    I have been playing bass for about six years now, and the other day I heard a recording of myself for the first time. I've seen videos and such before, and the sound quality was band and I hated it. This time it was recorded on a dat, and I sounded pretty good. i was with my jazz ensemble of course but it still felt good to hear me, and know it was me playing, especially my solo. This was just an awesome experience for me and I am so excited. Just wanted to share. Why don't some of you guys share you "first times" with me, just for the heck of it.:cool:
     
  2. If I could remember that far back, I might oblige. I vaguely remember walking in to a recording studio at the ripe old age of 16 with my band and later hearing my tune played over a local station to promote a "Battle of the Bands" event which we participated in. I was elated to hear my song on the radio, but that feeling of elation diminished over the years as I became better at playing bass - my recording sounded more and more basic as I 'progressed' and, well, I was frankly embarassed at having had it played over the airwaves. Ah, the lessons of life. T'was an experience.
     
  3. lermgalieu

    lermgalieu Supporting Member

    Apr 27, 2000
    Palo Alto, CA
    I was in a band called "Custodial Phish" and we recorded a 3 song demo with a cover of "Walk Don't Run" and two hardcore originals. This when I was about 16, fifteen years ago. The engineer put some cheesy delay effect on the end of one song that we thought was the coolest thing ever. I think we did it all in about 3 hours, and the studio was this place upstairs at the local music shop. The demo definitely wasn't that great in quality, but since my favorite old school hardcore (like Bad Brains/Bad Brains) all has that 'crappy' feel to it anyway, we thought we were right in line with our heros.

    Anyway, I have recorded alot since then, in a lot of styles, and each time it sounds better. Oh, and mastering helps ALOT.

    --> L
     
  4. bassy18

    bassy18

    Oct 30, 2001
    Here
    I wish that I have the chance to go in a studio to record. This was just a recording of us during a concert, where we couldn't go back fix anything or do it again. I didn't even think about that. I can't wait till I do something in a studio cause then I will have the chance to fix mistakes. I guess this is all so fascinating because one, I am a college kid and everything is new and exciting, two, because i am seventeen and everything is new and exciting, and three it was my first time. I bet it will be better if we record ourselves in a studio.

    Keep the comments coming guys...keep em coming:)
     
  5. lermgalieu

    lermgalieu Supporting Member

    Apr 27, 2000
    Palo Alto, CA
    I actually detest the studio. Be careful what you wish for is all I can say - there is so much downtime in the studio, and also you will often find that things that work live may not work in the studio - I have learned through experience to make things a little simpler, to play what I know, because the situation is unnatural and tense, and it is hard to get a real fluid, relaxed sound. However, take that with a grain of salt, because I know lots of people who love the studio. I do have to admit I usually love the end product after my pain has worn off (usually at least a month after recording is over).
     
  6. Marcus Johnson

    Marcus Johnson

    Nov 28, 2001
    Maui
    I'm kind of the opposite; I like the studio, but rarely listen to the finished product. You know how most people send you a copy of the finished CD? I have a huge collection of those, and most of them are still in the shrinkwrap. I do like the fact that I can make money during the daytime, when I would otherwise be at home, doing yardwork;) .
     
  7. Sam Sherry

    Sam Sherry Inadvertent Microtonalist Supporting Member

    Sep 26, 2001
    Portland, ME
    Euphonic Audio "Player"
    I'm a proud grad of Hall High School in West Hartford, CT, class of '79. Hall had (and still has) a heck of a program -- I went to school with Larry Cohn, Scott Hiltzik and Steve Shapiro, and was about three years ahead of Pat Zimerli and Brad Mehldau.

    In '78 we recorded at RCA Studio C in NYC -- my first studio experience. I remember playing things that just floated out, unplanned, that sounded above my level, which was a moving experience. That record won the first annual DownBeat high-school record competition, which was cool, and second place went to a school in Los Angeles, which was even cooler.

    In '79 we went back to RCA. I brought my DB on the bus and FORGOT my EB. The director had smoke coming from his ears! Anyway, my recording debut on DB was never heard because the tape machine had pitch wobble. It was a session karmically never meant to see the light of day (and probably just as well).
     
  8. lermgalieu

    lermgalieu Supporting Member

    Apr 27, 2000
    Palo Alto, CA
    Yeah, Ed, that's the thing, I am not playing jazz, although a few of our tunes have a jazz feel. Its (at least for its album incarnation) prettly tightly arranged, somewhat complex stuff. Additionally, I am not getting paid to sit in a studio, this is my original band, sans recording contract, so when I am in the studio I am actually losing money that I could be working for.

    Tmost weary I get is during mixdown (the takes usually go fairly quickly as you say) - I am assuming from what you are saying you usually aren't as integrally involved with mixdown and overdubbing (percussion, etc) as I typically have been. If my role in a recording situation was just as "the bass player" rather than bass player, composer, and co-producer, yeah it might be a lot more relaxed. And if someone was paying me!
     
  9. lermgalieu

    lermgalieu Supporting Member

    Apr 27, 2000
    Palo Alto, CA
    Hehe, pay a percussionist. DIY, baby. Plus we laid down marimba tracks and all sorts of stuff - the songs kind of evolved in the studio, then we re-aranged instrumentation live to emulate it.

    My bass tracks usually go down live and stay the same, except last time when we didn't have anough tracks to mic the DB in addition to the DI well so I overdubbed those parts later. But seriously, the overdubbing wasn't even so bad, it's the mixdown. There is no way to avoid listening to the same song 80 times, especially with several perfectionists in the band.

    Again, this is laregly because of the nature of what we are doing. I dig playing live because we don't approach it that way, we go in with more of an organic approach, which is in truth how I would prefer to record, but I am out-voted.
     
  10. Sam Sherry

    Sam Sherry Inadvertent Microtonalist Supporting Member

    Sep 26, 2001
    Portland, ME
    Euphonic Audio "Player"
    It's always a balance between time and money, but you have to spend some of both to avoid a "demo quickie" result. My CD was made on a tight budget -- I called every favor in sight. To balance "tight" with "fresh" and acknowledging that people were playing for free, we rehearsed several times but for only one hour each time. Focus, work, get in, get out. Also, I worked with good mix engineers so that I could be "producer" instead of "mix assistant" -- I dealt with broad sonic goals and balance issues, and left the technical details to them.

    And Ed, thanks for your gracious comments. Echoing LermG, the CD was fun to do but even more to have done.
     
  11. bassy18

    bassy18

    Oct 30, 2001
    Here
    Heck,

    I was just excited because my and my band(well the schools jazz band actually) played a H e double hockey sticks of a concert and we had it recorded on a dat machine and then its gonna be put on a cd. With all the stuff you guys are talking about, I don't think I want to go in a studio. I don't think I would enjoy it. I don't like "electronic music". Heck when I get my bass guitar my setup is gonna be simple: me, a big @$$ amp, my bass guitar, and some ice for my sore fingers. I don't want any pedals or effects. Just what comes from my heart into my fingers to boom out of the amp. Now ask me again in a week my opinion may change. I am just an amateur. A student learning from you guys and my teachers. I haven't even taken private lessons yet, so that shows you where I am. Keep the comments coming. I enjoy reading what the "pros" have to say and I like learning from your experiences.

    Lil' ol' me:)
     
  12. Joe Taylor

    Joe Taylor

    Dec 20, 2001
    Tracy CA
    1964 High School Gym school orchestra. We did an LP I still have one and it is real BAD. the hiss and scratches shound better than the music. Then we did it again in 65 wasn't any better.

    Joe
     
  13. I know that if you're a professional you should be able to play no matter what the setup, but what I don't like about recording studios is lack of eye contact with the other players. It becomes too business-like. I don't have alot of recording experience, and my last recording is an exercise tape for Prevention Magazine.:( Good studio, though, and the engineer is a William Paterson grad who played keyboards for Blood, Sweat and Tears.
     
  14. Marcus Johnson

    Marcus Johnson

    Nov 28, 2001
    Maui
    Hey Bassy; you could probabably hire any decent studio to do a remote recording; that is, bring the studio to you. Play where you're comfortable. I did a jazz CD that way last year, in the pianist's living room, circled around his Baldwin concert grand. Big pot of spaghetti on the stove, bottle of wine, and go. Came out great.