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My new Rickenbacker 4003!

Discussion in 'Basses [BG]' started by FOE_Bass, Jan 23, 2001.


  1. FOE_Bass

    FOE_Bass Guest

    Jun 29, 2000
    Grass Valley, CA
    Hey dudes! I just bought a new Ric on sunday, and I have a question. I adjusted the truss rods to give it more bow, but now the action is really high. I can lower it on the bridge, but then the strings hit the bridge pickup. Is there a way of lowering my pickup. BTW, I love the Ric neck. If I were to make my own bass, I would use that neck. I love how the wood on the fret board is glazed.
     
  2. You are a brave man...I set up my own basses, but I won't TOUCH my Rick...I let a pro deal with those bloody dual truss rods :D
     
  3. The two screws holding the bridge p/u cover on also run through the bridge p/u, and by adjusting those (they're spring-loaded so they'll never get sloppy) you'll find the p/u will raise/lower without affecting the cover. Clockwise=raises, Anti-Clockwise=lowers - and there's quite a bit of travel so you should get plenty of clearance.

    Remove the cover, unless you require it for an anchor, etc. Strings (if the action is high or you dig in while playing) often hit the cover and buzz.

    The dual truss-rod isn't too bad; just make sure that you only do *small* turns (1/8 turn) and then leave it for 5 minutes to "settle" - then check the neck and adjust again as necessary.

    I battled with my 4003 for a long time trying to get that "perfect" flat fretboard - I find there's a median point between the action and the bow. Remember as you tighten the truss (removing bow) you'll have more chance of buzzing, especially near the nut, and especially if you're trying to get ultra-low action as well.
     
  4. nanook

    nanook

    Feb 9, 2000
    Alaska
    The current issue of Bass Player gives you the exact measurements to use and the directions, generic on course.

    Making adjustments without knowing the measurements will almost always lead to over adjusting and possible damage.

    You have probably already ruined the bass......... I'll give you $100 for it anyway.
     
  5. JamesTheFenderGuy

    JamesTheFenderGuy

    Jan 25, 2001
    <i>The current issue of Bass Player gives you the exact measurements to use and the directions, generic on course.

    Making adjustments without knowing the measurements will almost always lead to over adjusting and possible damage.

    You have probably already ruined the bass......... I'll give you $100 for it anyway.</i>

    I have never ever used any measurements in my life when adjusting the truss rod on any of my basses, so I think that reply is very misleading.

    My 4001 was left with badly adjusted rods for years (before I got it), so I took it to John Diggins (the man behind JayDee basses) who fitted new custom truss rods for me, and the neck is very easy to adjust to taste.

    I also have a Wal bass that requires an 1/8th tweak of the rod depending on environmental conditions etc.

    As long as you adjust the rods very carefully, no more than 1/8th turn at a time, and stop and check what difference it makes, you will probably not damage the instrument in the least.

    HOWEVER, if you are at all unsure about what you are doing, take the instrument to a good tech.
     
  6. Bruce Lindfield

    Bruce Lindfield Unprofessional TalkBass Contributor Gold Supporting Member

    I agree entirely with James and have always adjusted my basses by "feel" and gradual tweaks, rather than referring to any hard and fast "measurements". There has been a lot of discussion about this sort of thing in the "SetUp" forum and maybe this is where this thread should be, as it seems to be about "Set Up" rather than anything else.
     
  7. SantasCabanaBoy

    SantasCabanaBoy

    Jan 15, 2001
    NO offence but screwing with the truss rods on a new ric is not very smart at all. There is somthing about a Ric, it is built like a rock but it seens so fragile, you should really have a pro set it up, those dual truss rods are not the king of thing to mess with unless you really know what you are doing.


    But adjusting the bridge pickup isnt too hard, the scews on the sides of the pickup cover need to be turned, that should do it
     

  8. My 2 cents once again! :)

    - If you're scared to adjust the truss rods on a Ric, leave it to a tech.

    - If you've got a good eye, a good feel and some confidence there is no reason why you can't attempt a neck adjustment on a Ric.

    For a beginner, yes, Ric dual truss rods can seem scary, and fragile is probably a good description. The only time i've had troubles was where the truss plate (that the rods pass through) was not butting up to the neck @ 90 degrees, so as you tightened the rods, they'd start bending up. I had to rout some more wood out to make it sit flush - that was slightly worrying but worked out fine.

    I recommend you learn as much as possible about setting up your own axe and amp - even if you don't end up actually doing much/any of the work.