My scorpions not looking too good :'O(

Discussion in 'Off Topic [BG]' started by yoshi, Mar 8, 2003.

  1. yoshi


    Jul 12, 2002
    England, London
    My pet scorpion began to moult last night, and when I checked on him this morning his progress looked pretty concerning.

    He'd started to emerge out of the old shell, and I could clearly see his tail and a numbe rof legs had not properly formed. I'm almost certina it's due to the fact that he decided to moult over the heating source and bacame dehydrated.

    Now, he's reduced to a limp, dryed out animal that can barely move (cant walk at all). Ive attempted to feed and give him water but my efforts arent paying off. If he doesnt show improvement he'll die in maybe a week, which is wher ethe problem lies; do I let him go on his own, or end it sooner myself?

    Please dont laugh as im genuinly upset. Ive raised him form a tiny little baby.
  2. Ask a vet if he/she is going under pain. If he is ask for a way you can end it quickely.

  3. foot + bug =

  4. Tsal


    Jan 28, 2000
    Finland, EU
    How nice and insensitive post. You are at the top of my 'best posters' list! :spit:

    I'm not sure if scorpions have advanced-enough nervous system to feel 'pain', for example fish don't.

    But if it's legs aren't going to function, I think it's not worth to keep it alive.
  5. lesfleanut

    lesfleanut Guest

    Sep 25, 2001
    Syracuse N.Y.
    Some people may think its just a silly bug... But to you its a pet. I understand the love a man can have for his pets, I once had to put my dog to sleep. That was a horrible experience, but I felt it was nessicary. If you think that it is gonna die soon and its just in pain you should kill it. But do it fast. As insensitive as it sounds maybe LeX's idea is the best solution, as its probably the quickest possible way to kill the litte guys... Sorry about your scorp man.
  6. yoshi


    Jul 12, 2002
    England, London
    The thing is, on it's next moult it will regrow its missing parts, but I don't know if it will make it that far, or want to carry on in it's sate.

    If we do decide to help it on it's way, I've no idea how to go about it. There's no way I'd just 'stamp' the litllte fella :bawl:
  7. Vince S.

    Vince S. Resident Former Bassist

    Jan 24, 2003
    I can sense a "how to kill a scorpion" list about to come on..

    The most humane way of killing it would definitely not be squashing it. And the mess would be miserable to clean up considering youre so attached to it.

    If you have any chloroform or rubbing alcohol, perhaps a drop on a needle will work. Just stick the needle between one of its armor "platelets" and apply this maybe four or five times.

    Another painless way to let your pet go would be a high voltage shock..if you have a taser or stun gun, that would certainly do it. If not, I really dont recommend trying to rig something.

    Sorry about your pet.
  8. Dave Castelo

    Dave Castelo

    Apr 19, 2000
    flush it down the toilet
  9. yoshi


    Jul 12, 2002
    England, London
    The poor fella; didnt make it through the night :bawl:

    Bah humbug, It wa sonly a few days ago that I sat and watched it for ages digging out a new burrow and foraging for juicy insects:bawl:
  10. john turner

    john turner You don't want to do that. Trust me. Staff Member Administrator

    Mar 14, 2000
    atlanta ga
    get a kitty.

    they last a lot longer and are much more user friendly. :)

    sorry about the loss of your pet, btw, :(
  11. Sorry man, I've had many pets and watched them come and go. John has a point, treat yourself to a kitty. It WILL do a world of a difference.
  12. old_skool


    Aug 17, 2000
    Milwaukee, WI
    How do you feel about handicapped people that dont have the use of there legs?
  13. Tsal


    Jan 28, 2000
    Finland, EU
    If they would be able to build nice basses with their hands, they'd be ok.

    If not...

    foot + handicapped = SQUASH

    If you ask foolish questions, you are bound to get stupid answers. Ok?
  14. secretdonkey


    Oct 9, 2002
    Austin, TX

    I never understood the appeal of invertebrates as pets, until I caught this big guy outside of my office building (we also have tons of small scorpions, but that's a different story). At about 9 inches long he's about as big as the species gets.

    When I saw this incredible creature, I had to scoop him up (carefully!) and do some research on him. He is quite venomous, and also popular with invertebrate hobbyists. You can pick up a Scolopendra heros castieniceps from invertebrate specialists for around $50 for a 3-4 inch specimen. They are stunning to look at and are pretty active and agressive, making them interesting to watch.

    Sorry you lost your pet :(
  15. That is very impressive, secretdonkey. Though, to be honest, I think I'd be too scared of it to keep it as a pet.

    But! I had a huge lizard-easting spider as a pet when I lived in South Africa, many years ago. Leg-span about 8", a bright green colour (looked like a plastic toy!), I can't remember if it would ambush the lizards it ate or chase them.

    I know we used to feed it the lizards we caught in our kitchen.

    It was fascinating to watch, and I think it pretty much harmless to us humans.

    I could be wrong on several of those points though, I was about 4 at the time.

    And yoshi; sorry :(
  16. Petebass


    Dec 22, 2002
    QLD Australia
    I'd love to know how that old wives tale started. As a keeper of exotic African tropical fish I can tell you now they feel pain. And they have a memory greater than 3 seconds.

    Unfortunately part of keeping pets is that we usually out-live them. There's not much you can do about it besides buying a Macaw.
  17. Tsal


    Jan 28, 2000
    Finland, EU
    It probably started when biologists looked into nervous systems.

    <i>"Fish have small cerebral hemispheres lacking the type of cerebral cortex (or any alternative system) necessary for the psychological experience of pain. Therefore, it is highly unlikely that a fish’s reactions to noxious stimuli are associated with feelings of pain or distress."</i> (

    Could you tell why you think your fish feel pain? Yes, there is response to nervous stimulation but I'm not sure if it should automaticly be taken that they suffer or feel pain as mammals do.
  18. Petebass


    Dec 22, 2002
    QLD Australia
    Because when they get sick they behave just like other animals do. They're slower and they prefer not to move unless necessary. They don't even try to run away from the scooper net which according you the biologists would be a normal reaction to such a noxious stimuli.
  19. moley


    Sep 5, 2002
    Hampshire, UK

    Seriously though, yoshi - what is this moulting thing about?

    You said

    I had no idea Scorpions did this!! Is this the same as snakes shedding their skin?

    Also - is a scorpion not a dangerous pet? Or is this a species that isn't dangerous, or can't sting?

    Oh, and I'm sorry to hear about you losing your pet :(