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Nat'l Geo. called it last year

Discussion in 'Off Topic [BG]' started by Muzique Fann, Sep 6, 2005.


  1. Muzique Fann

    Muzique Fann Howzit brah

    Dec 8, 2003
    Kauai, HI
  2. The New Orleans Times-Picayune (local paper) has run their own "worst case scenario" article near the beginning of hurricane season every year for a while. The present situation has been a known possibility for years. In case anyone wants to throw a political spin on this: this has been a know possibility for numerous administrations, numerous governors, mayors, councilmen, congress persons, etc, etc, etc.

    It could have been worse. If we had followed the evacuation plan used for Ivan, more would be dead.

    Mike
     
  3. Gard

    Gard Commercial User

    Mar 31, 2000
    Greensboro, NC, USA
    General Manager, Roscoe Guitars
    Scientific American published a similar article in 2001.

    The people in and around New Orleans knew about it long before that...
     
  4. Muzique Fann

    Muzique Fann Howzit brah

    Dec 8, 2003
    Kauai, HI
    Yeah, it was all a matter of when - just thought they could have been a little quicker to help out with this knowledge.

    I wonder how our reaction is going to be when CA gets the big quake.
     
  5. My God, that is so weird!

    Let's just hope the death toll doesn't go anywhere near the 50,000 predicted in that article.

    I didn't even know that most of New Orleans was below sea level until they said so on the weather channel the day before Katrina hit.

    Mike
     
  6. Boplicity

    Boplicity Supporting Member

    I read that very issue of National Geographic last year and it worried me greatly. But how about this? Last year, FEMA did a "tabletop exercise" that played out scenarios just exactly as we have witnessed for an imaginary Hurricane Pam hitting New Orleans as a major hurricane. If you think I am just blowing hot air, Google Hurricane Pam.

    My question...what did FEMA do with or do about the scenarios they modeled?
     
  7. fraublugher

    fraublugher

    Nov 19, 2004
    ottawa, ontario, canada
    music school retailer
    http://www.editorandpublisher.com/eandp/news/article_display.jsp?vnu_content_id=1001051313

    When flooding from a massive rainstorm in May 1995 killed six people, Congress authorized the Southeast Louisiana Urban Flood Control Project, or SELA.

    Over the next 10 years, the Army Corps of Engineers, tasked with carrying out SELA, spent $430 million on shoring up levees and building pumping stations, with $50 million in local aid. But at least $250 million in crucial projects remained, even as hurricane activity in the Atlantic Basin increased dramatically and the levees surrounding New Orleans continued to subside.

    Yet after 2003, the flow of federal dollars toward SELA dropped to a trickle. The Corps never tried to hide the fact that the spending pressures of the war in Iraq, as well as homeland security -- coming at the same time as federal tax cuts -- was the reason for the strain. At least nine articles in the Times-Picayune from 2004 and 2005 specifically cite the cost of Iraq as a reason for the lack of hurricane- and flood-control dollars


    "And, as an added bonus, the Bushies have taken natural disaster planning and response away from FEMA. Note the dearth of FEMA weenies on the tube, unlike, say the '95 SF Earthquake or some of the recent hurricanes. There's no federal leadership on this at the moment because they took this activity away from FEMA and transfered it to an as-yet-uncreated (no ****) agency within DHS.

    it would be in extremely bad taste, akin to "waving the bloody shirt" (google it if you don't know) to make this an issue in the '08 campaign but, honestly, if someone pressed this issue down there it could turn those Red gulf states blue in a hurry. They're getting borked on all sides."
     
  8. fraublugher

    fraublugher

    Nov 19, 2004
    ottawa, ontario, canada
    music school retailer
    Tribune staff reports
    Published September 2, 2005, 2:44 PM CDT


    Frustration about the federal response to Hurricane Katrina has reached Chicago City Hall, as Mayor Richard Daley today noted a tepid response by federal officials to the city's offers of disaster aid.

    The city is willing to send hundreds of personnel, including firefighters and police, and dozens of vehicles to assist on the storm-battered Gulf Coast, but so far the Federal Emergency Management Agency has requested only a single tank truck, Daley said.
    "I was shocked," he said.

    "We are ready to provide considerably more help than they have requested," the mayor said, barely able to contain his anger during a City Hall news conference. "We are just waiting for the call."

    The mayor's remarks came at the announcement of a city-sponsored "Chicago Helps Fund," which will accept donations from citizens for the hurricane relief effort.

    "The people we see suffering on television are our brothers and sisters," Daley said. "It's incumbent on all of us, as American citizens and fellow human beings, to do our part to help them through this terrible tragedy."

    Donations to the Chicago Helps Fund can be made by cash or check at any J.P. Morgan Bank One branch or by sending a check to Chicago Helps, 38891 Eagle Way, Chicago IL 60678-1338. A toll-free telephone number will be announced later for those wishing to donate by credit card.

    Additionally, this weekend, Chicago firefighters will "pass the boot" at major intersections, and donations will be requested during the Chicago Jazz Festival in Grant Park, Daley said.

    Also, the Chicago Football Classic on Saturday will donate a portion of its proceeds to the relief effort. And the Department on Aging is sending a "Meals on Wheels" truck to the Gulf Coast region with food, blankets and other necessities for seniors.

    But the city is prepared to do far more, Daley said.

    Even before the storm hit the Gulf Coast on Monday, he said, the city's Office of Emergency Management and Communications had contacted emergency response agencies in Illinois and Washington.

    In the event of a disaster, the city offered to send 44 Chicago Fire Department rescue and medical personnel and their gear, more than 100 Chicago police officers, 140 Streets and Sanitation, 146 Public Health and 8 Human Services workers, and a fleet of vehicles including 29 trucks, two boats and a mobile clinic.

    "So far FEMA has requested only one piece of equipment {ndash} a tank truck to support the Illinois Emergency Response Team, which is already down there," Daley said. "The tank truck is on its way. We are awaiting further instructions from FEMA."
     
  9. Gard

    Gard Commercial User

    Mar 31, 2000
    Greensboro, NC, USA
    General Manager, Roscoe Guitars
    FEMA???

    ...well, apparantly Director Brown is very handy around Arabian horses...


    ...hurricane???

    :confused:
     
  10. bmc

    bmc

    Nov 15, 2003
    Switzerland
    What I find hard to believe is there is no running count on the death toll. Only estimates. Someone must be tracking it and reporting it somewhere.

    How many are known dead? Nobody knows? :rollno:
     
  11. The running total is known. It won't be released before a few more "victories" are publicized. It's all about damage control.

    On my parish's website there are only 6 deaths directly related to the hurricane and 75-100 "indirectly" related. I find this hard to believe. I think a more likely scenario is that 6 died from building collapse, etc. All those who died later from injuries or drowning after the fact are probably counted in the latter. It's all spin.

    Mike
     
  12. I'm worried about the countless #'s of people wading around in the waist deep toxic as all heck water. I'd hate to think of the illnesses these people may contract / suffer / die from in the weeks to come.

    horrible. Just horrible.
     
  13. bmc

    bmc

    Nov 15, 2003
    Switzerland
    Sadly, you are 100 percent right.
     
  14. bmc

    bmc

    Nov 15, 2003
    Switzerland
    You're not creating terrorists in Iraq. You're freeing the people, remember?

    Tough times for the USA ahead as the events of the past week are bringing lots of issues to the surface that don't have clear cut popular answers. I really feel for you guys. I mean that.
     
  15. What you think are unpopular answers are very popular to those that have a different viewpoint. Contrary to what you might think, we like playing that game here. Everyone who likes think they are right gets to pick a side and defend it to the death, regardless of evidence that may contradict their opinion.

    I think, just for fun, I may blame this entire catastrophe on the Nutria rat and see where that goes. If i'm loud enough, media inlets will pick up on my "story" and give it enough coverage to make it credible...then...it's off to the races, where I get to claim that I'm an "activist". From there I'll ride the perceived wave of public opinion, changing direction with the hot winds of loud groups, all the while blaming everything on my enemies without needing any proof. You should move here. The reality is unreal.

    Mike
     
  16. bmc

    bmc

    Nov 15, 2003
    Switzerland
    I like your attitude, Mike. My morning routine sees me up at 0600 when I surf CNN, Drudgereport, CBC and Intl Herald Tribune. Gotta admit I like Drudge the best. Bit of edge. Bit of both sides. Some outragious stuff. Some good columnists.

    Very interesting times in America and despite the bad news, America has the will and desire to make it a better place. Something it can entirely accomplish if the collective will supports it. Last weeks events clearly prove that we, as humans, can revert to primal behaviour in the blink of an eye, regardless of how advanced we think we are. Seeing third world situations unfold before our eyes in North America rattles me. I hope it rattles everone over there because the world likes to believe that the richest nation is beyond that.
     
  17. A guy predicted the hurricane about a month ago on Coast to Coast AM. Looking at the past guests, I think it was Gordon-Michael Scallion, who makes a lot of uncomfortable predictions about our future. Especially uncomfortable since he eerily predicted Katrina. I believe his words were that a major disaster was coming, probably around August 29 or 30th, and that thousands of people would have to be relocated. George Noory (the host) suggested that it could be a hurricane, and he agreed that it was a strong possibility.
     
  18. Boplicity

    Boplicity Supporting Member

    Here's the scariest thought. What if we have a major earthquake in San Francisco or LA, another major hurricane landfalling anywhere in the US, a massive bird flu outbreak or a terrorist attack in the next month or two?

    What Katrina has shown us more than anything is that we just aren't prepared to deal rapidly and effectively to massive natural or other disasters. We do not have a coherent strategy for a national crisis.
     
  19. canopener

    canopener

    Sep 15, 2003
    Isle of Lucy
    I don't think cookie cutter strategies would work in such unpredictable situations.
     
  20. P. Aaron

    P. Aaron Supporting Member

    What KAtrina has shown us is that people for their own reasons, continue to settle on land that is not always the most stable. Sure there's San Fran, and New Orleans, and the housing boom has left many Washington residents settling in nice new homes along the lava flows just outside Seattle. I am sure the veiw is nice.

    A Katrina timeline assembled here based on press releases from the New Orleans Times-Picayune

    The New York Times has had few nice things to say about levee funding and other water related projects in the past. Read them for yourselves if you want to.