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NBD: 2017/2018 Fender Special Run 70s Jazz Bass

Discussion in 'Basses [BG]' started by InstantEctobass, Apr 14, 2019 at 9:06 AM.


  1. Howdy fellow bass friends! :cool:

    Time has come for me to finally share my NBD experience! I was aiming at a 70s Jazz Bass with the proper, period correct pickup spacing (1971-1982 from what I've seen). When the new models from the Squier Classic Vibe series were announced, I was thrilled to see a 70s model with the period correct pickup spacing AND Jazz Bass logo, the delicious (to me) one! But sadly, after being one of the first persons to receive that bass (on Friday), it was a complete disaster in terms of finish and quality control. :(

    Instead, I then pulled the trigger on that: a MIM FSR 70s Jazz Bass from 2017/2018 (can't really be sure but the serial number starts with 17), a used one for 850 euros, with French quality-made pickups (Crel JB42, the original Pure Vintage 74 being dead) and a Fender hi-mass bridge instead of the vintage one (vintage pickup being given still). I got it yesterday and after a little worry with a weird noise, I found out that it was from the DR Hi-Beam strings that are surely defective, because another set solved the problem... puting them back and the noise was back. It's like a uncontrolled resonance. I'll surely feed that bass with Elixir 40-95 instead

    The bass looks like a reissue of a 1975 jazz bass overall, with black block inlays instead of abalone/pearl ones, and a 4-bolts neck attachment instead of the 3-bolts one. It's not stated as a reissue.

    Well, how is it? It sounds like a 70s Jazz Bass (and I needed that) and overall, it's well made, but not perfect-o-perfect. Let's start with the pros: lacquer is mainly good, biding looks neat, the two piece body is gorgeous, the Hi-mass bridge offers the compression of the attack I imagined (which is good), the electronics are good with a awesome closed-tone, still giving out a great range of low mids frequencies (not the nasty ones, the good ones), the tuners look solid. I was worried about the thickness of the neck but it seems okay for my tiny left hand. Neck dive is very tiny.

    The cons: there's a hole, like any MIM instrument, under the pickguard... thus you can't remove the pickguard without showing that hole. Too bad, the pickups routing are greatly made... The neck heel on the body is a little bigger than it should be, but that's okay I guess. The binding nibs aren't the most pleasant on the hand/fingers... but at least, they aren't sharp-cutting my fingers. But I should have considered that... :/ Also the planimetry of the frets could be a tad better, I guess. Thankfully, the leveling is okay and compensated

    Neutral: I wish it had a 1969/1975 Jazz Bass logo instead :p

    I'll try to upload sound clips

    Here' some photographs to finish (with my Squier CV 60s too):

    P_20190414_112543.
    P_20190414_112622.

    P_20190414_113004.

    P_20190414_113026.
    P_20190414_112802.
    P_20190414_120551-01.
    P_20190414_120747.

    Capture d’écran 2019-04-14 à 13.40.59.

    P_20190414_121219_BF_1.
     
    Last edited: Apr 14, 2019 at 7:20 PM
  2. Also some question:

    - Why does Fender not included the proper Allen key for some of their instruments? Apparently neither my 3mm and 4mm Allen keys work in that Bullet nut. Any ideas?
     
  3. eastcoasteddie

    eastcoasteddie

    Mar 24, 2006
    NoVA
    Wow! That is an awesome bass! I didn’t even know Fender did that run...
     
  4. That bass in incredibly unacknowledged on TalkBass, it was a 250 pieces run, so what Fender and revendors says. Apparently it never showed on Fender.com. It had the honour to have an american hardware and tuner on a mexican made lutherie. Also Pure Vintage 74 pickups are apparently American (?), but after reading several so so reviews on it, I'm looking for an alternative. I'd like to have pickups with normal sized pole pieces like a standard Jazz Bass set of pickups. Any recommendations from you?
     
  5. Most likely an SAE size, meaning non-metric. We may be England's most successful colony, but we're rebels at heart & refuse to conform.

    Beautiful bass by the way!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
     
    Malak the Mad and bobyoung53 like this.
  6. Thank you, that makes sense. But why don't they include it? :p Such money grinders haha
    Thank you again!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
     
  7. eastcoasteddie

    eastcoasteddie

    Mar 24, 2006
    NoVA
    There was a thread not too long ago about this. Some of us reminisced about buying new instruments in the 80s and 90s where the store would take the case and tools, throw them into a pile, then charge extra for them. This practice was very prevalent in NYC stores like Sam Ash and Manny’s. I’m not sure if they still do it, though.
    The tools for your bass may have been taken and put into a tech’s tool box (or in other words, “lost”)...who knows?

    The wrench you most likely need is a 3/16”, slightly larger than 4mm
     
  8. Apparently I need a 1/8", which a slightly larger than 3mm haha 4mm doesn't fit
     
  9. Rabidhamster

    Rabidhamster

    Jan 15, 2014
    If you have any fine rattail files you can smooth up the feel of the nibs and the edges of the binding. Polish it up afterward and it'll be nice and comfy. The edges just need softened
     
    InstantEctobass likes this.
  10. That is a good idea, to be honest! but I wouldn't do it myself in order not to destroy the bass... I would have ask a pro, when it comes to my most expensive bass guitar yet. For the moment, I decided to use a "mitt glove" (not sure of the correct word for that), which is way better. It's not like it's cutting fingers, but slows the playing a little bit. Mitt helps a lot. Cheers :)
     
  11. JRA

    JRA my words = opinion Supporting Member

    i think that's a great looking ax --- and you seem to have 'adapted' --- good for you! congratulations on your new instrument! :thumbsup:
     
    InstantEctobass likes this.
  12. G19Tony

    G19Tony

    Apr 27, 2018
    Las Vegas, NV
    I got very nice hex tools in my Ampro P and Strat.
     
  13. Thank you, sir! I'm very happy and I'm feeling complete with Jazz basses :)

    Oh, oh ! Anyway, the previous owner assured me he never got the truss rod key and that he had to see his luthier to adjust it. I will adjust with a brand new key very soon ;)
     
    JRA likes this.
  14. GroovyBaby

    GroovyBaby G&L Fanboy Supporting Member

    Oct 19, 2007
    Huntingdon, PA
    I have the same neck. 3/16” truss. And yea, it could use some edge roll. I’m tempted to file the roll but I’m not sure how that will work with the binding (plastic) and finish (flaking?) I was going to post those questions on TB.
     
  15. I'm sorry man, my neck doesn't have a 3/16" truss rod nut. In mm it is 4.763mm and my 4mm Allen key is bigger than the hex hole. I need a 1/8" for sure :/
     
    GroovyBaby likes this.
  16. bassstrangler

    bassstrangler

    Mar 2, 2015
    AZ
    Nice bass, I should know, I own one. Sorry to hear about the frets, mine doesn't have that problem.

    I think it's such a nice bass I put my USA Jazz up for sale.
     
  17. Yay!!!
     
  18. The frets aren't problematic, they are meant to be like that from what I've read/seen on original binded necks of the Fender era. It's not just the best feel under the fingers... my Squier CV 60s JB and its vintage short frets are the best frets I ever had so far
     
  19. bassstrangler

    bassstrangler

    Mar 2, 2015
    AZ
    Your description indicated the fret nibs were horrible. Mine aren't, they're the exact opposite of horrible. Plus as an educated person (I thought I was), I had to look up planimetry. My planimetry is also fine.
     
  20. EDIT: Maybe I exaggerated by stating that they were "an horror", let me correct my original post :)

    Sorry mate, I'm not an English native and I try my best to use the proper words. But be sure not to confound/mix planimetry and leveling. Planimetry is the act of installing frets on the same "depth" into the fretboard, and leveling is compensating for an more or less (un)perfect planimetry... well at least in my own definitions! I may be not understood. Either way: planimetry wasn't perfect on mine, but leveling is good and compensated. Frets are like new at least.

    Now, regarding the nibs, I'd be curious to see yours... if you could take close up. I'm gonna make some on my side and I'll show them, so you could tell me if yours look this way or differently. Cheers
     

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