1. Please take 30 seconds to register your free account to remove most ads, post topics, make friends, earn reward points at our store, and more!  
     
    TalkBass.com has been uniting the low end since 1998.  Join us! :)

Neck / Bridge pickups crossover

Discussion in 'Pickups & Electronics [BG]' started by Adam Harzuf, Aug 9, 2012.


  1. Adam Harzuf

    Adam Harzuf

    Nov 16, 2004
    Israel
    Hello all,
    I always prefer the punchy lows from my bridge pup and the sweet highs from the neck pup.

    I was thinking about trying to mildly filter (6db oct) some highs from the bridge and some lows from the neck, so perhaps I'll get an interesting tone from both.
    Usually (%90) I play the bridge pup alone, so I wouldn't mind if the highs are constantly rolled off a bit.
    I have an active bass so I can add highs.

    An ideal situation would be a stacked dual knob which controls the cutoff frequency off both, with a wide range, beyond audiable spectrum (so the filter operation is not heard when I don't want to)

    How can this be done?

    Thank you
     
  2. Adam Harzuf

    Adam Harzuf

    Nov 16, 2004
    Israel
    A simplified on/off version, with a dual switch and a specific crossover frequency (2 identical capacitors). Will this work alright with a passive blend?
     

    Attached Files:

  3. walterw

    walterw Supportive Fender Gold Supporting Member Commercial User

    Feb 20, 2009
    alpha-music.com
    the old tobias growler had a setup like this; one bartolini MM-style pickup, but each coil was in fact a humbucker, and each had its own active bass/treble EQ.

    it was kind of pointless, as the two coils were close enough to each other to not sound all that different initially.

    the same EQ setup on a jazz-type bass could be interesting, tough.
     
  4. FunkMetalBass

    FunkMetalBass

    Aug 5, 2005
    Phoenix, Arizona 85029
    Endorsing Artist: J.C. Basses
    I think that wiring diagram will work just fine with the blend. You should try to match the capacitors as well as possible, at least put the measurably larger cap on the bridge pickup (in parallel) so that you don't end up up with a more drastic mid scoop than what the parallel pickups on 50-50 blend will give you.
     
  5. Interesting idea. I like it.

    I usually just bias the height in favor of the neck pup and lower the bridge for a well rounded and fuller sound.
     
  6. Adam Harzuf

    Adam Harzuf

    Nov 16, 2004
    Israel
    Is this possible as well?
     

    Attached Files:

  7. Adam Harzuf

    Adam Harzuf

    Nov 16, 2004
    Israel
    You like the tone of the neck pickup better as a whole.
    I like the percussive lows from the bridge and sweet highs from neck.
     
  8. walterw

    walterw Supportive Fender Gold Supporting Member Commercial User

    Feb 20, 2009
    alpha-music.com
    i don't see it in those diagrams; the cap in parallel with the bridge pickup is just a tone control, and tone controls affect everything, not just the one pickup.

    rickenbacker used to do the cap in series thing to kill the lows of the bridge pickup; that did work.

    a more sophisticated crossover network could be rigged up, but i suspect you'd pay a big price in phase shift and overall signal loss.

    maybe if you got a pair of split-coil pickups, you could wire the neck for just the top strings and the bridge for just the bottom strings.
     
  9. SGD Lutherie

    SGD Lutherie Banned Commercial User

    Aug 21, 2008
    Bloomfield, NJ
    Owner, SGD Music Products
    The best way to get this tone is to have the pickups wound that way.
     
  10. Not saying this is ideal. But you could run a tone cap of choice in series with the neck pup to reduce it's low's and a treble bleed circuit on the bridge pup.

    I just don't know how you'd prevent the treble bleed circuit from effecting the neck pickup too. (Diodes?)
     
  11. SGD Lutherie

    SGD Lutherie Banned Commercial User

    Aug 21, 2008
    Bloomfield, NJ
    Owner, SGD Music Products
    You would have to use resistors. That would also reduce your output. Just do something like the stacked knob Jazz bass.

    The best way to do this is with an active setup. Then you can mix both pickups and they wont interact with each other.

    This is actually something I've tinkered with in the past. But what I was doing is when both pickups were on I was removing the high end from the neck pickup and the low end from the bridge so they would not overlap. I already wind them for a brighter neck and fatter bridge.
     
  12. Coolhandjjl

    Coolhandjjl Supporting Member

    Oct 13, 2010
    Appleton
    Aren't you fighting the natural character of those pups placement? The neck pup is supposed to be the one that is for fat lows, and the bridge pup for sizzling attack? And the blend and phase cancellation from them creates a mid scoop or a growl.

    Here's how Ric does it: The neck pup is pretty much normal. The bridge pup has a .0047 cap in-line that high pass's it at around 150 Hz IIRC. That cap also shifts the phase of the bridge slightly to minimize phase cancellation with the neck pup, for a fuller tone when both are run at full. In 1986, the .0047 cap was eliminated. The newer models added the cap back in, and also have a 'cap bypass switch' so it can also operate like a normal two pickup bass when desired.
     
  13. walterw

    walterw Supportive Fender Gold Supporting Member Commercial User

    Feb 20, 2009
    alpha-music.com
    just so, but i wouldn't call the tone "fuller", just the opposite.
     
  14. SGD Lutherie

    SGD Lutherie Banned Commercial User

    Aug 21, 2008
    Bloomfield, NJ
    Owner, SGD Music Products
    But then you have a muddy neck pickup and a thin bridge pickup. The reason is because any pickup near the neck will sound deeper and vice versa. So to stop the neck pickup from sounding muddy (for those times when you want a clear tone from the neck pickup) and so that the bridge is not thin sounding when soloed, you wind the neck pickup lower and the bridge pickup hotter.

    This gives you that nice growl from the bridge pickup, and a deep but clear tone from the neck pickup.

    As a person who played Ricks since about 1973, the 4001 bass was rather thin sounding. I think they used the cap because the bridge pickup used to over power the toaster, and it also had more low end. So they cut the lows out of the bridge pickup. But that made it useless by itself.

    But I did say I had worked on electronic methods for doing exactly what you are saying, but at a lower frequency than what the Rick cap does, but only when both pickup were on at the same time. And this was to get rid of that phase notch you hear on Jazz basses when both pickups are on.
     

Share This Page