Neck dive fixes?

Discussion in 'Hardware, Setup & Repair [BG]' started by moderatelyfunky, Jul 29, 2020.


  1. moderatelyfunky

    moderatelyfunky Supporting Member

    Jan 16, 2020
    I’m about to receive a bass I want to keep that may have some neck dive and I’m thinking about my options. It’s a sbmm short scale stingray. Maple neck and fingerboard.

    if lighter tuners won’t do it, what options are there? For people who know what they’re doing I mean.

    Is routing a channel in the back of a maple neck and filling the slot with something light an option?

    Just in case it wasn’t already perfectly clear, I wouldn’t be doing the work myself.
     
  2. Bloomfield

    Bloomfield

    Jan 21, 2020
    Nova Scotia
    Routing out the back of the neck and filling it is not an option. Gotoh Res-o-lite tuners are very nice and would save a few ounces on the headstock. Specs here: JAPARTS : Gotoh Bass Tuners If you had to you could stick some lead tire weights in the control cavity if space allows.
     
    imabuddha, backin82, bdplaid and 5 others like this.
  3. Beej

    Beej

    Feb 10, 2007
    Vancouver Island
    Reshaping the headstock a smidge smaller, plus planing a 1/16" off the back might bring the weight down a little as well, but you lose the decal on the back, it will require a refinish or blended repair, and overall it's not going to do much. Personally, I'd go with res-o-lite hardware and see how it goes. If it still does not balance, you could put weight in the control cavity. If you don't want to add weight to it, you can put a small strap button extension on the upper horn to help it balance better.
     
    imabuddha, JRA and moderatelyfunky like this.
  4. moderatelyfunky

    moderatelyfunky Supporting Member

    Jan 16, 2020
    Thanks very much, gentlemen!
     
  5. Ross W. Lovell

    Ross W. Lovell

    Oct 31, 2015




    How about a strap that has texture on the underside like brushed rough suede.
     
  6. dwizum

    dwizum

    Dec 21, 2018
    Heavier bridge.

    Choose the strap carefully! Thinner, slippery straps promote neck dive. Wider, grippier ones seem to help stop it.
     
  7. Sid Fang

    Sid Fang Reformed Fusion Player Supporting Member

    Jun 12, 2008
    Buy or make a leather pouch that goes well with your bass and/or strap. Put a slot or loop on it that goes over the tail end strap button, but leaves room for the strap. Put a few ounces of lead shot or fishing weights in the bag. You are making the rig heavier rather than lighter, but you are moving the center of gravity away from the headstock, without modifying the instrument.
     
  8. yodedude2

    yodedude2 Supporting Member

    Nov 19, 2005
    san antonio, texas
    move the bottom strap button 'up' (like on some spectors). get an extension for the upper horn strap button.
     
  9. Eddie LeBlanc

    Eddie LeBlanc

    Oct 26, 2014
    Beaumont, Texas
    Don't create no problem, won't be no problem.
    Move the bottom Strap button up the body a little.
    This what I did on a Gibby T-Bird (they are known for neck diving)
    upload_2020-7-29_20-3-4.png

    I ue a small pice of leather on the original strap button to secure a cable.

    Neck Through NS Spectors all have a bottom button moved up.
    upload_2020-7-29_20-7-47.png
     
    Drifter8230, thabassmon, JRA and 5 others like this.
  10. RichSnyder

    RichSnyder Gold Supporting Member Supporting Member

    Jun 19, 2003
    A short scale will have the headstock four inches closer to the body than the full scale stingray. I’d be surprised if it had any neck dive on a strap.
     
  11. ClusterFlux

    ClusterFlux Supporting Member

    Apr 11, 2018
    Another vote for a wide strap with some texture on the bottom.
     
  12. svlilioukalani

    svlilioukalani Supporting Member

    Sep 19, 2012
    Seattle, Wa
    For me a really good wide strap helps. Bigtime.
     
    Erithon and Dynacord like this.
  13. EXCAV8

    EXCAV8

    Dec 15, 2019
  14. darwin-bass

    darwin-bass Supporting Member

    Mar 29, 2013
    Salem OR
    A strap may help to prevent the neck from diving but it does ABSOLUTELY NOTHING to change the balance of the instrument. It is at best a bandaid fix (though it is a "fix", probably better than nothing).

    First, you may be borrowing trouble. The short scale pulls the headstock and tuners closer to the body which will probably reduce neck heaviness. So first off, see what it is before you do anything.

    Much of the balance is determined by things you can't change once the bass is built but there are a couple of options.
    • Eliminate as much weight as possible from the headstock. Res-o-lite tuners are the best.
    • Increase the weight of the body as close to the bridge as possible. The easiest here is to put on a high-mass bridge.
    • Switch plastic knobs to brass.
    • Mount the rear strap button closer to the center of the bass. At one time I had a strap button on the back of my bass that really helped offset neck heaviness.
    But again, I suspect you won't have an issue or if you do, Res-o-lite tuners will fix it. I got my Res-o-lites from Philadelphia Luthier. GOTOH GB350 Res-o-lite Compact Bass Tuning Machines Tuners - Sold Individually
     
  15. ctmullins

    ctmullins fueled by beer and coconut Gold Supporting Member

    Apr 18, 2008
    MS Gulf Coast
    I'm highly opinionated and extremely self-assured
    A sticky strap does not solve the problem. It only masks the symptoms.

    Truly solving the problem requires altering the weight distribution between the strap attachment points. Changing the center of gravity. Lighter tuners are a great first step. Weights in the body (or heavier hardware) will help as well, while running the risk of increasing the weight the player has to bear.

    Altering the strap attachment points can make a difference. Sometimes a huge difference. Moving the rear strap button up a few inches, into the curve of the lower bout, improves things. Moving the forward strap button towards the headstock will help a lot.

    The most drastic, yet the most effective, solution is to attach the strap to the headstock, a la Elvis!
     
  16. rumblesaust

    rumblesaust

    Nov 5, 2019
    thumbnail_20200715_202425.jpg thumbnail_20200715_202359.jpg this fixed my problem
     
  17. Bassamatic

    Bassamatic keepin' the beat since the 60's

    I saw a GREAT video about how to stop neck dive! His bass had bad dive. The solution was so simple. He ran the right end of the strap through the belt on his pants before attaching to the bottom of the bass. He could then jump around with no hands and no dive!! Fantastic! and simple and no mods needed except possibly to make the strap a little longer.

    Found it -
     
  18. 0729202004a.jpg
     
  19. Kukulkan61

    Kukulkan61 Suspended Supporting Member

    Feb 8, 2011
    Northern Arizona
    Get a bass that doesnt have neck dive:woot:
    On a serious note get a 4 inch wide strap with suede backing, it works wonders!
     
    Mats Orbation and Thehound like this.
  20. SubHuman

    SubHuman

    Dec 29, 2005
    Good Old USA
    I agree! It’s not rocket science! A wide leather suede strap has always worked for me! Bonus: They come in various colors too!
     
    Kukulkan61 likes this.
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    Primary TB Assistant

    Here are some related products that TB members are talking about. Clicking on a product will take you to TB’s partner, Primary, where you can find links to TB discussions about these products.

     
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