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neck needs more bow... use a C-clamp and bend it???

Discussion in 'Luthier's Corner' started by ::::BASSIST::::, Dec 21, 2005.


  1. ::::BASSIST::::

    ::::BASSIST:::: Progress Not Perfection.

    Sep 2, 2004
    Vancouver, BC Canada
    even with the truss rod fully loosened my neck wont bow enough. I saw a diagram in a bass book which showed a c-clamp combined with an iron bar (using shims etc to prevent damage to the neck). The notion is that with exerted pressure from the c-clamp the neck will bend before the "iron bar" does.

    My question is...

    how much pressure etc is safe to put on the neck? i dont want to crack/break it by cranking the c-clamp too much.

    is this solution really viable?
     
  2. Trevorus

    Trevorus

    Oct 18, 2002
    Urbana, IL
    I don't think I would do that... What I have heard most is a heat press to re-zero the neck. I think it has to be an even 140 degrees or a bit less. You don't want to mess up the finish. But this probably ought to be done by a luthier that has experience with this sort of thing.
     
  3. basstruck

    basstruck Guest

    Nov 25, 2005
    Sudbury
    Fully loosen the trust rod, install the highest gauge of strings you can find and tune it the highest you can (more than 440) and let it sit for about a month and make sure you check the neck every week for relief between the 5th and 9th fret.
     
  4. +1 if you tune it to a reference tuning (a real note that you can check on your tuner), then as the neck moves, the note should go flat...in which case, tune her back up...and like basstruck says, check the relief, too...

    it WILL move (unless it's a wishbass, of course :) )
     
  5. ::::BASSIST::::

    ::::BASSIST:::: Progress Not Perfection.

    Sep 2, 2004
    Vancouver, BC Canada
    Good idea! I will try that.

    Oh, uh... what is "440" in reference to?... what does it mean?
     
  6. on certain tuners, you can change the set frequency from 440 to something else...actually, what is that? htz? i never really looked into it
     
  7. 440Hz or 440 is the fundimental frequency for middle A on a piano...this is the reference frequency from which symphonic orchestras generally bass their tuning (it's sort of the "Greenwich Mean Time" of tuning).

    some orchestras actually tune a tad sharp (442) to give their music a slightly "brighter" feel...It actually works...but, I digress...
     
  8. basstruck

    basstruck Guest

    Nov 25, 2005
    Sudbury
  9. Biagio139

    Biagio139 Dealer: Hipshot Products, Inc.

    Dec 23, 2005
    Ithaca N.Y.
    hertz is time per secound. the completion of a wavelngth 440 times in a secound is 440hz, which is as stated above the first A above middle c on a piano next octave would be 880hz.
     
  10. the_burk

    the_burk

    Dec 21, 2005
    standard reference tone.. .you hear it in your telephone every day ... or atleast you did a few years ago...

    every octave is double or half that sum

    a is
    110 220 440 880 1760 and so on...

    every note is 1/8 of those... so in 110 /220 octave there is about 15 hz between every note... in the 220 440 there is about 30 hz between every note... (not counted halfnotes like ess ass diss and so on...

    thayts about all info on hz and tnes right now...
     
  11. luknfur

    luknfur

    Jan 14, 2004
    DIXIE
    What if you wanted more back-bow?
     
  12. FBB Custom

    FBB Custom TalkBass Pro Commercial User

    Jan 26, 2002
    Maryland
    Owner: FBB Bass Works
    Then you have to heat bend it.
     
  13. luknfur

    luknfur

    Jan 14, 2004
    DIXIE
    Yeh, I'd heard of taking like a 1 inch dowel or so and placing it beneath the strings around the lower frets, bringing up the tension, and leaving it for a period with periodic checks but was curious if anyone else had. Sounded good in theory and basically just sounds like a reverse spin on string tensioning idea.
     
  14. Fasoldt Basses

    Fasoldt Basses

    Mar 22, 2005
    Stevens Point, WI
    Karl Thompson, Builder (Formerly Fat Karl)
    The picture of the iron bar and clamp is not showing quite exactly what you think it is. Dan Earlwine uses this method, but uses the bar & clamp only as an aid, and does the real bending of the neck with the truss rod. This is to prevent stripping the truss rod threads by trying too hard to tighten the rod. I would recommend this method purely on the grounds that this is Dan Earlwine's method. I haven't used it myself.
     
  15. ::::BASSIST::::

    ::::BASSIST:::: Progress Not Perfection.

    Sep 2, 2004
    Vancouver, BC Canada
    this could be true. there wasnt alot of detail in the book. it just had the picture and a caption saying that this is one way of putting more bow in the neck. no other details.
     
  16. Fasoldt Basses

    Fasoldt Basses

    Mar 22, 2005
    Stevens Point, WI
    Karl Thompson, Builder (Formerly Fat Karl)
    Here's a quote from Dan Earlwine's Fret Work Step by Step:


    "This neck has way too much upbow or "relief," and simply tightening the rod isn't getting it straight. Put a notched wood block over the strings at each end of the neck, and with the truss rod loose, clamp the neck straight (or even into a slight back bow). Now when you tighten the truss rod it doesn't have to fight the neck - it's being 'helped' by the clamping. This isn't necessary with most necks, but it's often a good trick on an electric bass."


    Hope that helps.
     
  17. luknfur

    luknfur

    Jan 14, 2004
    DIXIE

    Okay, that's for more back-bow to flatten the neck then.

    Interesting I just pulled a bass off the wall that has been hanging for about a year I'd guess - loosened strings but forgot to back off the truss rod.

    That will do it too. Just takes a lot longer.
     
  18. ::::BASSIST::::

    ::::BASSIST:::: Progress Not Perfection.

    Sep 2, 2004
    Vancouver, BC Canada
    Okay, this method worked beautifully on my maple shortscale neck (thin and small). I actually used light tension strings as thats all I had. I way overtightened the strings, tuned it too a specific frequency (which I forget) and left it that way for about 3 weeks, re-tightening about once a week. It worked very well and now the action on that bass is very good. Best I've ever had.

    I have a moses graphite neck. About to try the same process. I doubt it will work because graphite wont bend like wood. However, I am still going to try. Even if there is a slight chance it works its worth a shot.