Neck peices

Discussion in 'Basses [BG]' started by Brendan, Jul 28, 2000.

  1. Brendan


    Jun 18, 2000
    Austin, TX
    is there any noticable differences in basses that have three peice or quarter sawn necks? I hear these horror stories about necks twisting, but is that really a problem? Most of the necks I see are single peice. Is that because of the twisting problems I heard about? Or is it just easier?
  2. Bob Gollihur

    Bob Gollihur

    Mar 22, 2000
    New Joisey Shore
    Big Cheese Emeritus: Gollihur Music
    I have basses with all three; the only bassed I ever owned whose neck twisted was a '72 maple fretless precision (bad), and a '83 Precision Special that has a walnut neck (only very slightly, not bad enough to fix).

    Quartersawn and laminated wood necks have less of a chance to warp than flatsawn wood, but it's really all about how the wood was dried and selected.

    Quartersawn wood is much more expensive than flatsawn because the mill gets less yield out of the same log. Laminated necks mean more labor and a extra waste.

    - Bob
    eclectic bass - <A HREF="" TARGET=_blank></A>
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    DoubleBass LINKS page -</A>
  3. Angus

    Angus Supporting Member

    Apr 16, 2000
    Palo Alto, CA
    Welcome to TB Bob! Good to see we have to generations of bassists at TB (you and sixandeightstringer)! That pretty much said it.

    And a lot of people will use 1 piece necks or multilaminant necks because of the sound. A neck with three pieces of maple, or 2 pieces of maple with a piece of purpleheart in the center will sound the same. They can use the woods to get the sound they desire. It might not be a noticeable difference, or it might be, but anyone can argue that. So the sound the makers want sometimes has to do with the way the neck is constructed. Also, multilaminant(with same or multiple woods) vs. single piece of wood can vibrant/resonate differently, so thats a factor sometimes also.