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Neck profiles...

Discussion in 'Basses [BG]' started by theFixer, May 31, 2017.


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  1. theFixer

    theFixer

    May 30, 2017
    Michigan
    I too prefer a flatter radius. The time I've spent on guitar helped me establish that. I used to have an old Strat with a 7.5" radius. That thing gave a whole new meaning to the term "reach-around"! It was a veritable plethora of unintentionally muted strings & sloppy playing in general. I blame the "Z" axis you mentioned. I can see why the "thumb-over" guys like 'em though. For me, wide & flat is where it's at!
     
    tzohn likes this.
  2. bassdude51

    bassdude51 "You never even called me by my name." Supporting Member

    Nov 1, 2008
    Central Ohio
    2saddleslabs knows BEST!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! The fatter, the better!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    Look for a one incher all the way!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! That is one inch thick from heel to headstock.

    Allparts sells some almost inch thick Jazz Bass necks. Their maple P necks are .92 @ fret #1.

    1951 to 1954 slabs have the fattest necks....................that's the way they are suppose to be!!!!!!!!!!!!

    Unfinished Neck for Jazz and Precision Bass | Allparts.com
    Finished Maple Precision Bass Neck | Allparts.com
     
    2saddleslab likes this.
  3. tzohn

    tzohn

    Apr 26, 2015
  4. Russell L

    Russell L

    Mar 5, 2011
    Cayce, SC
    I understand. I guess I'm spoiled by my old '87 Jazz Bass Special. The edges aren't rolled as much as my '01 American Jazz, but I love the feel of the neck otherwise (7.25" radius, 1.5"at the nut, and low frets). It's also basically a C-shape, but just a tad thicker than my '01 Jazz. Just something about it. Never a problem for reach. For me, that is.
     
  5. tzohn

    tzohn

    Apr 26, 2015
    I have to admit though that 7.25" looks cool
     
    Russell L likes this.
  6. Rip Van Dan

    Rip Van Dan DNA Endorsing Artist Supporting Member

    Feb 2, 2009
    Duvall, WA
    Thanks Fender_Bender. I actually have exactly what I want now, though I pretty well stopped looking at most necks back in 1985 and had tried literally hundreds (worked in a music store) of basses before finding it. I still pick them up occasionally in stores, but I'm no longer searching because I found what I was looking for. I'll make a point of trying a Road-Worn Jazz out if I run across one in a music store. Honestly though, if I bought one of those, I would probably refinish it because I have always been very careful with my basses to keep them in the best shape possible. So, owning a bass that looks likes it's been beaten up would drive me nuts.

    I toured with my 1965 Jazz Bass playing nightclubs 5-nights a week/50-weeks a year for 3-years and after that used it for casual gigs on weekends up until 1976 when it was stolen. It had one mark on the back where a girl singer dropped the base of a mic stand on it in 1968 (it was leaning up against the amp - last time I did that!) and left about an inch and a half scar on the lower back of the bass. That was the only sign of wear on it Obviously it had the nitrocellulose-lacquer finish, and I never had it get worn like that. While I was touring we all wore specific outfits and everyone of those had long sleeves, so that probably had a lot to do with lack of apparent wear during that time of extensive use. Primarily wore short sleeves at casual gigs after that though. Anyhow, I'd prefer a new bass to look new as long as possible, but that's just my preference.
     
  7. theFixer

    theFixer

    May 30, 2017
    Michigan
    That is remarkable! Do you have any pics of the finished bass that you'd be willing to share?
     
  8. I can respect your view on the finish. Some of the relic is in unrealistic places but there is pretty much zero worry about getting a new scratch or mar. I had mine fall over forward once and it put a new dent/scratch below the bridge. It was a little upsetting for a minute but then I just rubbed some nose grease into it and went on my way. My 50's classic p bass is immaculate and I have to be super careful with it and baby it to try and keep it so.
     
    Rip Van Dan likes this.
  9. I'll take some of the neck. I don't want to hijack the thread.
     
  10. Gary Stevens

    Gary Stevens GS Custom Guitars. Gary Stevens. Florida USA Supporting Member Commercial User

    Dec 8, 2019
    Green Cove Springs, Florida
    Luthier since 1989
     
  11. Gary Stevens

    Gary Stevens GS Custom Guitars. Gary Stevens. Florida USA Supporting Member Commercial User

    Dec 8, 2019
    Green Cove Springs, Florida
    Luthier since 1989
    As a builder and bass player, I prefer an asymetrical V neck profile a full inch deep. It fits my average-size hand. Remember, our hands are not symetrical. Shallow C shapes cramp my thumb and hand.
     
  12. Gary Stevens

    Gary Stevens GS Custom Guitars. Gary Stevens. Florida USA Supporting Member Commercial User

    Dec 8, 2019
    Green Cove Springs, Florida
    Luthier since 1989
     
  13. Gary Stevens

    Gary Stevens GS Custom Guitars. Gary Stevens. Florida USA Supporting Member Commercial User

    Dec 8, 2019
    Green Cove Springs, Florida
    Luthier since 1989
    Lumber and tool stores have a tool that has a row of thin metal rods. This tool is made to profile a wood moulding. It is great for determining a neck profile. I use this tool all the time. Cheap and effective.
     
    tomZbass likes this.
  14. Since someone "liked" my post from 3 yrs ago I'm back! I hadn't looked at this since then.
    I remembered that I saved an old shot of neck profiles from fender. Not sure why I didn't post it then. Anyway here ya go!

    image.png

    image.png
     
    StevieMac, tomZbass, friend33 and 2 others like this.
  15. Gary Stevens

    Gary Stevens GS Custom Guitars. Gary Stevens. Florida USA Supporting Member Commercial User

    Dec 8, 2019
    Green Cove Springs, Florida
    Luthier since 1989
    I build a soft V into my basses. It is an asymetrical shape; flatter curve on the low E side and rounder curve on the G side. This shape is about a full inch deep yet it feels thinner due to the flatter curve on the low E side. Also, a thicker neck is stiffer and more stable. People who experience my asymetrical V say, "it fits my hand!". Remember, our hands are not symetrical.
     
    2saddleslab and JRA like this.
  16. Gary Stevens

    Gary Stevens GS Custom Guitars. Gary Stevens. Florida USA Supporting Member Commercial User

    Dec 8, 2019
    Green Cove Springs, Florida
    Luthier since 1989
     
  17. Gary Stevens

    Gary Stevens GS Custom Guitars. Gary Stevens. Florida USA Supporting Member Commercial User

    Dec 8, 2019
    Green Cove Springs, Florida
    Luthier since 1989
    All 5 of my main basses are GS Custom Guitsrs 30.5" scale. All have an asymetrical soft V that is thicker than a Fender C shape. Why asymetrical? Because my left hand is not symetrical! People that try my basses pick one up then have a surprised look. They say, "it fits my hand!"
     
  18. tomZbass

    tomZbass

    Nov 20, 2019
    Carbondale, CO
    I own only two basses....sorry...... an 2006 Epiphone Jack Casady and a 2016 Fender American Professional Jazz. I have a super long thumb......no really....I love the way the Jack feels and I'm indifferent to the way the Jazz feels but it's not my favorite. The Jack has a 12" radius and the Jazz has a 9.5". I'd love to know what the neck profile differences are on the back of the neck.
     
  19. Ric Vice

    Ric Vice Supporting Member

    Jul 2, 2005
    Olivette, Missouri
    To some degree yes, but in my particular case, with small hand and 35" scale 5 string necks on Lakland 55-94's I have to use Double Comfort Straps and lighter gage lower

    tension strings to prevent right hand fatigue with fretted basses. Doing Tai Chi and hand exercises is also very helpful in preventing issues.
     
  20. Gary Stevens

    Gary Stevens GS Custom Guitars. Gary Stevens. Florida USA Supporting Member Commercial User

    Dec 8, 2019
    Green Cove Springs, Florida
    Luthier since 1989
    I build basses for myself and other people. I make an "asymetrical V" shape for five reasons. 1 it fits my smallish hands. 2 I like a chunky neck. A V can be chunky and feel thinner than it is.3 as a builder, a deep neck is a solid, stable neck. 4 my hands are not symetrical. Asymetrical shape FITS. 5 a thin (fender) neck gives me hand cramps. Everyone likes my neck profile. No one doesn't like my neck profile. I think Warmouth makes an asymetrical neck as an option. Cheers. All opinions are valid.
     
    tomZbass likes this.
  21. Primary

    Primary TB Assistant

    Here are some related products that TB members are talking about. Clicking on a product will take you to TB’s partner, Primary, where you can find links to TB discussions about these products.

     
    Feb 28, 2021

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