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Neck wood and lamination

Discussion in 'Luthier's Corner' started by umberto, Jun 10, 2004.


  1. umberto

    umberto

    Jun 10, 2004
    What's the reason of assembling a neck (-through body) [and a body] with more than one kind of wood.
    Is the 3 or five pices of wood lamination useful or just smartlooking?
    I know that to enforce the neck it's possible to fit in one or more graphite bar. Do the other kinds of wood assembled in the neck provide the same result?


    P.S.
    I.ve tried to find the answer with Search function, but... sorry: didn't manage :smug: .
     
  2. PasdaBeer

    PasdaBeer

    Nov 2, 2002
    Santa Rosa California
    SandStorm Designs
    diffrent tone woods.....diff sound,

    also some real hard stable woods do the same purpose as graphite ( ie purple heart )
     
  3. Suburban

    Suburban

    Jan 15, 2001
    lower mid Sweden
    Inserting material with different materials makes for a truly different composite.

    When we are talking wood, you get:
    - changed stiffness
    - changed weight
    - less warp (is properly done)

    And the stiffness/weight proportion is the backbone of the sound, whereas avoiding warp is keeping an instrument useful.

    And it might look and feel rather nice, too.
     
  4. PasdaBeer

    PasdaBeer

    Nov 2, 2002
    Santa Rosa California
    SandStorm Designs
    sub, those basses ya got are wicked looking!
     
  5. umberto

    umberto

    Jun 10, 2004
    Then which solution do you raccommend to increase the sound warmth of a 4 string electric bass: how many kinds of wood assembled in the neck, and what do you consider the warmer ones?
     
  6. PasdaBeer

    PasdaBeer

    Nov 2, 2002
    Santa Rosa California
    SandStorm Designs
  7. tjclem

    tjclem Supporting Member Commercial User

    Jun 6, 2004
    Central Florida
    Owner and builder Clementbass
    I have used and liked Bubinga, Wenge and Ipe as stiffining/contrasting stripes in necks. Tom
     
  8. Suburban

    Suburban

    Jan 15, 2001
    lower mid Sweden
    Well, what is "Warm tone"???
    What you should aim for is maximum flat response, and do any "tone fix" with the elctronics. See, if the instrument is mechanically neutral, you can do whatever with the electronics!

    How to get such a response: low weight x high stiffnes = high resonance frequence
    Resonance frequency above 8000 Hz takes away most dead spots and similar fenomena.

    A neck, laminated ortogonally to the fingerboard, could consist of maple or black walnut, with purpleheart, wenge or pau ferro stringers. I would also consider a couple of stright through (visible) graphite stringers.
    If the neck is laminated the other way, parallel to fingerboard, an interesting combo would be two thin wafers of pau ferro and a spruce core.
     
  9. Suburban

    Suburban

    Jan 15, 2001
    lower mid Sweden
    Might do so, but they are really nice! :p :smug: :D

    :bassist: :hyper:
     
  10. umberto

    umberto

    Jun 10, 2004
    Is it possible to outline a proportion between the neck/body/fretboard capability to affect the sound?
    I think that fretboard doesn't play tha major role in this proportion. Does it?
     
  11. tjclem

    tjclem Supporting Member Commercial User

    Jun 6, 2004
    Central Florida
    Owner and builder Clementbass
    if it is a fretless the fingerboard makes a big difference...T
     
  12. Suburban

    Suburban

    Jan 15, 2001
    lower mid Sweden
    :D
    No, it has a minor impact on tone, that is true. Even on a fretless!!

    Actually, it is not possible to make such an outline you ask for.
    Simply because of the differnt shapes you will use. It is a matter of mass and stiffness distribution.

    However....
    The structural properties of the backbone (i.e. what keeps the upper string anchorage and teh lower ditto together) joins with electronics as the major factors of the instruments tone. And then we have the fingers of the player.... :eek: