Neckthru Bass V in progress (almost done...)

Discussion in 'Luthier's Corner' started by erikbojerik, Sep 18, 2005.

  1. Hi All Y'all

    I'm new to the forum, crossing over from another one. I've built several guitars, this is my first bass. Flame maple-walnut-ebony-padauk neck thru & ebony board, wings of bocote & ebony over walnut core. 36" scale, single Bart MM5 and SD Basslines preamp (Vol/pull slap EQ, low, mid, high), Gotoh tuners, Dunlop straplocs.

    I'm at the point now of applying the Tru-Oil finish, so far only 5 coats in and I love it. I like the open-pore appearance but my plan is to keep going until I fill 'em, then buff out to a mirror (if my restrain myself from wanting to play it that is :D ).

    Comments appreciated!


    early stage (headstock now has maple ears)

  2. Cutting the nut slot at the headstock

  3. Phil Mastro

    Phil Mastro

    Nov 18, 2004
    VERY nice, i dig that top, i like your headstock design. Keep the pictures coming
  4. Zetora


    Aug 16, 2004
    Very nice indeed,

    Love the wood combo

    Beautiful scrolls, not sure why but I'm not the biggest fan as the lower horn scroll, to me it should be inverted towards the neck not away from it, but that me, still looks mighty fine.

    Make sure to pop back on and update us with it.

  5. Phil Mailloux

    Phil Mailloux

    Mar 25, 2005
    Brisbane, Australia
    Builder: Mailloux Basses

    Much nicer than what we've seen yet Erik! (on another forum;) )

    The back carve is wonderful, I love it. Go for that GOTM man!
  6. Theshortlist_to


    Apr 20, 2005

    seconded, there was another design not dissimilar to this one which had the same critisizm, right?

    still some beautiful carving on the scrolls, nice!
  7. Thanks for the replies everyone. Yeah, from the very beginning I could not make up my mind about what to do with the lower horn, and believe me I looked at a lot of basses for ideas. No one idea seemed any better or worse than any other, so in the end I figured I'd just carve another scroll and at least have double the experience.

    What about strings? With the Bart MM5 I'm definitely going after some growl factor, but I'd also like to achieve a fairly bright clean sound too, maybe by splitting the MM5 coil (?). Is that asking too much from a single set of strings?

    You may be able to tell...I'm a guitar player crossing over to bass :bag:
  8. John Ruiz

    John Ruiz

    Oct 9, 2000
    Plano, Tx
    It's cool to see you over on this side. I have seen the other shots you have at the other site (I'm bassisgreat over there), and it looks like things are going great! I'll be looking forward to seeing this one done.
  9. Yep, finally cross the finish line with this one. It took more than a month for me to find time to cut the nut and truss rod cover, making it over a year in the making. But it's worth it!

    The Yei Bass

    The name is taken from the Navajo word meaning Beautiful One (as one of its many translations) and in reference to the Mexican rosewood (bocote) top and back. The hand-carved scrolls are a nod to Carl Thompson, the rest is original.

    9-layer neckthru - padauk-flame maple-ebony-walnut-flame maple
    Full-length 1/4” ebony neck lams…the “Teeth of the Dog” so to speak
    5-layer body wings - flamed walnut core, ebony accents and bocote caps, 1-1/2” thick total
    Ebony fretboard,, ebony-bocote headstock laminate, ebony nut, ebony truss rod cover
    36” scale w/ 24 jumbo frets, 16” radius, 1-7/8” nut width, 3” wide at 24th fret
    Custom asymmetric neck back contour, 0.9” thickness, volute, double-action hot rod
    Black Gotoh tuners w/ gold nuts & mounting screws
    Black Hipshot bridge w/ gold saddles & mounting screws
    Black Dunlop straplocs w/ gold accents
    Bartolini 72MV5C humbucker pickup at the Stingray sweet spot
    Seymour Duncan Basslines 3-band active preamp jacked up to 18V, ±12dB high-mid-low cut/boost, push-pull on volume kicks in a scooped “slap contour” to the EQ that boosts the high & low ends and cuts the mids, the amount of scoop is adjustable with variable micro-pots on the circuit board
    Control cavity shielded w/ copper tape, covered w/ shielded bocote cover cut directly from the back cap
    40 coats of Tru Oil, the last 5 cut 50/50 with naptha
    Weight: 13 lbs

    I made a conscious decision to buy a black and a gold version of all my hardware, then swap half the parts to get the gold-on-black vibe. Of course this now means I have to do something with all this black-on-gold hardware....another bass, of course!!!

    The 36” scale takes some getting used to, but the high string tension is wonderful…no low-B fettuccini egg-noodle here, I can tune down to low-A no problem! The bass is quite bright sounding but the ebony nut and the Basslines preamp tame it just enough. Roll the volume down and with the extra 18V headroom you can get a really nice range of tones, from piano to woody. Crank the volume back up and the extra brightness really jumps out when you kick in the “slap contour” and start spanking this bad boy. The spacing of the Hipshot bridge and the Bart humbucker is also nice from a play-ablity standpoint, you get that nice Stingray growl but you also have enough room between the strings and in front of the pup to make slapping a real joy. Even for a guitar player…

  10. Neck lams (the flame washed out in the upper half of this pic due to the light angle).

  11. Particularly the lower horn. Ironically, perhaps, it seems it would be quite functional for balancing on your lap & accessing upper-register frets. Nice.
  12. DavidRavenMoon

    DavidRavenMoon Banned

    Oct 20, 2004
    That's a beautiful bass! Nice job!
  13. Very, very, nice work. It's got an Alembic vibe and that's suckin' me in big time!

    I coined a name for the mixed hardware - "calico" hardware. I do the same thing with black and chrome - especially mixing stainless steel screws on black hardware. I like the look.
  14. Plus, all black bridges are hard to find, and don't really look good.
  15. teacherguy


    Feb 21, 2004
    Cincinnati, OH
    All I can say is WOW!
    Simply amazing work!

    40 coats of true oil!?!?! Are you kidding??
    How long of a process was that?

  16. you got the thumbs up from Hambone...what else needs to be said?

    Fantastic mix of the aesthetic and function...40 coats of true oil...SWEET!...IMO better than any spray lacquer finish I've ever seen.